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Australian project leans on Montessori model in elderly care rethink

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Manage episode 402727803 series 2530089
コンテンツは レアジョブ英会話 によって提供されます。エピソード、グラフィック、ポッドキャストの説明を含むすべてのポッドキャスト コンテンツは、レアジョブ英会話 またはそのポッドキャスト プラットフォーム パートナーによって直接アップロードされ、提供されます。誰かがあなたの著作権で保護された作品をあなたの許可なく使用していると思われる場合は、ここで概説されているプロセスに従うことができますhttps://ja.player.fm/legal
The benefits of the Montessori education model have long been discussed in relation to children. Now a project in Australia is looking at the natural interests and activities of the older generation as part of an elderly care rethink. Researchers say it's helping older people to stay active and enjoy the things they love. A program called Living Well Together developed by Monash University is helping people who have dementia to live better lives by being more active and carrying on enjoying the things they love. The project is an all-encompassing care program and even includes a pretend café for residents to make themselves a cup of their favorite hot drink. “It has got better yeah, they give you more to do,” says resident Maureen Nicholls. The CEO of Baptcare, a faith-based not-for-profit residential and community care provider operating across Australia’s southeast, says they wanted to create an environment where the focus was always centered on the person as opposed to the place and routines. “We're already seeing significant impact,” says Geraldine Lannon, Baptcare CEO. The model is based on the Montessori school of thought which has been tried and tested for years on younger people. In an aged care setting, the idea is to focus on the personal interests, preferences, and independence of residents. “It's my idea. My thoughts, my feelings, like a cloud has been taken away,” says resident Joy McMillan. “We're very happy that we are making residents' life meaningful here. They are not just sitting there, they're doing a lot of activities,” says registered nurse Subi Gurung. And because the project has been such a success here, it’s now being put in place in 15 other aged care centers. “It's really easy to demonize residential aged care and to kind of say it's an awful place, but I think we as a society have the collective right to think what could it look like?” says Darshini Ayton, an associate professor at Monash University. And for McMillan, it’s the simple things that bring her the most pleasure, like what’s on the day’s menu. When asked what she enjoys most, she says "dinner" with a smile. "I like chicken," concludes McMillan. This article was provided by The Associated Press.
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2143 つのエピソード

Artwork
iconシェア
 
Manage episode 402727803 series 2530089
コンテンツは レアジョブ英会話 によって提供されます。エピソード、グラフィック、ポッドキャストの説明を含むすべてのポッドキャスト コンテンツは、レアジョブ英会話 またはそのポッドキャスト プラットフォーム パートナーによって直接アップロードされ、提供されます。誰かがあなたの著作権で保護された作品をあなたの許可なく使用していると思われる場合は、ここで概説されているプロセスに従うことができますhttps://ja.player.fm/legal
The benefits of the Montessori education model have long been discussed in relation to children. Now a project in Australia is looking at the natural interests and activities of the older generation as part of an elderly care rethink. Researchers say it's helping older people to stay active and enjoy the things they love. A program called Living Well Together developed by Monash University is helping people who have dementia to live better lives by being more active and carrying on enjoying the things they love. The project is an all-encompassing care program and even includes a pretend café for residents to make themselves a cup of their favorite hot drink. “It has got better yeah, they give you more to do,” says resident Maureen Nicholls. The CEO of Baptcare, a faith-based not-for-profit residential and community care provider operating across Australia’s southeast, says they wanted to create an environment where the focus was always centered on the person as opposed to the place and routines. “We're already seeing significant impact,” says Geraldine Lannon, Baptcare CEO. The model is based on the Montessori school of thought which has been tried and tested for years on younger people. In an aged care setting, the idea is to focus on the personal interests, preferences, and independence of residents. “It's my idea. My thoughts, my feelings, like a cloud has been taken away,” says resident Joy McMillan. “We're very happy that we are making residents' life meaningful here. They are not just sitting there, they're doing a lot of activities,” says registered nurse Subi Gurung. And because the project has been such a success here, it’s now being put in place in 15 other aged care centers. “It's really easy to demonize residential aged care and to kind of say it's an awful place, but I think we as a society have the collective right to think what could it look like?” says Darshini Ayton, an associate professor at Monash University. And for McMillan, it’s the simple things that bring her the most pleasure, like what’s on the day’s menu. When asked what she enjoys most, she says "dinner" with a smile. "I like chicken," concludes McMillan. This article was provided by The Associated Press.
  continue reading

2143 つのエピソード

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