Artwork

コンテンツは レアジョブ英会話 によって提供されます。エピソード、グラフィック、ポッドキャストの説明を含むすべてのポッドキャスト コンテンツは、レアジョブ英会話 またはそのポッドキャスト プラットフォーム パートナーによって直接アップロードされ、提供されます。誰かがあなたの著作権で保護された作品をあなたの許可なく使用していると思われる場合は、ここで概説されているプロセスに従うことができますhttps://ja.player.fm/legal
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Myths to Manga: Japan-themed exhibition celebrates opening of London’s newly branded museum

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Manage episode 383600125 series 2530089
コンテンツは レアジョブ英会話 によって提供されます。エピソード、グラフィック、ポッドキャストの説明を含むすべてのポッドキャスト コンテンツは、レアジョブ英会話 またはそのポッドキャスト プラットフォーム パートナーによって直接アップロードされ、提供されます。誰かがあなたの著作権で保護された作品をあなたの許可なく使用していると思われる場合は、ここで概説されているプロセスに従うことができますhttps://ja.player.fm/legal
A family-friendly museum in London presents an exhibition to introduce all things Japanese, from Hokusai’s nineteenth-century woodblock print to a kimono ensemble for a dog. It aims to show how stories passed from one generation to another have shaped art, design, and technology in Japan. Many have come across the name “Hokusai” and his iconic woodblock print, ‘The Great Wave.’ The image can be seen on T-shirts, mugs, and tea towels, but it is not widely known that the artist, Katsushika Hokusai, was one of the first to use the term “manga.” “Manga” is derived from two Japanese words— “man,” which means whimsical or entertaining, and “ga,” which means pictures or images in general. In the books published by Hokusai, there is no text or dialogue—slightly different from the modern versions which have become a worldwide phenomenon. Despite having internationally recognized characters scattered across the floor, the exhibition goes beyond the world of manga and anime. “A highlight of Japan: Myths to Manga is the incredible crossover between art, design, and technology and how playfulness and creativity are infused within Japanese culture and part of their stories and how the stories and the landscape of Japan go on to have inspired some of the most much-loved anime, manga, and incredible designs," explains curator, Katy Canales. Canales herself has fond memories of playing with Sylvanian Families (1985-1995) which reflect coexistence with nature—the very principle of Japan's indigenous faith, Shinto. The connection between folklore and its influence on Japanese culture is seen through the 150 objects and artwork on display. “What we hoped to do was to bring something that children and their families would really enjoy so that it would be something for everyone to take part in,” Canales says. “For the parents to be able to see items from their childhood and to be able to pass that on and to really engage with their children, to be able to talk, create a discussion and hopefully inspire them to be creative as well.” This article was provided by The Associated Press.
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2092 つのエピソード

Artwork
iconシェア
 
Manage episode 383600125 series 2530089
コンテンツは レアジョブ英会話 によって提供されます。エピソード、グラフィック、ポッドキャストの説明を含むすべてのポッドキャスト コンテンツは、レアジョブ英会話 またはそのポッドキャスト プラットフォーム パートナーによって直接アップロードされ、提供されます。誰かがあなたの著作権で保護された作品をあなたの許可なく使用していると思われる場合は、ここで概説されているプロセスに従うことができますhttps://ja.player.fm/legal
A family-friendly museum in London presents an exhibition to introduce all things Japanese, from Hokusai’s nineteenth-century woodblock print to a kimono ensemble for a dog. It aims to show how stories passed from one generation to another have shaped art, design, and technology in Japan. Many have come across the name “Hokusai” and his iconic woodblock print, ‘The Great Wave.’ The image can be seen on T-shirts, mugs, and tea towels, but it is not widely known that the artist, Katsushika Hokusai, was one of the first to use the term “manga.” “Manga” is derived from two Japanese words— “man,” which means whimsical or entertaining, and “ga,” which means pictures or images in general. In the books published by Hokusai, there is no text or dialogue—slightly different from the modern versions which have become a worldwide phenomenon. Despite having internationally recognized characters scattered across the floor, the exhibition goes beyond the world of manga and anime. “A highlight of Japan: Myths to Manga is the incredible crossover between art, design, and technology and how playfulness and creativity are infused within Japanese culture and part of their stories and how the stories and the landscape of Japan go on to have inspired some of the most much-loved anime, manga, and incredible designs," explains curator, Katy Canales. Canales herself has fond memories of playing with Sylvanian Families (1985-1995) which reflect coexistence with nature—the very principle of Japan's indigenous faith, Shinto. The connection between folklore and its influence on Japanese culture is seen through the 150 objects and artwork on display. “What we hoped to do was to bring something that children and their families would really enjoy so that it would be something for everyone to take part in,” Canales says. “For the parents to be able to see items from their childhood and to be able to pass that on and to really engage with their children, to be able to talk, create a discussion and hopefully inspire them to be creative as well.” This article was provided by The Associated Press.
  continue reading

2092 つのエピソード

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