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PricePod - Public Policy Conversations

USC Sol Price School of Public Policy

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Each month, the PricePod bridges the gap between theory and practice, offering new perspectives on how public policy impacts our lives and communities. Our conversations with USC Price School faculty range far and wide, from issues like traffic gridlock and the homelessness crisis to the spiraling cost of healthcare and corruption in politics. Whether you’re a policy wonk, a student, or simply curious about how research can change our world, the PricePod is your source for informed, engaging ...
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Innovation Files: Where Tech Meets Public Policy

Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) — The Leading Think Tank for Science and Tech Policy

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Explore the intersection of technology, innovation, and public policy with the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF), the world’s leading think tank for science and tech policy. Innovation Files serves up expert interviews, insights, and commentary on topics ranging from the broad economics of innovation to specific policy and regulatory questions about new technologies. Expect to hear some unconventional wisdom.
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The UC Public Policy Channel provides a platform for policy-makers, policy critics, and innovative policy thinkers gathered by the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley to speak the truth clearly, convincingly, and constructively in pursuit of solutions for the good of all. Visit: uctv.tv/public-policy
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The UC Public Policy Channel provides a platform for policy-makers, policy critics, and innovative policy thinkers gathered by the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley to speak the truth clearly, convincingly, and constructively in pursuit of solutions for the good of all. Visit: uctv.tv/public-policy
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Wales Centre for Public Policy

Wales Centre for Public Policy

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Welcome to PEP Talk - a podcast from the Wales Centre for Public Policy where we talk about policy, evidence and practice in Wales. Each episode we’ll tackle a challenge facing those of us who work across public policy in Wales, looking at the scale of the issue and what the evidence says about how we should go about tackling it.
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History and Public Policy Program

Cold War International History Project

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Podcasts and event audio from the Woodrow Wilson Center's History and Public Policy Program, which includes the Cold War International History Project, the North Korea International Documentation Project, and the Nuclear Proliferation International History Project and is home to the Digital Archive at www.digitalarchive.org International History Declassified, with Pieter Biersteker and Kian Byrne of the History and Policy Program focuses on interviews with historians to gain insight into the ...
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The Texas Interfaith Center for Public Policy Official Podcast

Texas Interfaith Center For Public Policy

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This is the official podcast of the Texas Interfaith Center for Public Policy. The TICPP is a faith-based 501c3 nonprofit with a mission to help people of faith participate faithfully and effectively in public policy discussions concerning broad religious social concerns through non-partisan education on policy issues and training in civic participation. From food and mental health to the theology of creation care, the Interfaith Center is committed to developing people of faith into well-ed ...
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Abigail Meller is an aspiring activist, feminist, and a couple of other –ists, with a passion for health policy, advocacy work, and civil rights. Join her as she discusses current public health, healthcare policy, and social justice issues on Generation Invincible, a bi-weekly podcast by a millennial, for millennials.
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Protracted economic crises, accelerating inequalities, and increased resource scarcity present significant challenges for the majority of Africa's urban population. Limited state capacity and widespread infrastructure deficiencies common in cities across the continent often require residents to draw on their own resources, knowledge, and expertise …
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The future will be much improved if society fights the fear of technology. Rob and Jackie sat down with Jim Pethokoukis, Senior Fellow and DeWitt Wallace Chair at the American Enterprise Institute, to discuss how the sci-fi fantasy of the future isn’t as far off as we think. Mentioned James Pethokoukis. The Conservative Futurist: How to Create the …
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Thank you to all of our listeners for tuning into the podcast this year. We’re taking a short break this summer to record new conversations that explore the impact of public policy with USC Price School faculty. In the meantime, here are some highlights from our first season, where our guests offered evidence-based insights that paint a more nuance…
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Over the past several decades, predominantly White, postindustrial cities in America’s agriculture and manufacturing centre have flipped from blue to red. Cities that were once part of the traditional Democratic New Deal coalition began to vote Republican, providing crucial support for the electoral victories of Republican presidents from Reagan to…
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Think that today's debates about the role of the Federal Reserve Bank, financial regulation, "too big to fail", etc. are new? Think again. Who should control banks, who should regulate banks, what should banks even do--these questions have been debated since the founding of the Republic. Replace CNBC's David Faber with Alexander Hamilton, and Joe K…
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Until 1900, most political parties in the United States chose their leaders – either in back rooms with a few party elites making decisions or in conventions. The direct primary, in which voters select party nominees for state and federal offices, was one of the most widely adopted political reforms of the early twentieth century Progressive moveme…
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Since coming to power in 2002, Turkey’s governing party, the AKP, has made poverty relief a central part of their political program. In addition to neoliberal reforms, AKP’s program has involved an emphasis on Islamic charity that is unprecedented in the history of the Turkish Republic. To understand the causes and consequences of this phenomenon, …
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What types of coalitions can deliver social justice within sustainability initiatives? And how can we avoid reproducing unjust distributions of risk and responsibility in urban sustainability efforts? In this episode, Kenneth Bo Nielsen, Arve Hansen, and Manisha Anantharaman discuss these questions by engaging with Anantharaman’s new book Recycling…
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John Dewey's Democracy and Education (1916) transformed how people around the world view the purposes of schooling. This new edition makes Dewey's ideas come alive for a new generation of readers. Nicholas Tampio is a professor of political science at Fordham University. He is the author of Teaching Political Theory: A Pluralistic Approach (2022) a…
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It’s comforting to think that we can be successful because we work hard, climb ladders, and get what we deserve, but each of us has been profoundly touched by randomness. Chance is shown to play a crucial role in shaping outcomes across history, throughout the natural world, and in our everyday lives. In The Random Factor: How Chance and Luck Profo…
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Aya Gruber, a professor of law at the University of Colorado Law School, has written a history of how the women’s movement in America has shaped the law on domestic violence and sexual assault. In The Feminist War on Crime: The Unexpected Role of Women’s Liberation in Mass Incarceration (University of California Press, 2020), Professor Gruber conte…
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Weh Yeoh's Redundant Charities: Escaping the Cycle of Dependence (Koan Press, 2023) presents a transformative approach to charitable work. Drawing on his extensive experience in the non-profit sector, Yeoh argues that the ultimate goal of a charity should be to render itself unnecessary. He critiques the traditional charity model, which often perpe…
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Newburgh is a small postindustrial city of some twenty-eight thousand people located sixty miles north of New York City in the Hudson River Valley. Like many other similarly sized cities across America, it has been beset with poverty and crime after decades of decline, with few opportunities for its predominantly minority residents. Sixty Miles Upr…
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It is widely acknowledged that the United States is in the grip of an enduring housing crisis. It is less frequently recognized that this crisis amounts to more than there being an insufficient supply of adequate shelter. It rather is tied to a range of other forms of social and economic vulnerability – and many of these forms of vulnerability impe…
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In Disability Worlds (Duke UP, 2024), Faye Ginsburg and Rayna Rapp chronicle and theorize two decades of immersion in New York City’s wide-ranging disability worlds as parents, activists, anthropologists, and disability studies scholars. They situate their disabled children’s lives among the experiences of advocates, families, experts, activists, a…
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Poverty is big business in America. The federal government spends about $900 billion a year on programs that directly or disproportionately impact poor Americans, including antipoverty programs such as the earned income tax credit, Medicaid, and affordable housing vouchers and subsidies. States and local governments spend tens of billions more. Iro…
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What makes Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) uniquely Latinx? And how can university leaders, staff, and faculty transform these institutions into spaces that promote racial equity, social justice, and collective liberation? Today’s book is: Transforming Hispanic-Serving Institutions for Equity and Justice (Johns Hopkins UP, 2023), by Dr. Gina A…
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Dialysis is a medical miracle, a treatment that allows people with kidney failure to live when otherwise they would die. It also provides a captive customer for the dialysis industry, which values the steady revenues that come from critically required long-term care that is guaranteed by the government. Tom Mueller's six year deep dive into the dia…
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On this episode of International Horizons, Francesco Duina, Charles A. Dana Professor of Sociology at Bates College and Luca Storti, Associate Professor of Economic Sociology at the University of Turin in Italy and a Research Fellow of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies, discuss the rise of inequalities around the globe and the di…
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A sweeping history of the United States’ economy and politics, in Shock Values: Prices and Inflation in American Democracy (U Chicago Press, 2024), Carola Binder reveals how the American state has been shaped by a massive, ever-evolving effort to insulate its economy from the real and perceived dangers of price fluctuations. Carola Binder narrates …
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For centuries, people who died destitute or alone were buried in potters’ fields—a Dickensian end that even the most hard-pressed families tried to avoid. Today, more and more relatives are abandoning their dead, leaving it to local governments to dispose of the bodies. Up to 150,000 Americans now go unclaimed each year. Who are they? Why are they …
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During the COVID pandemic, billions of dollars in relief aid was sent out to help us ride out the storm, although many people who struggled through it might scratch their heads at such a number, having seen little of it make any concrete impact in their own lives. This discrepancy is indicative of the underlying problem with the contemporary care e…
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For 40 years, this classic text has taken the issue of economic inequality seriously and asked: Why are our prisons filled with the poor? Why aren't the tools of the criminal justice system being used to protect Americans from predatory business practices and to punish well-off people who cause widespread harm? This new edition continues to engage …
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The paradox of poverty amidst plenty has plagued the United States throughout the 21st century--why should the wealthiest country in the world also have the highest rates of poverty among the industrialized nations? Based on his decades-long research and scholarship, one of the nation's leading authorities provides the answer. In The Poverty Parado…
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In his latest book, The Road to Freedom: Economics and the Good Society (W. W. Norton, 2024), Nobel laureate Joseph E. Stiglitz rethinks the nature of freedom and its relationship to capitalism. While many agree that freedom is good and we want more of it, we don’t agree about what it is, whose freedom we’re talking about, or what outcomes we desir…
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Ryan Reft is a historian in the Manuscript Division at the Library of Congress, where he oversees collections pertaining to 20th and 21st century domestic politics and policies. He received his PhD in U.S. urban history from the University of California San Diego in 2014, and his writing has appeared all over the place, from edited volumes to acade…
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