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The mission of the Johns Hopkins Hospital Nursing Research Program is to inspire and engage with nurses to participate in and disseminate the three forms of inquiry: evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and research. The Center for Nursing Inquiry’s purpose is to increase the competence, confidence and capacity of Hopkins nurses to engage in meaningful scholarly activities.
 
Johns Hopkins Medicine is pleased to present its health and medicine podcast, a lively discussion of the week’s medical news and how it may affect you. This five to seven-minute free program features Elizabeth Tracey, director of electronic media for Johns Hopkins Medicine, and Rick Lange M.D., professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins and vice chairman of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.
 
Join physicians at Johns Hopkins Medicine for its women’s health podcast series, A Woman’s Journey: Insights That Matter, on the first Thursday of each month. Host Lillie Shockney, acclaimed humorist cancer survivor, and nurse, discusses Women and Heart Disease; Symptoms You Shouldn’t Ignore; Mindfulness; Sleep; The Microbiome; Advances in Breast Cancer Treatment; Brain Research; A-fib; Kidney Disease in Women of Color; and Memory with Johns Hopkins experts. Learn about medical advances and ...
 
As a leading provider-sponsored health plan, Johns Hopkins HealthCare is redefining the value of health insurance through provider collaboration and member-centric care. Episodes will feature leaders in the integrated health care landscape discussing value-based care in pursuit of innovative health solutions and quality outcomes.Who this podcast is for: health care professionals (payers and providers), health care users, and anyone curious about transformations in managed care.
 
Dr. Mark Vaughan reviews COVID-19 (Coronavirus or SARS-CoV-2) pandemic news updates daily each weekday. Updates are based on daily news and scientific reports and are usually shorter than 5 minutes. Most of the information is gleaned from the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security daily updates among other sources of health and medical news stories. Dr. Vaughan is the Medical Director of the Auburn Medical Group. He also serves on the Board of Directors for Sutter Independent Physicians. L ...
 
Jessica Houston is an award winning, Johns Hopkins-trained nutritionist, creator of EatClean30 and founder of Vitamin & Me. She is deconstructing the health space and bringing you access and clear guidance straight from the world's leading experts on strategies to increase healthspan, mental and physical wellbeing through a deeper understanding of nutrition, fitness and wellness. On this podcast, we take you behind the scenes with top global health leaders so you can learn what proper nutrit ...
 
Strength & Speed podcast focuses on Obstacle Course Racing ( OCR ) improvement by pulling in lessons learned from other sports. Hosted by Pro OCR athlete and Army Special Forces veteran Evan Perperis. Evan is a NSCA-CPT, the author of 6x books on Obstacles Course Racing, with an undergrad from Johns Hopkins and has a Masters from KU. An accomplished OCR athelte with 55+ OCR podiums including winning the team division at the 24 hour long 2018 World’s Toughest Mudder and 2nd place Pro Coed Tea ...
 
Two physicians, through dialogue and interviews, take a critical look at medical training and the culture of medicine and explore how interpersonal boundary clarity and the capacity to fully engage are essential to effective medical practice, mentoring, medical education, and a nourishing career. This podcast builds on Dr. Weiner’s book, On Becoming a Healer: The Journey from Patient Care to Caring about Your Patients (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2020). Hosted by Saul J. Weiner MD, and S ...
 
The Locked On Orioles Podcast is the daily podcast giving you unrivaled coverage of the Baltimore Orioles. Hosted by Johns Hopkins play-by-play voice and lifelong Orioles fan Connor Newcomb, the podcast dives into news, analysis, stats, and opinion on all the happenings in the Warehouse and at the Yard from your host and special guests. The Locked on Orioles Podcast is part of the Locked On Podcast Network.
 
Hosted by Bill Curtis and quadruple board certified Dr. Steven Taback, Medicine, We’re Still Practicing sits down with doctors from the world’s most preeminent hospitals for insights into their research, practice, and education. The first in this dedicated series is Johns Hopkins Medicine, with the goal of not only to share the magnificent work being done by these hospitals and doctors, but for them to be able to use it as a high-quality educational tool and platform to share insights and re ...
 
Each week Andrew Parasiliti, president of the award-winning news site Al-Monitor, and Amberin Zaman, Al-Monitor’s Senior Correspondent, interview newsmakers, journalists and thought leaders from the US and Middle East about the latest news and trends in the region. Andrew has been writing about, and traveling in, the Middle East for over three decades, meeting and interviewing the region’s top political and civil society leaders. Since obtaining his PH.D from Johns Hopkins University, he has ...
 
Conversations with Key Opinion Leaders and our host Dr. Neil Bressler from the Wilmer Eye Institute in the field of ophthalmology. eOphthalmology Review is a monthly CME certified newsletter and podcast series created specifically for ophthalmologists and retina specialist. The program is presented by the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
 
O podcast trata sobre temas diversos de economia e os impactos da crise do novo coronavírus nessa área. O que os governos devem fazer? Que ações devem tomar? Monica de Bolle, é PhD em Economia pela London School of Economics. Atualmente é pesquisadora-sênior do Peterson Institute for International Economics (PIIE) e diretora do Programa de Estudos Latino Americanos da Johns Hopkins University, em Washington, D.C. Traz diariamente reflexões sobre economia em linguagem simples e acessível a to ...
 
Nudges in the Right Direction is a podcast produced by the Center for Behavioral & Experimental Agri-Environmental Research (CBEAR). CBEAR is co-directed by Dr. Kent Messer and Dr. Paul Ferraro at the University of Delaware & Johns Hopkins University. CBEAR is funded by the USDA's Economic Research Service. For more information, please visit www.centerbear.org
 
Personal Wealthbuilders is on a mission to help everyone create wealth and have their money work for them. Your hosts Kathleen Sindell, Ph.D. and Tim Wesling, CPF will help you get on the road to financial freedom. Kathleen Sindell, Ph.D. is the author of “Investing Online for Dummies, Edtions 1-5” and teaches Personal Wealth Management at the Johns Hopkins Carey School of Business. Tim Wesling, CFP is the President of Wesling Financial where he advises individuals on the very best ways to m ...
 
In the medical world, I'm an internist and primary care doctor at Johns Hopkins. I see patients, do research on decision-making, uncertainty, and patient-doctor communication; I teach with residents; and I write about the complexities of healthcare. In the non-medical world, I write in English and Yiddish, translating as well between both languages. I publish poetry, short stories, and essays/journalism.
 
Dr. Clifton Bingham from the Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center begins with a review of current best practices, including the issues related to diagnosis. Dr. George Lawry will follow with an overview of the risks and benefits of biologic therapy for patients with RA before Dr. Bingham presents on emerging DMARDs.The second half of the nearly 2 hour presentation covers the subject of comorbidities, presented by Dr. Lawry, on how to recognize comorbidities and how to best manage them. Dr. Bingham ...
 
Advancing Health Systems in Low and Middle Income Countries Podcast. This podcast series aims to help listeners appreciate why health finance and governance must be addressed when working to improve health outcomes, and will include episodes which delve into the dynamics of topics like domestic resource mobilization for health, expanding access to healthcare through insurance, and the importance of “good governance” in creating responsive, patient-centered health systems. The Health Finance ...
 
Do you want to learn how to become a successful and happy MD? Yes? Well then this show is for you. Each week we bring you an inspiring person or message to help you unlock your full potential. You’ll learn the career secrets of some of the most successful doctors in the world, how they got to where they are, how they learn, their attitudes, what they look for in a young physician and much, much more. We try to reveal the success strategies that no one ever teaches you in medical school. You’ ...
 
The treatment of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is an increasingly complex and rapidly changing discipline with new information and techniques emerging. In addition, the incidence of DR and RVO is increasing dramatically. It is vital you remain up to date with the latest information, to insure your patients receive the optimal care. With that in mind, What's New in Diabetic Retinopathy & Retinal Vein Occlusion will review cutting edge therapies and techniques in D ...
 
The annual student-run Foreign Affairs Symposium at The Johns Hopkins University is returning to the Homewood campus this month, with several prominent speakers scheduled to appear during the spring semester under the theme, “From the Front Line to the Bottom Line.” All of the events are free and open to the public and take place at 8 p.m. in Shriver Hall Auditorium on their appointed dates. Each lecture is followed by a reception with the speaker and a book signing, if applicable. Retired G ...
 
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show series
 
Have you heard of the ‘nicotine hypothesis’? That’s the idea put forward by supposed scientific studies that somehow nicotine helped protect people from severe Covid-19 disease. Michael Blaha, a cardiologist at Johns Hopkins and tobacco cessation advocate, says there’s no evidence nicotine is beneficial. Blaha: I think we have pretty solid evidence…
 
Sarah Szanton, chair of the Patricia M. Davidson Professorship for Health Equity and Social Justice, discusses three key areas of her research: aging, finance in health, and resilience. Follow on Twitter: Sarah Szanton @ sarah_szanton Johns Hopkins School of Nursing @JHUNursing Episode Highlights: 0:23 Dean Davidson worked on getting an endowed cha…
 
Dr Akila Viswanathan speaks with Dr Ramesh Rengan and Dr Jing Zeng, both from the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Washington Medicine, about treatment advances in non small-cell lung cancer for Seminars Radiation Oncology.Akila Viswanathan による
 
Women and non-Hispanic Black persons were more likely to experience sunburns when taking the blood pressure medicine hydrochlorothiazide than other groups, research by Anna Chien and colleagues at Johns Hopkins has shown. Chien says protecting one’s skin requires a number of strategies. Chien: These days we’re really emphasizing a multimodal approa…
 
Have you heard of the ‘nicotine hypothesis’? That’s the idea put forward by supposed scientific studies that somehow nicotine helped protect people from severe Covid-19 disease. Michael Blaha, a cardiologist at Johns Hopkins and tobacco cessation advocate, says there’s no evidence nicotine is beneficial. Blaha: I think we have pretty solid evidence…
 
Have you heard of the ‘nicotine hypothesis’? That’s the idea put forward by supposed scientific studies that somehow nicotine helped protect people from severe Covid-19 disease. Michael Blaha, a cardiologist at Johns Hopkins and tobacco cessation advocate, says there’s no evidence nicotine is beneficial. Blaha: I think we have pretty solid evidence…
 
Have you heard of the ‘nicotine hypothesis’? That’s the idea put forward by supposed scientific studies that somehow nicotine helped protect people from severe Covid-19 disease. Michael Blaha, a cardiologist at Johns Hopkins and tobacco cessation advocate, says there’s no evidence nicotine is beneficial. Blaha: I think we have pretty solid evidence…
 
What helps people be less susceptible to Covid-19 infection and severe illness? Several recently published scientific papers appear to support the so-called ‘nicotine hypothesis,’ suggesting that nicotine may be beneficial. Micheal Blaha, a cardiologist at Johns Hopkins and tobacco cessation advocate, says this is part of a trend. Blaha: There’s no…
 
What helps people be less susceptible to Covid-19 infection and severe illness? Several recently published scientific papers appear to support the so-called ‘nicotine hypothesis,’ suggesting that nicotine may be beneficial. Micheal Blaha, a cardiologist at Johns Hopkins and tobacco cessation advocate, says this is part of a trend. Blaha: There’s no…
 
What helps people be less susceptible to Covid-19 infection and severe illness? Several recently published scientific papers appear to support the so-called ‘nicotine hypothesis,’ suggesting that nicotine may be beneficial. Micheal Blaha, a cardiologist at Johns Hopkins and tobacco cessation advocate, says this is part of a trend. Blaha: There’s no…
 
What helps people be less susceptible to Covid-19 infection and severe illness? Several recently published scientific papers appear to support the so-called ‘nicotine hypothesis,’ suggesting that nicotine may be beneficial. Micheal Blaha, a cardiologist at Johns Hopkins and tobacco cessation advocate, says this is part of a trend. Blaha: There’s no…
 
If you’ve been diagnosed with cancer of a solid organ, things like prostate or breast, genetic analysis of your tumor may prove to provide important information on the best way to manage your disease, a recent study shows. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, explains. Nelson: They did a study […]…
 
If you’ve been diagnosed with cancer of a solid organ, things like prostate or breast, genetic analysis of your tumor may prove to provide important information on the best way to manage your disease, a recent study shows. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, explains. Nelson: They did a study […]…
 
If you’ve been diagnosed with cancer of a solid organ, things like prostate or breast, genetic analysis of your tumor may prove to provide important information on the best way to manage your disease, a recent study shows. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, explains. Nelson: They did a study […]…
 
Magnetic resonance imaging or MRI is sometimes used to examine the prostate gland when cancer is suspected and a biopsy is being considered. Now a new study demonstrates its benefits. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, explains. Nelson: The advantage to the MRI was that there were a significant number […]…
 
Magnetic resonance imaging or MRI is sometimes used to examine the prostate gland when cancer is suspected and a biopsy is being considered. Now a new study demonstrates its benefits. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, explains. Nelson: The advantage to the MRI was that there were a significant number […]…
 
Magnetic resonance imaging or MRI is sometimes used to examine the prostate gland when cancer is suspected and a biopsy is being considered. Now a new study demonstrates its benefits. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, explains. Nelson: The advantage to the MRI was that there were a significant number […]…
 
Deaths from heart disease declined a lot until the last decade, and then began to level off. Ditto for deaths from certain cancers, a recent study finds. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, says there is a common denominator. Nelson: Certainly I think if you look broadly at cancer mortality […]…
 
Deaths from heart disease declined a lot until the last decade, and then began to level off. Ditto for deaths from certain cancers, a recent study finds. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, says there is a common denominator. Nelson: Certainly I think if you look broadly at cancer mortality […]…
 
Deaths from heart disease declined a lot until the last decade, and then began to level off. Ditto for deaths from certain cancers, a recent study finds. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, says there is a common denominator. Nelson: Certainly I think if you look broadly at cancer mortality […]…
 
Host Connor Newcomb recaps the Baltimore Orioles rough weekend against the Tampa Bay Rays and gives you his three big takeaways from the series: 1) At least the Orioles bullpen was really good in the first two games 2) The Orioles offense really struggles if Cedric Mullins isn't producing 3) Austin Wynns had his moment on Saturday Support Us By Sup…
 
While gun violence has increased in most cities, Richmond, California, has seen a marked decrease in the last decade thanks to an organization that works with the people most likely to be the victims of gun violence: the shooters themselves. Guest host Dr. Daniel Webster, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Violence Prevention and Policy, …
 
Host Connor Newcomb answers your Baltimore Orioles questions on another 'Mailbag' episode. Today's listener questions: 1) If the Orioles got the same offer for each player, would they rather trade Cedric Mullins or Austin Hays? 2) Will Buck Britton be the Orioles next manager at the big league level? Then, Connor previews the upcoming three-game we…
 
The Bloomberg American Health Initiative offers full scholarships for MPH and DrPH degrees to people working on the front lines of key challenges to health in the United States. This special episode of the Initiative's American Health Podcast features an interview with host Shane Bryan and "Bloomberg fellow" Ashley Hickson, a senior policy associat…
 
In this episode, Dr. Josh Sharfstein talks with Hopkins researchers who break down three papers looking at the effectiveness of different COVID-19 vaccines against variants of concern. Carli Jones, a graduate student at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, talks about some good news from a study looking at the effectiveness of Pfizer’s vaccine aga…
 
Hana Salah, Al-Monitor columnist reporting from Gaza, discusses the impact of Israeli restrictions on Gaza’s reconstruction; the lack of clarity on the mechanism for international assistance; why people are flocking to Gaza’s polluted beaches; and how she managed her family life and professional responsibilities while reporting during the bombing.…
 
Host Connor Newcomb compares the Baltimore Orioles 2021 season to the 2020 season at the 60-game mark and looks at how some of the numbers are surprisingly similar. Then, Connor discusses MLB's effort to get "sticky stuff" out of the game and how it could impact the Orioles and possibly John Means. But first, Connor recaps the Orioles 14-1 loss to …
 
Host Connor Newcomb recaps the Baltimore Orioles 10-3 win over the New York Mets from Tuesday night and gives you the five things you need to know from the victory, with thoughts on Bruce Zimmermann, Cedric Mullins, Tyler Wells, and others. Then, Connor breaks down the Orioles roster moves from Tuesday, including the reinstatement of Mac Sceroler f…
 
At the beginning of the pandemic, it seemed like COVID-19 didn’t really affect young people. But a recent uptick in cases and hospitalizations among younger adults could point to the transmissibility of newer variants. Dr. Emily Martin, an epidemiologist at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health, talks with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about h…
 
Dr. Derek Yach, former Executive Director of Noncommunicable Disease and Mental Health at the World Health Organization, is on a mission to create a smoke free world. At the WHO, he worked on the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, the first treaty of its kind, and led the Global Strategy on Diet and Physical Activity. Since this treaty wa…
 
Sarah Szanton, chair of the Patricia M. Davidson Professorship for Health Equity and Social Justice, discusses three key areas of her research: aging, finance in health, and resilience. Follow on Twitter: Sarah Szanton @ sarah_szanton Johns Hopkins School of Nursing @JHUNursing Episode Highlights: 0:23 Dean Davidson worked on getting an endowed cha…
 
Host Connor Newcomb is joined by Millard Shane Thomas, the Host of Locked on Diamondbacks, to talk about the Baltimore Orioles latest waiver claim — INF Domingo Leyba. Connor and Millard talk: -Leyba going 0-for-22 at the plate with the Diamondbacks this season -His 80-game PED suspension in 2020 -What he did at the plate when he was having success…
 
Women and non-Hispanic Black persons were more likely to experience sunburns when taking the blood pressure medicine hydrochlorothiazide than other groups, research by Anna Chien and colleagues at Johns Hopkins has shown. Chien says protecting one’s skin requires a number of strategies. Chien: These days we’re really emphasizing a multimodal approa…
 
Women and non-Hispanic Black persons were more likely to experience sunburns when taking the blood pressure medicine hydrochlorothiazide than other groups, research by Anna Chien and colleagues at Johns Hopkins has shown. Chien says protecting one’s skin requires a number of strategies. Chien: These days we’re really emphasizing a multimodal approa…
 
Women and non-Hispanic Black persons were more likely to experience sunburns when taking the blood pressure medicine hydrochlorothiazide than other groups, research by Anna Chien and colleagues at Johns Hopkins has shown. Chien says protecting one’s skin requires a number of strategies. Chien: These days we’re really emphasizing a multimodal approa…
 
High blood pressure is known to increase the risk for heart attack and stroke, so treating it is important, and often starts with medicines like hydrochlorothiazide. Yet research by Anna Chien and colleagues at Johns Hopkins has shown that for some groups of people taking this medicine, sunburns do occur more often and these are […]…
 
High blood pressure is known to increase the risk for heart attack and stroke, so treating it is important, and often starts with medicines like hydrochlorothiazide. Yet research by Anna Chien and colleagues at Johns Hopkins has shown that for some groups of people taking this medicine, sunburns do occur more often and these are […]…
 
High blood pressure is known to increase the risk for heart attack and stroke, so treating it is important, and often starts with medicines like hydrochlorothiazide. Yet research by Anna Chien and colleagues at Johns Hopkins has shown that for some groups of people taking this medicine, sunburns do occur more often and these are […]…
 
High blood pressure is known to increase the risk for heart attack and stroke, so treating it is important, and often starts with medicines like hydrochlorothiazide. Yet research by Anna Chien and colleagues at Johns Hopkins has shown that for some groups of people taking this medicine, sunburns do occur more often and these are […]…
 
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