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Interested in astronomy, but don't know what you would do with an astronomy degree? Interested in majoring in science, but don't know if you want to be a doctor? We're here for you! STEMelanated pathways interviews Black, Brown, and Indigenous folks in STEM careers, STEM education, and STEM hobbies. STEMelanated pathways will also explore the history of STEM in these communities and cultures. STEM is and has always been for everyone.STEM pathways and destinations vary. Don't let anyone convi ...
 
What does mathematics have to do with nature or art? The video tracks in this album trace the origin of the mathematics of chaos and describe how the chance discovery of fractals became the basis for some real - and revolutionary - commercial applications such as the fax and the modem. A closer look at ancient fabric designs and the spiral of a nautilus shell also reveals repeating patterns that can be analysed in a mathematical way. This material forms part of The Open University course MS2 ...
 
The STEMCAST is a semi-monthly podcast released on Mondays. It is hosted by us, Jess and Elisabeth. We talk about anything, and everything, affecting us on our journey through engineering! We also offer terrible advice to students, scientists, researchers, (etc.) and pretty much anyone that asks about school.
 
M-theory is an 11-dimensional quantum theory of gravity which, in addition to gravitons and other particle-like excitations, includes extended objects known as membranes and five- branes. Though a complete definition of M-theory is not yet known, it is proposed as a nonperturbative formulation of superstring theory and as such is a compelling candidate for a unified theory of the fundamental particles and forces in Nature. Much has been learned about M-theory through its symmetries and its r ...
 
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Today's episode is the journey of Dr. Tamera Hughes PharmD/PhD. We discuss community pharmacy v. retail pharmacy, transitions happening towards value-based care in community pharmacy to integrate pharmacists beyond the counter, pursuing a dual degree, and her work on improving care in communities of color. Music courtesy of https://www.purple-plane…
 
Games have been of interest to mathematicians almost since mathematics became a subject. In fact, entire branches of mathematics have arisen simply to analyze certain games. The Raven's Hat: Fallen Pictures, Rising Sequences, and Other Mathematical Games (MIT Press, 2021) does something very different, and something that I think listeners will find…
 
From its more mainstream, business-focused and business-friendly “Lean In” variants, to more radical, critical and intersectional understandings of feminism, the past decade has seen a flourishing of discussion from those proposing and critiquing different schools of thought for the way we think about gender in society. Dr. Eugenia Cheng’s addition…
 
In this episode, we discuss the career every 90s kid dreamed of after watching Free Willy, marine science! Leslie Townsell and I discuss marine science, climate change, the costs of applying to grad school, the importance of mentors, and more. Leslie is a very proud Spelman graduate whose story shows us your path in STEM can have many twists and tu…
 
In this episode, we discuss getting a Ph.D. in math, what you can do with a degree in math (hint: it's so much), and Dr. Woods shows us that a setback isn't the end if you don't want it to be. Music: https://www.purple-planet.com Profile of Dr. Woods: https://mathematicallygiftedandblack.com/honorees/zerotti-woods/ Dr. Woods Instagram: Zerotti Wood…
 
Episode56-Elham Kazemi and Tracy Zager, "Harnessing Collective Will: Learning Together but not in the Usual Ways."NCSM Leadership in Mathematics Education による
 
The use of diagrams in geometry raise questions about the place of the physical, the sensory, the human in mathematical reasoning. Multiple sources of evidence speak to how these dilemmas were tackled in antiquity: the linguistics of diagram construction, the state of drawings in the oldest extant manuscripts, commentaries of philosophers, and impl…
 
In this episode, Dr. Mitchell and I discuss her journey to becoming a retail pharmacist, some of the challenges she's faced along the way, and her advice to potential pharmacists. We also discuss Dr. Mitchell's hobby as a fiber artist and our mutual hobby of participating in races. Music: https://www.purple-planet.com You can find Aftan's fabric ar…
 
One of the questions I am often asked is exactly what do mathematicians do. The short answer is that they look at different mathematical structures, try to deduce their properties, and think about how they might apply to the real world. Math Without Numbers (Dutton, 2020) does a wonderful job of explaining what mathematical structures are, and does…
 
Episode55-Emma Treviño, Carmen Whitman, and Harold Asturias, "Leadership: Paying Attention to What Matters; Student Thinking."NCSM Leadership in Mathematics Education による
 
In this episode, I (Jordan) discuss what STEMelanated is, who I am, and what you can expect from this podcast. You can find all things STEMelanated at linktr.ee/STEMelanatedJordan による
 
Jason Rosenhouse's Games for Your Mind: The History and Future of Logic Puzzles (Princeton UP, 2020) is about a panoply of logic puzzles. You’ll find Mastermind and sudoku discussed early on, and then you’ll be hit with an incredible array of some of the most intriguing logic puzzles that have ever been devised. Some will be familiar to you, but so…
 
Euclid spends a lot of time in the Elements constructing figures with his ubiquitous ruler and compass. Why did he think this was important? Why did he think this was better than a geometry that has only theorems and no constructions? In fact, constructions protect geometry from foundational problems to which it would otherwise be susceptible, such…
 
Episode54-Mike Flynn, "Bold Advocacy: Empowering Educators to Create System-Wide Support for Change in Mathematics Education"NCSM Leadership in Mathematics Education による
 
It would be simple enough to say that mathematics is being done, and that those who do it are mathematicians. Yet, the history and culture of the mathematical community immediately complicate these statements. In her book A New Year's Present from a Mathematician (CRC Press, 2020), Snezana Lawrence guides a tour of European mathematical history tha…
 
The etymology of the term “postulate” suggests that Euclid’s axioms were once questioned. Indeed, the drawing of lines and circles can be regarded as depending on motion, which is supposedly proved impossible by Zeno’s paradoxes. Although whether these postulates correspond to ruler and compass or not is debatable, especially since Euclid seems to …
 
Science and maths are full of smart tools for explaining the world around us. Those tools can feel far removed from the way the rest of us understand that world. Can we reconcile the two approaches? Oxford Mathematician Anna Seigal provides some answers. The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.…
 
Math has a complicated relationship with the counterintuitive: Rigorous logic, calculation, and simulation can both help us wrap our minds around phenomena that defy our intuition, and thrust upon us whole new worlds of counterintuitive results. In his new book, Jim Stein introduces readers to several unexpected and sometimes astonishing examples, …
 
Mathematics as a subject is distinctive in its symbolic abstraction and its potential for logical and computational rigor. But mathematicians tend to impute other qualities to our subject that set it apart, such as impartiality, universality, and elegance. Far from incidental, these ideas prime mathematicians and the public to see in mathematics th…
 
Alfred S. Posamentier's The Joy of Geometry (Prometheus, 2020) is a book for someone who has taken geometry but wants to go further. This book, as one might expect, is heavy on diagrams and it is sometimes hard to discuss some of the ideas without reference to a diagram. Also, to be fair, this is not a book intended to be read casually. To fully ap…
 
Euclid’s definitions of point, line, and straightness allow a range of mathematical and philosophical interpretation. Historically, however, these definitions may not have been in the original text of the Elements at all. Regardless, the subtlety of defining fundamental concepts such as straightness is best seen by considering the geometry not only…
 
Mathematicians get up to all sorts. Geometers and Topologists in particular occupy a world of inconceivable shapes, concepts and dimensions. But how do you visualise such ideas? Sure, there's computer graphics, but what about over here, in the real world? In this lecture Henry Segerman will show just how it can be done with a dazzling array of 3D p…
 
Mathematics has a lot going for it, but David Sumpter argues that it can not only provide you with endless YouTube recommendations, and even make you rich, but it can make you a better person. Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX MarketsDavid Sumpter による
 
You have to sympathise with statistics. Misunderstood and misused when all they want to do is accumulate. What they need is a little human understanding. Tim Harford's Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture does just that. No slides, no notes, just Tim telling us how to be on our guard. The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by …
 
Oxford Mathematician Josh Bull won the 2019-2020 Premier League Fantasy Football competition from nearly 8 million entrants. So how did he do it? Did he by any chance use mathematics? In this lecture Josh shows just how useful maths can be, not just in dealing with serious issues, but in dealing with the things that we do and enjoy in our everyday …
 
How should axioms be justified? By appeal to intuition, or sensory perception? Or are axioms legitimated merely indirectly, by their logical consequences? Plato and Aristotle disagreed, and later Newton disagreed even more. Their philosophies can be seen as rival interpretations of Euclid’s Elements. Transcript What kinds of axioms do we want in ou…
 
Doing mathematics can be stimulating, deep, and sometimes fantastic. It can also be frustrating, impenetrable, and at times dispiriting. In her new collection of essays, writer and mathematician Susan D'Agostino shows how math itself can be a useful guide through these experiences. How to Free Your Inner Mathematician: Notes on Mathematics and Life…
 
The book being discussed is Mathematics Entertainment for the Millions (World Scientific Publishing Co.), by Alfred Posamentier. In reading this book, it occurred to me that it might equally well have been entitled Millions of Mathematical Entertainments. There may not be millions of entertainments, but there’s an incredible amount – most of it eas…
 
Euclid’s Elements, read backwards, reduces complex truths to simpler ones, such as the Pythagorean Theorem to the parallelogram area theorem, and that in turn to triangle congruence. How far can this reductive process be taken, and what should be its ultimate goals? Some have advocated that the axiomatic-deductive program in mathematics is best see…
 
There is no shortage of books on the growing impact of data collection and analysis on our societies, our cultures, and our everyday lives. David Hand's new book Dark Data: Why What You Don't Know Matters (Princeton University Press, 2020) is unique in this genre for its focus on those data that aren't collected or don't get analyzed. More than an …
 
Calculus Reordered: A History of the Big Ideas (Princeton UP, 2019) takes readers on a remarkable journey through hundreds of years to tell the story of how calculus evolved into the subject we know today. David Bressoud explains why calculus is credited to seventeenth-century figures Isaac Newton and Gottfried Leibniz, and how its current structur…
 
There are very few math books that merit the adjective ‘charming’ but Mage Merlin's Unsolved Mathematical Mysteries (MIT Press, 2020) is one of them. Satyan Devadoss and Matt Harvey have chosen a truly unique, creative and charming way to acquaint readers with some of the unsolved problems of mathematics. Some are classic, such as the Goldbach Conj…
 
The Pythagorean Theorem might have been used in antiquity to build the pyramids, dig tunnels through mountains, and predict eclipse durations, it has been said. But maybe the main interest in the theorem was always more theoretical. Euclid’s proof of the Pythagorean Theorem is perhaps best thought of not as establishing the truth of the theorem but…
 
The branch of mathematics called game theory – the Prisoners Dilemma is a particularly well-known example of a game – is used by philosophers, social scientists, and others to explore many types of social relations between humans and between nonhuman creatures. In Games in the Philosophy of Biology (Cambridge University Press, 2020), Cailin O’Conno…
 
Category theory is well-known for abstraction—concepts and tools from diverse fields being recognized as specific cases of more foundational structures—though the field has always been driven and shaped by the needs of applications. Moreover, category theory is rarely introduced even to undergraduate math majors, despite its unifying role in theory…
 
For decades, statisticians, social scientists, psychologists, and economists (among them Nobel Prize winners) have spent massive amounts of precious time thinking about whether streaks actually exist. After all, a substantial number of decisions that we make in our everyday lives are quietly rooted in this one question: If something happened before…
 
Greek geometry is written in a style adapted to oral teaching. Mathematicians memorised theorems the way bards memorised poems. Several oddities about how Euclid’s Elements is written can be explained this way. Transcript Greek geometry is oral geometry. Mathematicians memorised theorems the way bards memorised poems. Euclid’s Elements was almost l…
 
The Grey Squirrel invasion explaining tumour cell proliferation? Alan Turing explaining football shirt patterns? The close relationship between slugs and the human heart? What is the common link? Mathematics of course. And Philip Maini. Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.…
 
Brian Greene is a Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Columbia University in the City of New York, where he is the Director of the Institute for Strings, Cosmology, and Astroparticle Physics, and co-founder and chair of the World Science Festival. He is well known for his TV mini-series about string theory and the nature of reality, including t…
 
Introductory courses in discrete mathematics cover a variety of distinctive but interconnected topics, from the underpinnings of logic and set theory through overviews of combinatorics and graph theory, which lend themselves to equally diverse presentation styles. In Discrete Mathematics with Ducks (Second Edition; CRC Press, 2018), dr. sarah-marie…
 
In this, the second online lecture we are making widely available, Ben Green introduces and delivers a short lecture on Primitive Roots, part of the Number Theory Lecture course for Second Year Undergraduates. We are making these lectures available (there are many more on this YouTube Channel via the Playlist) to give an insight in to the student e…
 
Oxford has gone online for lockdown. So how do our student lectures look? Let Marc Lackenby show you as he looks at paths between vertices in a graph with a view to finding the shortest route between any two vertices. Works for your Satnav for example. We are making these lectures available (there are many more on this YouTube Channel via the Playl…
 
Proof-oriented geometry began with Thales. The theorems attributed to him encapsulate two modes of doing mathematics, suggesting that the idea of proof could have come from either of two sources: attention to patterns and relations that emerge from explorative construction and play, or the realisation that “obvious” things can be demonstrated using…
 
Slavery and the University: Histories and Legacies (University of Georgia Press, 2019), edited by Leslie M. Harris, James T. Campbell, and Alfred L. Brophy, is the first edited collection of scholarly essays devoted solely to the histories and legacies of this subject on North American campuses and in their Atlantic contexts. Gathering together con…
 
Alex Berke's Beautiful Symmetry (MIT Press, 2020) is both a fascinating book and a concept -- it's like no other book I’ve ever read. It's a coloring book about math, inviting us to engage with mathematical concepts visually through coloring challenges and visual puzzles. We can explore symmetry and the beauty of mathematics playfully, coloring thr…
 
Models. They are dominating our Lockdown lives. But what is a mathematical model? We hear a lot about the end result, but how is it put together? What are the assumptions? And how accurate can they be? In our first online only lecture Robin Thompson, Research Fellow in Mathematical Epidemiology in Oxford, will explain. Robin is working on the ongoi…
 
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