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The Global Thinkers Project, Oxford was launched in 2017 with the aim of reviving silenced voices in the discipline of International Relations (IR). It explores the internationalist thought of individuals who have made significant contributions in international affairs but have been excluded from the discipline due to biases of language, region, and gender. By encouraging IR to 'rethink its thinkers', our project responds to a call for a more inclusive, diverse, and ‘Global IR’, making Oxfor ...
 
The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography's SoundCloud channel introduces you to notable men and women who've shaped the British past, worldwide. The biographies cover all walks of British life - including literature, the arts, sport, politics, business, and science - and range from pre-history to the 21st century. The stories are selected from the 60,000 lives within the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. The Dictionary is the national record of people who've left their mark on Brit ...
 
The Stubbs Society for Defence and Foreign Affairs, founded in 1884, is Oxford University's oldest society dedicated to the study and discussion of global politics and international relations. Join us in our new regular podcast series as we sit down with leading figures from international relations, diplomacy, intelligence, the armed forces and British and global politics.
 
The inaugural Oxford-India Day took place on 17 June 2011. The event aimed to celebrate the longstanding and varied links between the University and India, and to reinvigorate and strengthen those links. Over 80 external guests, representing Indian business, Indian government, UK government, Indian civil society, journalism, law and academia came to Oxford, exploring cutting-edge collaborative research; the students and staff who have come to Oxford from India; and the outstanding collection ...
 
Audio from New Mandala, a forum for anecdote, analysis, and new perspectives on Southeast Asia since 2006. Hosted by the Australian National University's Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs. Subscribe to us on iTunes or the Apple Podcasts app: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/id1360166063
 
Professor of Poetry Alice Oswald gives her lectures on poetry, language, literature, beauty and life every term. The Professor of Poetry lectures were conceived in 1708 by Berkshire landowner Henry Birkhead and began after he bequeathed some money so it could be a valuable supplement to the curriculum. He believed ‘the reading of the ancient poets gave keenness and polish to the minds of young men as well as to the advancement of more serious literature both sacred and human’. The first poet ...
 
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show series
 
Lockdowns, social distancing, restrictions on 'normal' activities - we've all been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. But how has it impacted on our mood and mental wellbeing? We chat to Dr Maxime Taquet from the Department of Psychiatry about 'mood homeostasis' (the interplay between people's activities and the way they feel), and how this has bee…
 
For World Press Freedom Day we look at the pressures on independent journalism in two EU countries In this episode of our podcast we talk to two of our Journalist Fellows about the growing pressures facing journalists and independent news media in Poland and Hungary. We look at the threats of authoritarianism, the weaponisation of advertising reven…
 
Their distinctive 'teacher teacher' call is synonymous with British gardens, but great tits are facing a big problem - climate change. As our springtime becomes warmer and begins earlier, peak caterpillar abundance is also shifting earlier. As a crucial food source for great tit chicks, this is cause for concern. In this episode of the Big Question…
 
The academic fields of both environmental history and future studies originated in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s during the rise of the mainstream environmental movement. On today’s episode of The Oxford Comment, we are joined by environmental historian Erin Stewart Mauldin, author Unredeemed Land: An Environmental History of Civil War and Emanc…
 
Remember those days when it was possible to climb aboard a plane and jet off around the world? Well, while we might be yearning for foreign shores, there's no denying that air travel comes with a big ol' carbon footprint. But is it possible to make aeroplanes 'greener'? We chat to Dr Chiara Falsetti, a researcher at the Oxford Thermofluids Institut…
 
U Dhammaloka is now the subject of a fascinating new book, The Irish Buddhist: The Forgotten Monk Who Faced Down the British Empire (Oxford University Press, 2020) cowritten by Alicia Turner, Laurence Cox, and Brian Bocking. Beyond the story of this intrepid Irishman, this book is also a social history of British Burma at the height of European imp…
 
The moon may be the closest planetary body to us, but we still have a lot to learn about it. For example, what is the water-cycle like on an airless body such as the moon? How much water can be found there, and could we one day utilise this water for space exploration? In this episode of the Big Questions Podcast, we chat to Dr Katherine Shirley, a…
 
Last episode of The Oxford Comment, we talked about Open Access and the importance of the accessibility of academic research for the betterment of society. This episode, we are joined by Himanshu Jha, the author of Capturing Institutional Change: The Case of the Right to Information Act in India, and Vivien A. Schmidt, the author of Europe’s Crisis…
 
We're over a year into the coronavirus pandemic, and it's affected our lives in many ways - including, for many of us, how we sleep. You may have experienced changes to your sleep pattern (particularly if you waved goodbye to your commute last March), your quality of sleep, or even had some very weird or vivid dreams! If so, you're not alone. Join …
 
Anyone who has taken any interest in the politics of Thailand at all in the last two decades could not help but have noticed the part that the country’s judiciary has played in them. Whereas before the 2000s the courts had at best a peripheral role in political life there, in recent years judges have at times weighed in dramatically on high-stakes …
 
In this episode we speak to to three women journalists from Kyrgyzstan, India and Indonesia discuss female representation in the news media, why they got into journalism, and how to ensure women’s voices and interests are heard. In this episode of our Future of Journalism podcast we speak to to three women journalists from Kyrgyzstan, India and Ind…
 
If you've ever been lucky enough to hear a lion roar (whether that's at the zoo or in the wild - hopefully at a safe distance!), you'll know that it's a truly bone-shaking experience. But do lions have a unique roar, or do they all sound the same? How could knowing this help with conservation efforts? Join us for this episode of the Big Questions p…
 
It's fifty years since the publication of From the Life and Songs of the Crow (by Ted Hughes). This is a lecture about lines and other sound barriers and how Crow flies straight through them. Alice Oswald is the current Professor of Poetry at the Faculty of English. She took up her post in September 2019. Alice Oswald’s first two lectures as Profes…
 
In this episode of our 'Future of Journalism' podcast, we look at the values that drive a thriving membership model at an Argentinean news site We talk to one of Latin America's most senior journalists Chani Guyot whose news website RED/ACCIÓN runs a successful membership model that goes beyond being a revenue stream. We look at how the news outlet…
 
In this year's Valentine's episode, we're exploring one of the most special relationships around. That's right - the one between us and our dogs! We often hear pooches described as "(wo)man's best friend", but for how long has this been the case? Join Prof Greger Larson, an expert in palaeogenomics and bio-archaeology, as we journey back thousands …
 
It's a question that's on the lips of politicians, scientists and policy-makers right across the globe - who should get the COVID-19 vaccine first? Should it be the elderly and clinically vulnerable, healthcare professionals and other frontline workers, or another group entirely? We chat to Dr Alberto Giubilini, a philosopher at the Oxford Uehiro C…
 
On this episode of The Oxford Comment, Rhiannon Meaden, a Senior Publisher for Journals at OUP, and Danny Altmann, editor-in-chief of Oxford Open Immunology, cover the basics of Open Access, OUP’s drive to disseminate academic research as widely as possible, and how easily-accessible research has impacted various academic fields around the world. T…
 
In this episode of our podcast we delve into our survey of 234 digital leaders in 43 countries to look at the major trends that will influence journalism in the year ahead. In this episode of our podcast we delve into our survey of 234 digital leaders in 43 countries to look at the major trends that will influence journalism in the year ahead. We l…
 
Is it possible to edit someone's genes before they are born to make them a nicer, kinder, more moral person? Not only that - but, importantly, should we do this? When it comes to gene editing for moral enhancement, there are many ethical points to consider. Join us as we chat to Tess Johnson, a Philosophy PhD student at the Oxford Uehiro Centre for…
 
Following the suspension or barring of Donald Trump by many of the largest social media and tech platforms, after his supporters stormed the Capitol building in January 2021, we explore the issues surrounding these decisions. Following the suspension or barring of Donald Trump by many of the largest social media and tech platforms, after his suppor…
 
Most of us have probably heard of video games being described as "addictive", but is there evidence of this? Are they damaging to our mental health, or could they actually have a positive impact on our metal wellbeing? In this episode of the Big Questions podcast we're booting up our consoles, and asking Prof Andrew Przybylski, Director of Research…
 
In this final Future of Journalism podcast of the year, members of our senior leadership team reflect on this momentous year for journalism and what we can perhaps look forward to next year 2020 has been a year like no other. World-changing events including the COVID-19 pandemic, the movement for racial justice, a fractious U.S. presidential electi…
 
It's that time of year - the festive jumpers are going on, the lights are going up, and we're ready to decorate our Christmas trees. But when it comes to choosing your fir, what do you go for - real or fake? Perhaps you have a trusty old family-favourite that comes down from the attic each year? Or maybe going to choose a real tree gets you into th…
 
Journalists from some of Scandinavia's leading news publishers discuss their organisations' premium news strategies, the value of lifestyle news and the false dichotomy of hard/soft news, and the role of gender. Journalists from some of Scandinavia's leading news publishers discuss their organisations' premium news strategies, the value of lifestyl…
 
Two authors of the first report from our Trust in News Project discuss how partisanship, transparency and other factors may contribute to trust in news, and what outstanding questions need exploring. Two authors of the first report from our Trust in News Project discuss how partisanship, transparency and other factors may contribute to trust in new…
 
In a chat with Rasmus Nielsen, Alan Rusbridger, former Editor-in-Chief of the Guardian, argues journalists should be more transparent and rethink their relationship with their audience Our host is Rasmus Nielsen, Director of the Reuters Institute. Our guest is Alan Rusbridger, former Editor-in-Chief of The Guardian and Principal of Lady Margaret Ha…
 
Did you know that the winner of the 2019/2020 Fantasy Premier League, beating over 7 million other players, was Dr Joshua Bull - a researcher at Oxford's Mathematical Institute? How did he win? Turns out that 'mathematical thinking' and a strategic approach, combined with "gut instinct and a healthy dose of good luck" might just be the answer! Coul…
 
Author of a new report into the trends around news podcasts during the COVID-19 pandemic Nic Newman discusses his findings. How successful are these podcasts? What different formats exist? What do news outlets need to consider? Host: Federica Cherubini is Head of Leadership Development at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. She is an…
 
Singapore’s history has generally been represented through a linear, upward trajectory “from Third World to the First,” in the words of the postcolonial state’s founding father Lee Kuan Yew. In his book Singapore: A Modern History (Bloomsbury, 2020), Michael D. Barr synthesizes a story that complicates this progress narrative and critiques the foun…
 
We've probably all heard the phrase 'Big Brother is watching you' (a reference to the fictional character in George Orwell's dystopian novel '1984') - but are we really under constant surveillance? Is it actually possible to be a fully functioning member of modern society without being tracked by some sort of surveillance system? And how is technol…
 
Rasmus Nielsen speaks to Federica Cherubini about her report looking at the central challenges facing news organisations in 2020 according to a survey of 136 newsroom leaders from around the world Rasmus Nielsen speaks to Federica Cherubini about her report looking at the central challenges facing news organisations in 2020 according to a survey of…
 
Kathy English, former public editor of the Toronto Star, discusses what public editors do, their role in ensuring accountability to readers, and how reader engagement via public editors has changed over the years. Meera Selva speaks to Kathy English, former public editor of the Toronto Star, about what public editors do, their role in ensuring acco…
 
Rebecca Skippage, leader of the BBC’s Disinformation Team, discusses it's efforts to address mis/disinformation, its decisions about weighing in on misleading or false information and the disinformation unit’s relations with the rest of the BBC Meera Selva speaks with Rebecca Skippage who leads the BBC’s Disinformation Team. They discuss the broadc…
 
'Influencers' are here like never before...log on to social media, and there will be someone there to tell you what to cook or what to wear...But what about when it comes to wildlife conservation? For instance, how much impact can a celebrity have when it comes to saving an endangered species? In this episode of the Oxford Sparks Big Questions Podc…
 
Federica Cherubini speaks with Rasmus Nielsen and Richard Fletcher, two of the authors of a recent report about the coronavirus communication crisis in the UK. Federica Cherubini speaks with Rasmus Nielsen and Richard Fletcher, two of the authors of a recent report about the coronavirus communication crisis in the UK. The report stresses that a lar…
 
On this episode of The Oxford Comment, we spoke with three scholars who specialize in electoral intervention, voter turnout, and voting laws. Caroline Tolbert and Michael Ritter, co-authors of Accessible Elections: How the States Can Help Americans Vote, and Dov Levin, author of Meddling in the Ballot Box: The Causes and Effects of Partisan Elector…
 
We're back with a brand new series of the 'Oxford Sparks Big Questions Podcast'! And - in the Autumn of 2020 - where else could we start but with an episode answering a big question related to COVID-19? We're all used to hearing a lot of pandemic terminology now, but it can be difficult to get to grips with exactly what all these terms mean. For in…
 
The tail end of the twentieth century was a good time for constitutional lawyers. Leapfrogging around the globe, they offered advice on how to amend, write or rewrite one state constitution after the next following the collapse of the Soviet Union and with it, the communist bloc. Largely overlooked in the flurry of constitution drafting in this per…
 
Repost: Roman David and Ian Holliday join us on New Books in Southeast Asian Studies to talk about limited liberalism in Myanmar and beyond, about trust in government and the Coronavirus pandemic, prospects for transitional justice, and about doing survey and interview research on politics in Myanmar in the 2010s.Like this interview? If so you migh…
 
On this episode of The Oxford Comment, we spoke with three scholars involved in the launch of the upcoming Oxford Bibliographies in Urban Studies. Editor-in-Chief Richard Dilworth and authors Zack Taylor (“Toronto”) and James Mansell (“Urban Soundscapes”) discussed the new OBO subject at large, their individual contributions, and attempted to answe…
 
The Stubbs society is delighted to welcome Sir Mark Lyall Grant, the former UK National Security Adviser and Ambassador and Permanent Representative to the United Nations, to our summer podcast series. Sir Mark is a former senior civil servant whose career in the Foreign Office stretched across four decades. Besides his roles in the United Nations …
 
In this week's episode, Stubbs Society Development Officer Zehra Munir sat down with Catherine Lutz, the Director of the Watson Institute’s Costs of War study. They discussed a number of pressing issues, including the ‘Costs of War’ project she is involved with, the issues with ‘feminist’ foreign intervention, the ‘language of war’ used to talk abo…
 
We all feel pain differently. What to one person may be the worst pain in the world, might be a mild irritation to another person; but why? At the moment, we don’t have a thorough understanding of how pain is processed, meaning it is difficult to devise treatments for chronic pain. In this episode of the ‘Big Questions’ podcast, we are lucky enough…
 
In this week's episode, Stubbs Society President Joe Davies sat down with Steve L. Hall, a former CIA Moscow Station Chief, to discuss Putin's Russia and 21st century espionage. They discussed a number of pressing issues, including Russian meddling in the 2016 election; the GRU putting bounties on British and American soldiers in Afghanistan; the R…
 
This episode focuses on the how people get news about climate change and how this differs across different countries, age brackets and attitudes towards the issue. Authors of the Digital News Report, the most comprehensive study of news consumption trends worldwide, discuss the key findings from this year's report. This episode focuses on the how p…
 
In the first episode of our new podcast series, Stubbs Society President Joe Davies sat down with Principal Deputy Assistant US Secretary of State for Near Eastern Affairs Joey Hood to discuss US policy towards the Middle East region. They discussed a number of pressing issues, including US support for the Saudi-led coalition in Yemen; the assassin…
 
Things have changed a lot over the past few months – including, for many of us, our daily routine. But how has this impacted our energy usage? In this week’s episode of the Big Questions podcast, we chat to Dr Philipp Grünewald from Oxford’s Environmental Change Institute about his ‘JoyMeter’ survey, which has given a fascinating insight into how o…
 
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