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The University of Oxford is home to an impressive range and depth of research activities in the Humanities. TORCH | The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities is a major new initiative that seeks to build on this heritage and to stimulate and support research that transcends disciplinary and institutional boundaries. Here we feature some of the networks and programmes, as well as recordings of events, and offer insights into the research that they make possible.
 
A bi-weekly policy podcast based out of the Blavatnik School of Government at the University of Oxford. The Oxford Policy Pod explores pressing policy issues around the globe and is produced by students reading for a Master of Public Policy at the Blavatnik School of Government. The podcast explores contemporary policy challenges that policymakers face all over the world, and taps into the rich diversity of policy experience and insights of the student body and faculty. The executive produce ...
 
Every year more than 10 million children under the age of five die in developing countries, nearly a million from malaria alone. Every day more than 2500 people die of malaria, most of them children. These are the statistics that help drive the tenacious work of Oxford researchers in tropical medicine. The genesis of Oxford’s involvement goes back to a conversation over a bottle of whiskey, between David Weatherall and Peter Williams, the then Director of the Wellcome Trust, in New York in 1 ...
 
From Oxford University's Rothermere American Institute, host Professor Adam Smith talks to guests doing world-leading research that sheds light on the United States from the outside in. We ask what forces have shaped the culture and politics of the US, how its role in the world has changed and what it might be in the future. Is America now, or has it ever been, the "last best hope of earth"? Probably not, but plenty of people have thought so. We try to understand why.
 
The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography's SoundCloud channel introduces you to notable men and women who've shaped the British past, worldwide. The biographies cover all walks of British life - including literature, the arts, sport, politics, business, and science - and range from pre-history to the 21st century. The stories are selected from the 60,000 lives within the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. The Dictionary is the national record of people who've left their mark on Brit ...
 
The Oxford Food Governance Group is an interdisciplinary group of researchers from the Institute for Science, Innovation and Society (InSIS), Said Business School, and the Unit for Biocultural Variation and Obesity (UBVO) at the University of Oxford, who share an interest in food governance practices. Looking at the politics of food distribution, sustainability, and governance of the food supply among other topics, this series will look at how we get our food and why it matters.
 
The inaugural Oxford-India Day took place on 17 June 2011. The event aimed to celebrate the longstanding and varied links between the University and India, and to reinvigorate and strengthen those links. Over 80 external guests, representing Indian business, Indian government, UK government, Indian civil society, journalism, law and academia came to Oxford, exploring cutting-edge collaborative research; the students and staff who have come to Oxford from India; and the outstanding collection ...
 
Check in to Miami University's #1 radio show hosted by Evan Burnham and Joe Hayden and listen as the boys give you their hilarious take on life in the fantasy land of Oxford, Ohio. Updated with a new show every week! Check out the official Spotify playlist @Oxbox Radio.
 
Professor of Poetry Alice Oswald gives her lectures on poetry, language, literature, beauty and life every term. The Professor of Poetry lectures were conceived in 1708 by Berkshire landowner Henry Birkhead and began after he bequeathed some money so it could be a valuable supplement to the curriculum. He believed ‘the reading of the ancient poets gave keenness and polish to the minds of young men as well as to the advancement of more serious literature both sacred and human’. The first poet ...
 
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show series
 
In 1980, Jimmy Carter's administration leaned on the US Olympic Committee to boycott the Moscow Games. Today, there are calls for the US to once again boycott the Olympics -- this time in Beijing. What are the lessons of the 1980 boycott? Can sport ever be an effective instrument of foreign policy? And does the US any longer have the credibility as…
 
Jenny Lind, the "Swedish Nightingale": a soprano who made strong men weep with the beauty of her voice. In this episode, Adam explores the Nightingale's sensational tour of the US in 1850-52. She was described as the "most famous woman in the world" by her promoter, the never-knowingly-unselling impresario P T Barnum. Her reputation for virtue did …
 
For World Press Freedom Day we look at the pressures on independent journalism in two EU countries In this episode of our podcast we talk to two of our Journalist Fellows about the growing pressures facing journalists and independent news media in Poland and Hungary. We look at the threats of authoritarianism, the weaponisation of advertising reven…
 
In recent years, the United States and the European Union have taken more aggressive actions to check big tech firms through antitrust or competition law. Join us as we look into the key issues associated with the power that big tech companies hold and how antitrust law can correct for some of these, as well as how some of these considerations may …
 
The latest edition of University Registrars Talking About Stuff sees me chatting to Lee Sanders, Registrar and Secretary at the University of Birmingham Lee talks about his all-encompassing role across professional services at Birmingham as well as in relation to governance and as a member of the university executive. Drawing on experiences from bo…
 
TORCH Goes Digital! presents a series of weekly live events Big Tent - Live Events! Part of the Humanities Cultural Programme, one of the founding stones for the future Stephen A. Schwarzman Centre for the Humanities. Oliver Ready (St Antony’s College) and Sasha Dugdale (Writer in Residence, St John’s College, Cambridge), two leading translators fr…
 
Held on International Women's Day 2021, Part of the Humanities Cultural Programme, one of the founding stones for the future, Stephen A. Schwarzman Centre for the Humanities - in collaboration with Lincoln College, Oxford. Talk and Performance from Dr Samantha Ege, Lincoln College Oxford.In celebration of International Women’s Day (8 March 2021), D…
 
Professor Emily C. Burns, Terra Foundation Visiting Professor in American Art, gives the first in the series of The Terra Lectures in American Art: Performing Innocence: US Artists in Paris, 1865-1914. Between the end of the US Civil War and the start of World War I, thousands of American artists studied and worked in Paris. While popular thought h…
 
Professor Emily C. Burns, Terra Foundation Visiting Professor in American Art, gives the third in the series of The Terra Lectures in American Art: Performing Innocence: US Artists in Paris, 1865-1914. Performing Innocence: Primitive / IncipientThe Terra Lectures in American Art: Performing Innocence: US Artists in Paris, 1865-1914Moderator: James …
 
Professor c, Terra Foundation Visiting Professor in American Art, gives the second lecture in the The Terra Lectures in American Art: Performing Innocence: US Artists in Paris, 1865-1914 series. Moderator: Wanda M.Corn, Robert and Ruth Halperin Professor Emerita in Art History, Stanford University Between the end of the US Civil War and the start o…
 
Professor Emily C. Burns, Terra Foundation Visiting Professor in American Art, gives the fourth in the series of The Terra Lectures in American Art: Performing Innocence: US Artists in Paris, 1865-1914. Content Warning: This talk will include references to historic racist language and imagery. Viewer discretion is advised.Performing Innocence: Baby…
 
TORCH Book at Lunchtime webinar on Charles Dickens and the Properties of Fiction: The Lodger World by Dr Ushashi Dasgupta. Book at Lunchtime is a series of bite-sized book discussions held weekly during term-time, with commentators from a range of disciplines. The events are free to attend and open to all.When Dickens was nineteen years old, he wro…
 
As COVID-19 continues to rage and ravage our communities, the gains made in the past decades towards gender equality are at risk of being reversed. How have women been hit by this pandemic? Which groups of women are most vulnerable? And what are gender-sensitive policies for COVID-19 response and recovery? To look at the impact of the pandemic on w…
 
The latest edition of University Registrars Talking About Stuff offers the opportunity to hear from Douglas Blackstock, Chief Executive of the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education. We learn all about the work of the QAA and how it has shrunk significantly in size in recent years but remains an organisation with global reach and one which i…
 
In this episode we speak to to three women journalists from Kyrgyzstan, India and Indonesia discuss female representation in the news media, why they got into journalism, and how to ensure women’s voices and interests are heard. In this episode of our Future of Journalism podcast we speak to to three women journalists from Kyrgyzstan, India and Ind…
 
On the morning of February 1st, Myanmar's military imprisoned prominent political figures and imposed a yearlong state of emergency, alleging fraud in the November election. Protesters have since taken to the streets in what has been Myanmar’s largest civil disobedience movement in over a decade. So what led to this coup? What are these protesters …
 
TORCH Book at Lunchtime event on Sophocles: Antigone and other tragedies by Professor Oliver Taplin. With panellists Professor Karen Leeder and Dr Lucy Jackson. Book at Lunchtime is a series of bite-sized book discussions held during term-time, with commentators from a range of disciplines. The events are free to attend and open to all.Sophocles st…
 
At around 11am on Thursday 18 February 1943 two students in Munich were arrested for distributing anti-Nazi pamphlets. By Monday they had been interrogated, tried, and executed along with another member of the resistance circle. Further arrests followed. From 15-27 February 2021 the White Rose Project will be following the events as they happened i…
 
It's fifty years since the publication of From the Life and Songs of the Crow (by Ted Hughes). This is a lecture about lines and other sound barriers and how Crow flies straight through them. Alice Oswald is the current Professor of Poetry at the Faculty of English. She took up her post in September 2019. Alice Oswald’s first two lectures as Profes…
 
Episode 25 (a bit of a landmark) features our first international guest on University Registrars Talking About Stuff. Esa Hämäläinen is Director of Administration at the University of Helsinki and also Chair of a notable European higher ed association, HUMANE, the Heads of University Management & Administration Network in Europe. We learn about Esa…
 
In this episode of our 'Future of Journalism' podcast, we look at the values that drive a thriving membership model at an Argentinean news site We talk to one of Latin America's most senior journalists Chani Guyot whose news website RED/ACCIÓN runs a successful membership model that goes beyond being a revenue stream. We look at how the news outlet…
 
In this episode of University Registrars Talking About Stuff it is my enormous pleasure to be talking to Sheena Stewart who is University Secretary at Abertay University in Dundee. Sheena has worked at Abertay for an extraordinary 30 year period but, given what we have been through lately, we mainly look back at the past 12 months and then into the…
 
After rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol on January 6th, 2021, several social media companies took an unprecedented action — banning then-president Donald Trump from their platforms. This decision has spurred much conversation on whether and when limitations to online speech are justified. Increasingly, social media giants have come under fire for no…
 
TORCH Goes Digital! presents Big Tent - Live Events! Part of the Humanities Cultural Programme, one of the founding stones for the future Stephen A. Schwarzman Centre for the Humanities. In this joint event between St Peter's College and TORCH, distinguished and multi-award-winning British filmmaker, social campaigner and St Peter’s College alumnus…
 
Throughout the Victorian period, Black abolitionists toured the British Isles. In an effort to enlist British support for ending slavery in America--and later to enlist support for black rights--African Americans spoke not just in London or Leeds but in small towns and villages from the north of Scotland to the foot of Snowdonia and beyond. In this…
 
Internationally-renowned composer Anne Boyd is in conversation with composer Thomas Metcalf, discussing her life and music ahead of a performance of her String Quartet No. 2 ’Play on the Water’ later this year. This is part of the TORCH project ‘Pixelating the River’: Engagement with Contemporary Music through Graphical Inputs, played by the Kreutz…
 
After their own successful secession from the British Empire in the War of Independence, Americans cheered on other plucky nations attempting to wrest themselves from the yoke of others. Whether in Latin America, Hungary, Poland, Ireland or Italy, Americans mostly thought that national self-determination was a good thing. So naturally, when they cr…
 
TORCH Book at Lunchtime webinar on The Political Life of an Epidemic – Cholera, Crisis and Citizenship in Zimbabwe written by Professor Simukai Chigudu. About the book:Zimbabwe's catastrophic cholera outbreak of 2008–9 saw an unprecedented number of people affected, with 100,000 cases and nearly 5,000 deaths. Cholera, however, was much more than a …
 
On January 20th, the world watched the change of leadership in the White House as President Joe Biden took office and quickly re-joined the Paris Agreement. Was this a political action or one which will result in meaningful policy changes in the U.S. and elsewhere? Will Biden be able to effectively act on climate change? And who will pay for climat…
 
TORCH Book at Lunchtime webinar on Royals and Rebels: The Rise and Fall of the Sikh Empire, written by Dr Priya Atwal. Book at Lunchtime is a series of bite-sized book discussions held weekly during term-time, with commentators from a range of disciplines. The events are free to attend and open to all.In late-eighteenth-century India, the glory of …
 
In this episode Adam talks to Eric Foner, the pre-eminent historian of the Civil War and Reconstruction, about the resonances of the Reconstruction era in the present day. In the aftermath of the Civil War, the US had to deal with a recalcitrant white population in the South who rejected the legitimacy of the Federal government's attempt to give po…
 
Adam talks to Mitch Robertson and Kate Guy about Joe Biden's inaugural address and the prospects for his administration. Is this a “new page in America’s story” as Joe Biden says? Adam and guests discuss the new president's appeal to his understanding of the "American tradition" and whether it will work.…
 
When Trump supporters invaded the US Capitol on Jan 6, 2020, in an attempt to prevent the ratification of the election of Joe Biden, the immediate response of many in the American media was that it was "not who we are". But in this episode, Adam talks to Bruce Baker from the University of Newcastle and Grace Mallon from Oxford, who explain that in …
 
In this episode of our podcast we delve into our survey of 234 digital leaders in 43 countries to look at the major trends that will influence journalism in the year ahead. In this episode of our podcast we delve into our survey of 234 digital leaders in 43 countries to look at the major trends that will influence journalism in the year ahead. We l…
 
COVID-19 has led to two million deaths worldwide. With distribution of the highly anticipated vaccines underway, ethical questions about who should receive the vaccine first are of great significance. How should governments prioritise healthcare workers, seniors, people with pre-existing conditions, and racial minorities, who have been disproportio…
 
Welcome to Season 3 of Oxford Policy Pod based out of the University of Oxford’s Blavatnik School of Government. In Season 3, join our host Sruthi Palaniappan as she speaks with leading experts in public policy and unpacks some of the most pressing policy challenges we face today.Students at the Blavatnik School of Government, Oxford University による
 
Following the suspension or barring of Donald Trump by many of the largest social media and tech platforms, after his supporters stormed the Capitol building in January 2021, we explore the issues surrounding these decisions. Following the suspension or barring of Donald Trump by many of the largest social media and tech platforms, after his suppor…
 
Why did the framers of the American constitution invest the President with so many of the powers and trapping of a king? Why does he have the power to pardon felons (including his friends), to command the army and to veto legislation? More to the point why did the framers end up creating a Presidency that although elected nevertheless wields more p…
 
On December 6, 2020, President Nicolás Maduro consolidated his grip on power after claiming victory in Venezuela’s parliamentary election — an election that was denounced by electoral observers and boycotted by opposition parties. The question now is who has political legitimacy? The Maduro regime or the opposition? In the last episode of season 2,…
 
Peerce McManus, Merin Joseph and Roy Sefa-Attakora, alumni of the Blavatnik School of Government, Oxford join Suta Kavari to discuss what the most appropriate policy responses to crime and social disorder should be. They dive deep into the questions around whether the criminal justice system, and in particular prisons, are a failure of imagination …
 
In this final Future of Journalism podcast of the year, members of our senior leadership team reflect on this momentous year for journalism and what we can perhaps look forward to next year 2020 has been a year like no other. World-changing events including the COVID-19 pandemic, the movement for racial justice, a fractious U.S. presidential electi…
 
Journalists from some of Scandinavia's leading news publishers discuss their organisations' premium news strategies, the value of lifestyle news and the false dichotomy of hard/soft news, and the role of gender. Journalists from some of Scandinavia's leading news publishers discuss their organisations' premium news strategies, the value of lifestyl…
 
Two authors of the first report from our Trust in News Project discuss how partisanship, transparency and other factors may contribute to trust in news, and what outstanding questions need exploring. Two authors of the first report from our Trust in News Project discuss how partisanship, transparency and other factors may contribute to trust in new…
 
TORCH Goes Digital! presents a series of weekly live events Big Tent - Live Events! Part of the Humanities Cultural Programme, one of the founding stones for the future Stephen A. Schwarzman Centre for the Humanities. In collaboration with the Voltaire Foundation, TORCH is delighted to support the Annual Besterman Lecture, 2020Lecture by Professor …
 
In a chat with Rasmus Nielsen, Alan Rusbridger, former Editor-in-Chief of the Guardian, argues journalists should be more transparent and rethink their relationship with their audience Our host is Rasmus Nielsen, Director of the Reuters Institute. Our guest is Alan Rusbridger, former Editor-in-Chief of The Guardian and Principal of Lady Margaret Ha…
 
Author of a new report into the trends around news podcasts during the COVID-19 pandemic Nic Newman discusses his findings. How successful are these podcasts? What different formats exist? What do news outlets need to consider? Host: Federica Cherubini is Head of Leadership Development at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. She is an…
 
In the latest edition of University Registrars Talking About Stuff, Episode 23 in the series, I’m in conversation with Andrew Young, Chief Operating Officer at the London School of Economics. We talk about Andrew’s career history - from Newcastle to the capital - and the joys and challenges of working in an institution with such a distinctive histo…
 
Episode 22 of University Registrars Talking About Stuff finds me in discussion with Gill Aitken, Registrar at the University of Oxford. Gill talks through her career from private sector legal firm to civil service lawyer in the Department of Health, also leading various professional teams, and now her first couple of years at Oxford where she has r…
 
This event is supported by TORCH as part of the Humanities Cultural Programme, one of the founding stones of the future Stephen A. Schwarzman Centre for the Humanities. Supported by TORCH through the Humanities Cultural Programme. Join us for an online in-conversation with Prof Geoffrey Batchen and Dr Lena Fritsch, discussing the work of pioneering…
 
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