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Physics World Weekly offers a unique insight into the latest news, breakthroughs and innovations from the global scientific community. Our award-winning journalists reveal what has captured their imaginations about the stories in the news this week, which might span anything from quantum physics and astronomy through to materials science, environmental research and policy, and biomedical science and technology. Find out more about the stories in this podcast by visiting the Physics World web ...
 
Physics Alive is the podcast where host Brad Moser, Ph.D., sparks new life into the physics classroom. He speaks with researchers and textbook authors on the frontiers of physics education, life science and health professionals who use physics on an everyday basis, designers and engineers who learn from the natural world, teachers who employ innovative and active learning styles, and students who want the most out of their education.
 
Join Mobile Nations gamers each week as they discuss every aspect of the gaming world. From launch events and live streams to current events and deep thoughts on the most random of things. This is a group of platform inclusive, easily excited nerds with something to say about basically everything. Subscribe at your own risk!
 
Physics is full of captivating stories, from ongoing endeavours to explain the cosmos to ingenious innovations that shape the world around us. In the Physics World Stories podcast, Andrew Glester talks to the people behind some of the most intriguing and inspiring scientific stories. Listen to the podcast to hear from a diverse mix of scientists, engineers, artists and other commentators. Find out more about the stories in this podcast by visiting the Physics World website. If you enjoy what ...
 
Radio Physics is for everyone! You don't have to be a scientist or even an aficionado to be fascinated by the questions and answers that you'll hear between 4:30 and 5:00 on the fourth Tuesday of every month. Radio Physics is a collaboration with top high school physics students from Aspen to Rifle, the Aspen Center for Physics, and KDNK Community Radio in Carbondale. Students interview one of the more than 1,000 physicists who visit the Aspen Center for Physics every year.
 
Hey there! I'm the host Dillon Berger (@InertialObservr)--a PhD Student of Theoretical Particle Physics a UC Irvine. Join me as I track down some of the most interesting people on the internet, and discuss everything including Physics, Philosophy, Mathematics, and even UFOs. . We also take your questions, if you tune in Live! So grab a cold one wherever you are, and join us when the sun goes down for Physics After Hours.
 
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show series
 
“My mission is to demystify quantum computing,” says Ilyas Khan, who is founder and chief executive of Cambridge Quantum Computing (CQC) – a UK-based provider of software for quantum computers. Khan is our guest in this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, and he explains how CQC helps its clients use quantum computers to solve big problems…
 
Robin and Thomas go for another ramble … and for a walk in the country as well. Albert Einstein was in charge They start by chatting about using self made simulations to enhance your teaching (especially now that students are limited in their access to practical work). Thomas had put together a cracking simulation to find resistivity on a wire in E…
 
The Jiggle Physics gang are joined by Sam Tolbert for a look at some new games, including: Demon Souls, Spider-Man: Miles Morales, Bugsnax, Assassin's Creed Valhalla, and more! LINKS: Demon's Souls for PS5 review: A remake leads the way into the next generation | Android Central Spider-Man: Miles Morales review — The best Spidey yet | Android Centr…
 
An unlimited world of structures built from precision-engineered unit parts – it is easy to see why LEGO appeals to many physicists. But in addition to the pure enjoyment, this plastic construction toy is also a great teaching tool, and it has even featured in serious science experiments. In the November episode of Physics World Stories, Andrew Gle…
 
In 2020, Joe Redish retired from a 50-year career as a physics professor at the University of Maryland. During that time he was actively involved in the subject of physics education, from the use of computers, to cognitive modeling of student thinking, to the role of student expectations and epistemologies in their learning, and his more recent foc…
 
Dark-matter detectors usually conjure up images of large underground facilities, but relatively small quantum sensors such as atomic clocks and magnetometers have also joined the search for the elusive stuff. In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, Andrei Derevianko at the University of Nevada, Reno explains how it is done. We are also…
 
How great to reach out across the pond and catch up again with Patrick Kaplo (an early hero of the podcast who teaches in Windham, NH). He has been hunkering down and adapting to new paradigms, and it is refreshing to hear that the problems we are all dealing with are pretty similar, no matter where you are in the world. Patrick has been adapting t…
 
Rebecca, Carli, and Jen review the new Xbox Series X, Series S, and Sony Playstation 5. But they also cover X-Men comics, Baby Yoda's insatiable appetite, and why you shouldn't blow vape smoke into your console. LINKS: List of Xbox Series X, Series S known bugs and launch issues | Windows Central Here's every lie about the Xbox Series X, debunked |…
 
I present a kinesthetic model of the human circulatory system. This model connects the physical principles of Poiseuille’s Law and mass conservation to blood flow throughout the human body. Students grapple with conflicting principles, see the limitations of the Bernoulli principle, and ultimately gain a deeper understanding of the physics behind c…
 
This episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast features an interview with Carol Marsh, who was recently honoured by the UK’s Queen Elizabeth II for her work on diversity and inclusion. Edinburgh-based Marsh talks about her role as deputy head of electronics engineering at the aerospace and defence company Leonardo and about her efforts to get mor…
 
Thomas and Robin meet outside, at an appropriate social distance, to remember Tim Hardingham and introduce an interview with the PhET Head of Development Ariel Paul (@DrArielPaul). Surely all physics teachers have heard of this outstanding free source of simulations and demos provided by the University of Colorado Boulder. Support PhET! PhET was th…
 
For many physics educators, PhET’s are an essential teaching technology both in and out of the classroom. In this episode, I speak with Ariel Paul, the Director of Development for the PhET interactive simulation project. Ariel discusses the ins and outs of PhET development, how the team goes from an idea to a complete simulation in your web browser…
 
If we are to create a colony on the Moon – perhaps as a jumping off point for the human exploration of Mars – we will need a source of water. In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, planetary scientist Hannah Sargeant of the Open University explains how water could be obtained on the Moon and what it would be used for. This week we als…
 
Rebecca, Jen, and Carli discuss THICCC BEEFINESS: aka PlayStation 5. Cyberpunk 2077 has been delayed into December, while Far Cry 6 and Rainbow Six Quarantine have been postponed past April 2021. Carli reviews Watch Dogs: Legion from Ubisoft, and the gang pick out the best horror games for Switch and Xbox One in 2020. LINKS: PS5 demand far outweigh…
 
If no rules about content and grading existed, what would you do? I truly believe that we can do anything. The possibilities are endless. In this episode, I acknowledge the COVID-19 world crisis and the stress that both teachers and students are under. Even under normal circumstances, teachers are chronically stressed and often experience burnout. …
 
Have you ever stepped into the classroom and found yourself surrounded by…pre-health students? Many of them don’t necessarily want to take physics, but here they are, sent to you by their program’s requirements. What do you do? Well, you could do what my guest today did: ask the medical professionals what students should be learning in a physics cl…
 
What if I told you there is a place where you can discover new teaching methods, access scores of validated assessments, find videos to train your TA’s and LA’s, and even read a guide for how to move a lab course online. And what if I told you it is absolutely free and open access. Don’t believe me? Well it’s true! It’s called PhysPort, and today I…
 
In the beginning, we stood and lectured to our students, filling the chalkboard with brilliant mathematics, dazzling from our stage. Then, education research showed that there are many, many better ways to facilitate learning. In this inaugural episode, your host, Brad Moser, shares his current perspectives within his ongoing journey through physic…
 
This week is #BlackInPhysics week, a series of events dedicated to celebrating Black physicists and their contributions to the scientific community. In this episode of the podcast, we talk to two of the week’s co-organizers, Ashley Walker and Xandria Quichocho, about what #BlackInPhysics week involves, why it’s needed and what they hope to achieve.…
 
Is Genshin Impact the clone-y-est clone of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild? The gang review it along with Mario Kart Live: Home Circuit and a preview of Little Nightmares 2. No cryptid chat this week, but there's a nice little side quest into CCG's and Beanie Babies! LINKS: What is Genshin Impact and should you play it? | Android Central Ge…
 
Finding a material that is a superconductor at room temperature has been the Holy Grail of condensed matter physics for over a century. In this episode we meet Ranga Dias of the University of Rochester whose team has created a material that is a superconductor at 15 °C. The only catch is that it has to be squeezed at a pressure of two million atmos…
 
Robin and Thomas are joined by Rajani Nair (@NairPhysics) who answered a Twitter call about A-level required practicals and was whisked in front of a microphone to talk to us. If you fancy coming on to talk about an aspect of physics teaching, just drop us a line in the contact form below. Rajani had some really interesting variations on the standa…
 
Team Jiggle Physics are here for Miles Morales' new pal Spider-Cat! They also check out the user interfaces for PS5, Xbox One, and Xbox Series X. In the "One Game You'll Never Be Able To Play, But One You Will" Department: Crucible has been canceled by Amazon Games, but we do have a preview of Assassin's Creed Valhalla. All that, plus our favorite …
 
This episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast features interviews with two leaders in the race to build practical quantum computers. Michelle Simmons is director of Australia’s Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology. She talks about how her early work on fabricating solar cells kindled a passion for building el…
 
Thomas and Robin mull over the recent Nobel Prize for Physics, then chat to Carole Kenrick about IoP Domains and zines. The Nobel Prize is still the ultimate accolade and viewed with envy by the fields that don’t have a Nobel Prize (in your face, maths!). This week we start by congratulating the three winners of the 2020 physics prize: Roger Penros…
 
Media coverage of quantum computing often focusses on the long term potential for these devices to leave classical computing in the dust. But what about the rudimentary quantum systems that are already being developed and tested by technology companies? What are the latest advances in the field? And what might these systems realistically be able to…
 
In this episode we look at the ground-breaking research on black holes that led to Roger Penrose, Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez winning the 2020 Nobel Prize for Physics. On hand are experts Laura Nuttall of the University of Portsmouth and the LIGO–Virgo–KAGRA collaboration, who studies gravitational waves from merging black holes and Harvard Uni…
 
(aka Elysia and her Magic Box of Physics) Robin and Thomas meet Elysia (@PhysicsMumma) who helps them talk through the dear listener’s ideas for teaching under the current social distancing guidelines. She then talks them through her box of physics and introduces Frank the Flamingo. My 'box of physics' everyone laughs at me but that's part of the f…
 
Peter Parker gets a face lifts that looks curiously similar to Tom Holland in the Spider-Man remaster game for Playstation. CD Projekt RED is the latest studio to require crunch time for employees as the near release of Cyberpunk 2077. The crew also react to Steve from Minecraft and his pixel-y meat as the next fighter for Super Smash Bros. And the…
 
In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast Google’s Sergio Boixo explains why the tech giant is building its own quantum computers. Boixo will be a plenary speaker at the upcoming Quantum 2020 virtual conference, and we will be interviewing other plenary speakers in future episodes of the podcast. Next up is Ramon Barthelemy – a physicist …
 
WARNING: the following content contains numerous cheap references to Paddington Bear – see links. Matt Bowman Way back at the beginning of series one we were thrilled to hear from an international school teacher named Matt who had just landed in Lima (presumably bearing a label saying “Please look after this physics teacher”). Fast forward two year…
 
Microsoft has purchased ZeniMax Media, which makes it seem like they own pretty much ALL the RPGs now. The gang discuss what this might end up meaning for game fans, They also look at Luna — Amazon's game streaming service. At first glance it looks to have a lot in common with Google Stadia, but maybe better? The conversation moves from there to Ma…
 
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