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Welcome to Tony Sam's Word of the Day Podcast! You may think you know what words mean, but YOU DON'T! Lucky for you, Tony Sam DOES. Tony Sam graduated magna cum laude from the Harvard School of Law and has been fascinated with the evolution of the English language as far back as he can remember. Currently serving as a Judge in the 23rd Circuit Court of Illinois, he finds time to learn more about words whenever he’s not walking his prized Labrador, Marshall. His other accolades include gradua ...
 
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Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 5, 2022 is: cantankerous • \kan-TANK-uh-rus\ • adjective A cantankerous person is often angry and annoyed. Cantankerous also means “difficult or irritating to deal with.” // Several sportswriters cited the coach’s cantankerous personality as a reason for the team’s poor performance and lack of motivation. …
 
Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia による
 
Inspissate is a verb that means to thicken or congeal. The Latin word spissus (SPEE soos) means ‘think’ or ‘dense.’ Inspissate has been with English since the early 17th century and has maintained the same meaning. Here’s an example: It was fun to make maple syrup, but I feel we needed to inspissate it a little. Personally, I’ve always liked my syr…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 4, 2022 is: Yankee • \YANG-kee\ • noun Yankee can refer broadly to anyone born or living in the U.S., or it can refer more narrowly only to those in the northern U.S., or even more narrowly, only to those in the states of New England. The broadest use is especially common outside the U.S. // It took the ch…
 
Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia による
 
Caducous is an adjective that means easily detached and shed. The Latin word caducus (cah DOO coos) means ‘liable to fall.’ Our word of the day entered the English language in the late 17th century with a meaning related mostly to botany. Here’s an example: It’s lovely to watch these plants bud at this time of year, especially to see the buds fall …
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 3, 2022 is: teem • \TEEM\ • verb To teem with something is to be full of that thing, or to have much of that thing inside. // The river teems with fish. // The students' minds were teeming with ideas. See the entry > Examples: "Emily Wells' orchestral pop teems with grandly despairing gestures—synth tones …
 
Obtestation is a noun that refers to the act of protesting. The word obtest is a synonym of protest. Our word of the day is the noun variation of this. Here’s an example of obtestation in use: We didn’t understand Helen’s obtestation of playing classical music in the office. We had always thought of her as a fan of this genre and here she was prote…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 2, 2022 is: apposite • \AP-uh-zit\ • adjective Apposite is used to describe what is very appropriate, or what is suitable for an occasion or situation. It is a synonym of apt. // Before sending the final draft of his novel to his editor, Lyle searched for an apposite quotation that could serve as the book'…
 
Ravelment is a noun that means confusion or entanglement. The word ravel is of middle English descent and it means to tangle something. When we ravel words we create ravelment — or confusion — in people’s heads. Tommy’s complicated explanation created nothing but revalment. Instead of making sense of things, it only caused more bewilderment.…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 1, 2022 is: debunk • \dee-BUNK\ • verb To debunk something, such as a story, theory, or idea, is to show or expose the falseness of it. // The article thoroughly debunks the notion that life exists on Mars. See the entry > Examples: "The idea that dogs spend every waking moment trying to usurp their human …
 
Perambulate is a verb that means to travel around in a leisurely way. The Latin word ambulare (ohm boo LAR ay) means walk, while the prefix P-E-R means ‘all over.’ When we perambulate through an area, we stroll through all of it at a leisurely pace. Our trip to Paris was fun, but it was a little too rushed. We didn’t have time to perambulate throug…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 30, 2022 is: scintillate • \SIN-tuh-layt\ • verb Scintillate means "to dazzle or impress with liveliness or wit." // Her hilarious and topical standup routine absolutely scintillated; the audience brought her back for two encores. See the entry > Examples: “Kimberly Marable's scarred Persephone, torn as Ha…
 
Glottal is an adjective that means producing a sound from the glottis. The Greek word glottis refers to ‘the tongue.’ After being imported into English, it’s meaning shifted to refer to the larynx, a part of the vocal cords that effect voice modulation. To make a glottal sound is to make a sound that involves this part of the body. This often can r…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 29, 2022 is: duress • \dur-RESS\ • noun Duress, which is typically used with under, refers to force or threats meant to make someone do something. It is used especially of unlawful constraint. // The defense asserts that the defendant's confession was made under duress. See the entry > Examples: "The ordin…
 
Osculate is a verb that means to kiss. The Latin word osculum (OH skew loom) means ‘little mouth’ or ‘kiss.’ Although it has a more formal, separate meaning in mathematics, it is also used informally to refer to a kiss. Here’s an example: After studying medicine for years, I found myself drowning in Latin. Things got particularly weird when I came …
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 28, 2022 is: fulsome • \FULL-sum\ • adjective Fulsome can be a positive term, as when it's used to mean "abundant, copious," or "full and well developed," but it has negative meanings too, such as "overdone" and "excessively flattering." // The photographs celebrate the island's fulsome biodiversity. // Wh…
 
Bumptious is an adjective that means self-assertive to annoying degree. It’s no coincidence that the first four letters in our word of the day come to the word ‘bump.’ Its origin is that it combines the word ‘bump’ with the word ‘fractious’ to means someone whose self-assertive personality can rub — or bump — people the wrong way. Here’s an example…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 27, 2022 is: jingoism • \JING-goh-iz-im\ • noun Jingoism is excessive patriotism or nationalism, especially when marked by a belligerent foreign policy. // When the war began many people were caught up in a wave of jingoism. See the entry > Examples: "War is bad for culture. Not least of all because it tur…
 
Selenography is a noun that refers to the mapping of the moon. In Greek mythology Selene is the goddess of the moon. In recent years her name has been adopted for for words that refer to the moon. For selenography, the suffix G-R-A-P-H-Y has been added to created a word specifically related to geography of the moon. Here’s an example of selenograph…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 26, 2022 is: culminate • \KUL-muh-nayt\ • verb Culminate usually means “to reach the highest or a climactic or decisive point,” or "to reach the end or final result of something." // The festivities will culminate with a spectacular display of fireworks. // The partnership between the two songwriters culmi…
 
Banausic is an adjective that means serving utilitarian purposes only. Our word of the day comes from a Greek word banausikos (bah NO see kose) which means ‘of or for artisans.’ It must be remembered that artisans of the ancient world mostly created art for utilitarian purposes, things like vases and furniture. In time, banausic came to mean anythi…
 
Pyrite is a noun that refers to a ‘fools’ gold’ or something that appears valuable but is worthless. The Greek word pur (PU er) means fire. In addition to being the origin of such words as pyromania, it is also the basis of our word of the day. Pyrite usually refers to a shiny yellow mineral that was often mistaken for gold in the 19th century. But…
 
Scattergram is a noun that refers to a diagram used to compare two variables. Coming from two common English words, scattergram is a synonym of a scatter diagram, that may be preferable because it rolls off the tongue faster and easier. Here’s an example of it in use: I used a scattergram to compare the different factors that has caused our team to…
 
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