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From the Aircraft Electronics Association, AEA Amplified is a podcast for aviation’s technology experts. Learn more about the ever-changing world of avionics technologies from industry professionals and aviation enthusiasts. Subscribe to AEA Amplified on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Podbean or Spotify. Founded in 1957, the AEA represents nearly 1,300 member companies in more than 40 countries, including government-certified international repair stations specializing in maintenance, repai ...
 
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show series
 
Right-wing radio has served as a megaphone for populist outrage in America. Talk-show hosts like Alex Jones and the late Rush Limbaugh have railed against cultural elites, promoted baseless claims of election fraud, stoked a backlash against immigrants, and questioned the effectiveness of masks and vaccinations amid the Covid-19 pandemic. How and t…
 
Avidyne Corp. recently introduced its all-new Vantage Flight Display System. Designed for forward-fit and retrofit applications in a variety of display formats, the company’s first certification of Vantage displays will be as a retrofit for Cirrus aircraft equipped with the Entegra PFD and MFD flight deck. An AEA member company since 1995, Avidyne’…
 
COVID-19 has reshaped work in numerous ways. Many fortunate white-collar Americans spent the last year working from home. Others in service-oriented jobs lost work or spent their workdays behind masks and plexiglass. These pandemic-related changes have been especially hard on women, according to a paper in the Journal of Economic Perspectives. Econ…
 
Tax evasion costs the United States hundreds of billions of dollars every year. But for some Americans, hiding income from the government is about more than keeping every possible penny they earned for themselves. It’s also a form of political protest. In a paper in the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, authors Julie Berry Cullen, Nichola…
 
For a military intervention to end successfully, foreign forces have to hand off security to domestic forces. But historically, these transitions have rarely gone well. In a paper in the American Economic Review, political scientist Austin L. Wright examined the impact of NATO troop withdrawals from Afghanistan on insurgent violence and local perce…
 
**Editor's note: This is a rebroadcast of an interview from 2019. College sports have become big business, and everybody’s making money except the players. The National Collegiate Athletic Association prohibits “student athletes” from receiving a cut of the millions of dollars in revenue that schools collect from games and product licensing. Instea…
 
Culture is shaped by the conditions in which humans live. As societies modernize, their cultural traditions will change too. But it’s difficult to identify what is driving those changes and what role public policy may be playing. In a paper in the American Economic Review, UCLA professor Natalie Bau investigated how the introduction of a formal pen…
 
Police officers have a lot of discretion in how they enforce the law, but they are not always evenhanded in how they employ their judgement. In a paper in the American Economic Review, Dartmouth College economist Steven Mello examined variations in speeding enforcement by officers with the Florida Highway Patrol.. He and coauthor Felipe Goncalves f…
 
A lot has changed since the first economics papers on LGBTQ issues appeared in the mid-1990s. The volume of research in this area has grown significantly. There is more awareness of an expanding array of identities and a broader push to root out discrimination within the economics profession. Lee Badgett wrote some of those early foundational paper…
 
Can economists trust their models? How does their data drive their conclusions? These are some of the big questions that motivate econometrician Isaiah Andrews. The Harvard professor was awarded this year’s John Bates Clark Medal for his contributions to econometric theory and empirical practice. And while Andrews works on some of the most technica…
 
The 64th annual AEA International Convention & Trade Show is the place to be for avionics training, networking, new product introductions and more. The four-day event takes place at the Hilton Anatole in Dallas, Texas, June 22-25, 2021. Avionics technicians and small-business owners will reconnect with their manufacturer and distributor representat…
 
There was a time not long ago when most economists tended to work by themselves. In 1960, fewer than one in five economics journal articles had more than one author. Today, about three quarters of all papers are produced by research teams. The shift toward collaboration has a lot of upsides for economists, including producing higher impact papers, …
 
The first private prison in the United States opened in 1984 amidst the war on drugs and overcrowding in public prisons. Now a multi-billion dollar industry, private prisons incarcerate about 8 percent of all America's inmates. In a paper in the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, University of Wisconsin-Madison economist Anita Mukherjee ex…
 
The countdown to AirVenture Oshkosh 2021 is in full swing, and EAA Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board Jack Pelton offers a preview into the World’s Greatest Aviation Celebration. While some areas may look different at Oshkosh this year, the feeling will be the same as the aviation community reunites to celebrate flight. Tune in for a…
 
More than 50 years ago, a revolution in seed and fertilizer technology bolstered food production and economic well-being in Asia and Latin America. Unfortunately, this “Green Revolution” left sub-Saharan Africa behind. At the turn of the 21st century, many farmers still were struggling to produce enough food to feed their communities. Then, in 2006…
 
In 2021, EDMO Distributors is celebrating the golden anniversary of its everyday embodiment of its motto, “Quality and Excellence, Whatever it Takes,” in serving the thousands of civilian, commercial, and military avionics shops with a multitude of products and components. Named the AEA Associate Member of the Year in 2020, EDMO now stocks more tha…
 
At the turn of the 19th century, American universities were mostly under-resourced, regional schools. By World War II, they had become research leaders on the global stage, attracting the world's best scientists. In a paper in the Journal of Economic Perspectives, economists W. Bentley MacLeod and Miguel Urquiola say that the US universities’ ascen…
 
Nobel Prize winner William Nordhaus has called climate change “the ultimate challenge for economics.” Economists increasingly have been trying to understand how rising tides and global temperatures will impact resource allocation around the globe, as well as the potential policy tools that can help curb damage to our natural world. SMU professor Kl…
 
After a failed revolution in 1848, hundreds of Germans were expelled from their home country and settled in the US. It was not obvious that this eclectic group would play an important role in American politics and change the course of the nation. Their words and leadership helped President Lincoln and the North win the Civil War, according to a pap…
 
Democrats may control the White House and Congress, but Republicans have a clear advantage on the nation’s highest court. Sixteen of the last 20 appointments to the Supreme Court have been GOP nominees, including six of nine sitting justices. Critics say that this has caused an imbalance of power that threatens the court’s legitimacy. University of…
 
An AEA member company since 1981, Mid-Continent Instruments and Avionics recently introduced the Flex MD23 Series that features a customizable configuration (inputs and outputs), user interface and graphics, enabling it to function as a custom display, controller and data converter. The 2-inch digital instrument can be customized to receive and dis…
 
Companies like Amazon, Microsoft, and Google are pushing today’s technology frontier. And critical to their enterprises are economists who’ve honed their skills at universities. In the Winter 2019 issue of the Journal of Economic Perspectives, economists Susan Athey and Michael Luca outlined this growing, mutual influence between economics and the …
 
Want to open an FAA-certified Part 145 repair station? Learn from the experts who recently did it from scratch. Cris Owens, accountable manager for Qmulus Aviation, along with the company’s owner, Sean Wilke, provide valuable insight on how they successfully opened a startup business in Caldwell, Idaho. Get to know these aviation technology experts…
 
In the US, most students enroll in their neighborhood school. But sometimes, they have a choice. Families might be given vouchers for other public or private institutions further from their homes. Policymakers’ hope is that kids in underperforming schools won’t be limited by where they can afford to live. Harvard professor Chris Avery says that the…
 
Friedrich Hayek is one of the giants of 20th century economics. He did important work on everything from business cycles to psychology, earning a Nobel Prize in economics in 1974. However, Hayek is perhaps best known for his book, The Road to Serfdom. Since its publication in 1944, many leaders and politicians have cited it as a proof that countrie…
 
Susan Windle Beam has professionally served the avionics industry for more than three decades. As the manager of Accessory Services Inc. in Anchorage, Alaska, her shop recently received Federal Aviation Administration approvals to add Class 1, 2, and 3 radio capabilities – communications, navigation and radar, respectively – for limited airframe an…
 
Schools are academic institutions. But they are not only that. They are also social spaces that are critical to children’s development. Whether inside the classroom or out on the playground, kids learn how to problem solve, to adapt, persevere, and resolve conflicts. And those schools that are best at fostering these skills are setting their studen…
 
Simply giving cash with a few strings attached could be one of the most promising ways to reduce poverty and insecurity in the developing world. Today, over 63 countries have at least one such program. And while these policies have been around for a few decades, little is known about how much so-called conditional cash transfers (CCT) improve peopl…
 
It’s well documented that women earn less than men for doing the same job. But the pay gap is just one way in which women are economically disadvantaged. In some countries, women cannot work without their husband’s permission. They have restricted access to credit and are effectively penalized for having children. And this discrimination is not jus…
 
Mac and David Copeland share their family’s unique aviation history in this episode of AEA Amplified. Mac is following in big family footsteps as a third-generation pilot. He recently completed his first solo while attending college and working toward his private pilot certificate. His father, David, is the vice president of sales for Mid-Continent…
 
More and more of the wealth in the richest countries is going to their richest citizens. And there are no signs that it’s stopping. But how inequality has grown—who it’s affecting and why—has changed significantly over the last four decades, according to a paper in the Fall issue of the Journal of Economic Perspectives. Authors Florian Hoffmann, Da…
 
Chris Bartlett, president of CCX Technologies, discusses his company’s wide range of cybersecurity and testing solutions for avionics OEMs, aircraft maintainers and military contractors. Based in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, the company’s T-RX Avionics Radio and Pulse Tester family of products are stand-alone tablets that help maintainers and installer…
 
Epidemiology used to be a quiet discipline whose experts were not much used to being in the public eye. Then COVID-19 happened. Suddenly, epidemiologists everywhere were being called into service to track the virus and formulate a plan to combat its spread. But Boston University epidemiologist Eleanor Murray says there are a lot of questions about …
 
The GOP has owned the US South, winning a majority of the region’s votes in every presidential election for the past 40 years. But it wasn’t always this way. The so-called “Solid South” used to vote reliably Democratic. So what happened? Most scholars believe it was backlash to Civil Rights legislation of the 1960s. Still, even today, the question …
 
The gap between red and blue America has been expanding for decades, and the consequences of this increasing polarization are clear to close oberserves of Washington But why Americans have grown so far apart in the first place is still a complicated, unanswered question. Part of the story appears to be the sudden rise of China as an export powerhou…
 
Populism’s rise has sparked fundamental questions for advanced democracies around the world. Perhaps the biggest question is why it’s happening. Some research points to economic explanations. Americans who gravitated to President Trump’s nationalistic appeals and British voters who approved leaving the European Union were frustrated by job losses a…
 
Thom Duncan, president of Thom Duncan Avionics in Fayetteville, Tennessee, has been fixing electronics since childhood. Since opening a shop at the Fayetteville Municipal Airport in December 2018, he has led a rapidly growing business that specializes in avionics for single- and twin-engine aircraft. Get to know one of aviation’s technology experts…
 
The IRS knows that taxpayers hide a large chunk of their wealth overseas. According to the best estimates, Americans hold more than a trillion dollars in offshore tax havens. But it's not easy to find those secret accounts and make tax dodgers pay their fair share. In the August issue of the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, Daniel Reck s…
 
John Uczekaj, president & CEO of Aspen Avionics, details the company’s agreement in principle to become a member of the AIRO Group of companies. What does Aspen’s move mean to general aviation and its customers around the world? Uczekaj answers that question and more in this episode of AEA Amplified.…
 
The US spends nearly $50 billion a year on job-creating business incentives. Unfortunately, a lot of this money doesn’t go to the places that need it most. Upjohn Institute senior economist Tim Bartik says that policymakers must do more to invest in distressed regions. In the Journal of Economic Perspectives, he argues that policymakers could get m…
 
In the inaugural episode of AEA Amplified, a podcast for aviation's technology experts, host Geoff Hill speaks with AEA President & CEO Mike Adamson to discuss the AEA's path forward for the return of in-person association and industry events. Tune in for an informative status update on the association, the training classes taking place at AEA head…
 
Black, Latinx, and Native American people are badly underrepresented in economics. In 2017, they were 30 percent of the US population, but earned fewer than 10 percent of economics PhDs. The question now facing economists is why minorities are opting for other careers. To find out, Gary Hoover of the University of Oklahoma reached out to minorities…
 
This week marks the centennial of women’s enfranchisement in the United States and women have never been so politically powerful—or politically divided with men. The “sex gap” in partisanship and voter turnout continues to widen. Once willing to defer the work of politics to men, women now have a 4 percentage point advantage in voter turnout. The p…
 
The amount of money in politics seems to grow every year. Spending by outside groups reached a record of half billion dollars in the 2016 elections cycle, and lobbying expenditures regularly exceed $3 billion annually. But economists Marianne Bertrand and Matilde Bombardini argue that a lot of corporate influence is still overlooked. In the July is…
 
Even before there was President Trump, there was “the wall.” America has spent billions on border enforcement, which includes a barrier between the US and Mexico. And the current administration’s nationalistic promises to put “America first” have given the border wall heightened symbolic importance. But it’s not clear just how effective it is in ac…
 
The world has been adjusting to the information age for the last 50 years now. And so have its autocracies, according to our guest today. Daniel Treisman, political scientist at UCLA, says that illiberal leaders are building modern authoritarian regimes with a new set of tools to keep themselves in power. In the Fall 2019 issue of the Journal of Ec…
 
Swarthmore professor Amanda Bayer has worked much of her career to address diversity in economics. She has published papers about it, served on the AEA’s Committee on the Status of Minority Groups in the Economics Profession, and co-organized a national summit on the topic with the Federal Reserve. She is also the creator and editor of Diversifying…
 
The economics profession is in a moment of racial reckoning. A field still dominated by white men is rethinking long-held notions about racial discrimination and its impact on the profession. That includes the way that the issue is studied. Harvard professor Mario Small says that sociology can help. There is a lot about how institutional discrimina…
 
Few economists have shed as much light on the long-run impact of institutions as Melissa Dell. Her efforts, which earned her this year’s John Bates Clark Medal, have helped pinpoint some of the root causes of poverty and insecurity around the world. Her research stands out for the novel datasets she’s collected and the innovative ways she’s put the…
 
For-profit colleges hope to be profitable again. Years of intense regulatory scrutiny over high student loan default rates and lawsuits over boiler room recruiting tactics resulted in rapid enrollment declines, revenue losses, and a wave of closings. But now, with a sympathetic Education Department and skyrocketing demand for online education amid …
 
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