Literary Discussion 公開
[search 0]
もっと

Download the App!

show episodes
 
A monthly conversation about books and ideas on NTS Radio hosted by friends Carrie Plitt, a literary agent, and Octavia Bright, a writer and academic. Each show features an author interview, book recommendations, lively discussion and a little music too, all built around a related theme - anything from the novella to race to masculinity. Listen live on NTS Radio www.nts.live
 
A 1-hour, conversational podcast for artists that aims to provide different viewpoints to different issues relevant to the contemporary creative’s career development by simply asking: should I or shouldn’t I? Artists of the Houston community from all walks of life and practices provide their insight, experiences, and expertise through a series of questions, both organic and pre-set, that will ultimately answer this main question. The guest artists are curated to provide alternate viewpoints ...
 
Ultimate Concerns features interviews and discussions with religion experts about their research. Insights from these discussions are applied to contemporary cultural and political questions. Topics are related to many different religions (such as Christianity, Islam, and Buddhism) and methods of study (such as literary studies, history, theology, and philosophy). Ron Mourad, professor of religious studies at Albion College, hosts the show.
 
Sol Searching blog talk radio feature lively discussions on the hot topic matters in the area of business, literary, relationships, politics basically any and everything. These discussions will leave the listeners searching their sol (soul). The conversations will be thought provoking, educational/informative, and the discussions will continue way pass the end of the radio show because the listeners will resume the discussion with their friends and family at work and home. www.facebook.com/s ...
 
Contrary to the (thankfully) diminishing belief that science fiction is a predominantly male genre, women have been at the forefront of sci-fi and speculative fiction since before it became a popularized literary category. Sisters of Sci-Fi is a bi-monthly podcast that examines the immense amount of science fiction written by women since the 1600s. In order to cover as many writers as possible, over this enormous expanse of time, rich with options, the show is formatted like a sort of book c ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
Does the written word really have the power to change things? How do you make a good argument in writing? Does the form of the essay lend itself particularly well to politics? Join us as we talk to the writer Otegha Uwagba about her brilliant essay Whites, a clear sighted, powerful comment on race in our society which examines her feelings in the w…
 
You see them packed into artist bios: residencies, grants, fellowships, awards, etc. What are they? What’s the difference? Are some better than others? A residency may grant you time to live rent-free to work on your art, but can you just up and leave your life like that? A grant can give you funds to complete a project, but how long does that last…
 
What with the news of a viable Covid vaccine in the works and a Biden Harris administration on the horizon, you may be having an unusual feeling, one that you vaguely recognise but can’t quite put your finger on... Well, friends, it might just be Optimism. We're a few weeks into lockdown two in the UK, and seeing as we talked about joy at the start…
 
Not every artist considers their practice a small business, but the government does. Many creatives use this fact to their advantage by using business structures to grow and/or fund their practice. An artist will find several benefits as an independant, for-profit small business, and a non-profit provides another model of funding & structure that’s…
 
What does it mean to love too much, or in a way that society doesn’t see as appropriate? Is loving an inherently complicated experience? Helping us consider these questions is our guest, the author Mary Gaitskill, who joined us to talk about her masterful long essay Lost Cat, which has just been published in the UK for the first time. It’s the stor…
 
Representation uniquely manifests in different creative fields: curators, agents, gallery owners, editors, producers, etc. With audiences, collectors, and revenue more accessible than ever with the internet, creatives’ reliance on representation for success has diminished. However, representation can still prove to be an important element in an art…
 
According to a study by M-AAA, artists are one of the most educated populations amongst working sectors. However, degrees and/or institutional support has never been, nor should be, the deciding factor on whether or not someone is a legitimate/good/worthy artist. MFAs, ideally, should be programs that help an artist improve their craft, but others …
 
Each city is its own ecosystem of artists, organizations, and revenue with particular notions of identity and value. For example, Austin is known as the music capital of Texas, but Houston boasts one of the largest & most diverse populations in the United States. Should a Houston musician move to Austin to capitalize on that reputation? Should any …
 
What is it about sisters? Loving, competitive, sometimes incredibly sinister... this month, we're thinking about sisterhood, and all those memorable sisters that fill the pages of literature with their rivalries and alliances, adoration and rebellion. From Little Women to My Sister the Serial Killer, we're getting into why this familial bond is so …
 
The stereotype of the starving artist still pervades the social conscious, but creatives know it’s more complex than that: you work to feed yourself, family, and the art. The question becomes, “How much time can I dedicate to my craft and pay rent?” Artists have navigated this question in many ways but deciding to go full-time with their creative p…
 
We did it! Fresh Arts follows up its Summit and Discussion Series with the podcast series "Should I or Shouldn't I?" that will air October 15, 2020. Listen to this promo to hear Reyes Ramirez and Angela Carranza talk about their experiences with creating a new venture and how they've adjusted to online programming, as well as some behind the scenes…
 
Here at Literary Friction, we believe translation is both an art and a superpower; it gives us access to voices and stories from all over the world, and it's a rolling theme we keep coming back to on the show. What makes a good translation? Are translators finally starting to get the recognition they deserve? Why are there still so few translated t…
 
Before we were hit with this recent heatwave, there was starting to be a chill in the air, and soon it will be the perfect climate for taking brisk walks in parks, or just round the block for your government mandated hour of exercise should we find ourselves in another lockdown. Either way, the perfect conditions for… listening to books! The first …
 
Why is there so much delight in discovering a juicy new word? Do you ever read the dictionary for fun? Is it annoying when people use obscure words too often? This month’s show is dedicated to the building blocks of all books: words. Joining us is the author Eley Williams, whose first novel The Liar’s Dictionary is both about words and delights in …
 
We're still on our summer break, so we wanted to use this chance to bring you a re-run of one of our favourite shows from our archive. In 2018, we spoke to Thomas Page McBee about his book Amateur, which tells the true story of his quest to become the first trans man to box at Madison Square Garden in New York City. The theme of the show is Masculi…
 
Don't know about you, but we've really felt the need for a little more joy around here lately. We miss it, and as the world continues to turn upside down, we’re learning how to find it in new ways and in new places. So, Minisode Fifteen is dedicated to JOY, and the best thing about joy is that once you have a little of it you can find ways to pass …
 
What does it mean to write luxuriously? How can books be rich and generous? This month we’re talking about luxury in literature - and no, we don’t mean books about the 1% having spa days or flying first class. Instead, we’re talking about writing that explores the aesthetic, opulent, baroque and decadent. Through writers including Oscar Wilde, F. S…
 
This month, we're going behind closed doors with Carmen Maria Machado, who dialled in from the States to talk to us. Her innovative memoir, In The Dream House, is about her experience of domestic abuse, something that is so often hidden from view, and even more so when it happens in a queer relationship. What does it mean to write into archival sil…
 
L.A. Young generously does a guest-takeover-episode of the podcast to talk about race and oppression in Science Fiction. With her extensive knowledge, she gives suggestions and examples of works by Black Sci-Fi/Speculative Fiction authors that have used the genre to address the issues of racism and social justice within society. The biggest thank y…
 
We're in the midst of an international protest movement, sparked by the murder of George Floyd by a member of the Minneapolis police. As a result, it didn’t feel right to put out a new show, so instead we wanted to re-run a show from 2017 during which we talked about race with Reni Eddo-Lodge, the author of Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People…
 
We're still stuck on the theme of intimacy, because we haven't been able to stop thinking about it. The demands of this crisis are forcing us to rethink so much that used to be instinctive, including how we connect with other people - physical contact has never been more loaded, and we're having to rely on other ways to bridge the gaps between us. …
 
Like a lot of people, lockdown has made us think about intimacy. As separation from our loved ones drags on, we're all having to find different ways to connect, and in this socially distant reality, intimacy feels more necessary than ever - however we can get it (hot tip: books are good!). Writing and reading can be intimate acts, so for this episo…
 
In the absence of an outside world, and because we are missing our loved ones, our friends, our acquaintances, even strangers on trains, for Minisode Thirteen we're going inside our minds: we want to talk about the characters from literature that have stayed with us and taken root in our imaginations long after finishing the books that brought them…
 
How do you hold onto hope in the dark? This question feels more pertinent than ever right now, and we couldn't think of anyone we'd rather ask than author Jenny Offill, who we spoke to from our various quarantine locations this month. Her new novel Weather is a sharp, insightful meditation on how regular humans process catastrophe, and while it's p…
 
How are you finding reading at the moment? Are you struggling to drag your eyes away from Twitter or endlessly scrolling news sites? What does escapism really mean? What's working, and what isn't working in these anxious times? We are currently about sixty miles apart from one another, but very pleased to be bringing you Minisode Twelve from our is…
 
Has anyone written a great social media novel yet? Is Twitter destroying our ability to read novels in the first place? How worried should we be about bookstagrammers? Why are you listening to this podcast instead of reading a book? What even is the point of podcasting?? On this month’s show we’re asking these not at all panicked questions and talk…
 
However you feel about Brexit, there’s no denying that it’s going to change the relationship that people in the UK have with the European Union and the twenty-seven countries that make it up. But we are not here to dwell in the misery of all that! One of the most beautiful things about literature is that, unless things get fully fascistic, no polit…
 
This month on Literary Friction we’re going on the run. Or, more accurately, we’ll be sitting still in the studio talking about literature that features characters and people who are running away both physically and psychologically, from Cora in Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad, to Madame Bovary, to Augusten Burroughs and A.A. Gill. Our …
 
For the first minisode of 2020, we're wading into the gossipy world of TS Eliot's love life: this year marks the publication of his romantic letters to Emily Hale, fifty years after their deaths. If you missed the story in the press, let's just say it's not one in which he covered himself in glory. Listen in for our thoughts on literary fetishism, …
 
Our first show of the year (and decade) is all about New Beginnings: from Virginia Woolf's novels to memoirs like Amy Liptrot’s The Outrun, we’ll look at books that feature rejuvenation, and think about why it's such fertile ground for storytelling. Joining us is author An Yu, whose thoughtful and surreal debut novel Braised Pork inspired the theme…
 
For our last show of the year, we’re going into therapy - or, more accurately, we’ll be talking about therapy’s intersection with literature. Does analysis make good fiction? Do therapists make good characters, or good authors? What has the language of psychology given to literature? We’re very happy that the inspiration for today’s topic is our gu…
 
It’s our last minisode of 2019, so we're looking back over some of our favourite reads of the year, some of our resolutions for 2020, plus the usual cultural recommendations - so, if you need some inspiration for what books to buy people for Christmas then grab a pen! Also, here’s your annual reminder to support your local independent bookshop inst…
 
Dr. Monifa Phillips and I talk about her recent PhD research, and her current career as an electronics and engineering trainee patent attorney. You can find her on twitter at @monifa_monifa And her linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/monifa-physicist/ Here is the article about the Anywayup Cup: https://www.theguardian.com/money/2012/jun/08/a-work…
 
From William Faulkner to John Updike, and Hilary Mantel to Margaret Atwood, why do authors return to the same characters and places again and again? What can a trilogy do that a solo book can’t? And why do we get so excited (and nervous) about these returns? To help us answer these questions, this month we have a very special guest: the inimitable,…
 
This episode is filled with SPOILERS, since we give specifics throughout our discussion. Melissa Selzer and I both thoroughly enjoyed Devorah Major's short story, Trade Winds. The idea of home and being able to translate that idea to someone with a different context to the word really struck a chord with us. Here is a link to videos of her performi…
 
For Minisode Eight we were inspired by a question podcaster Isaac Butler asked on Twitter, which was: What’s a Great Book that you read because it was assigned to you that you actually loved? We also asked: Which were the books that really did it for you at school or university? Did you like being set reading, or rebel against it? And were there an…
 
This show is a little different from usual as we’re coming to you from the Cheltenham Literature Festival, where we were this year’s podcast in residence. This jam-packed special features recordings from both the events we chaired: ‘A Body of Work’ with Karen Havelin and Eleanor Thom, in which we discussed their books Please Read This Leaflet Caref…
 
I had the great honor and pleasure of talking with Dawn Sam Alden and Jen Albert about their experiences as both fight coordinators and acting in classic theatre, including their current production of a Klingon adaptation of Christopher Marlowe's Tamburlaine through the theatrical company, the School of Night. See the show-notes on our website for …
 
This episode is filled with SPOILERS, since we give specifics throughout our discussion. Quick amendment to this episode: Hera WAS mentioned in Rogue One and the Ghost is one of the rebel ships that shows up for the battle of Scarif. Kate Motzenbacker and I cover Claudia Gray's Star Wars: Bloodline. It most likely can be found at your local library…
 
This month's show is called City of Voices in honour of our very esteemed guest, author Zadie Smith. We met Zadie for a live event in Sheffield to talk about her first short story collection, Grand Union, a playful, ambitious symphony of different voices, styles and forms. Listen in to hear about why we should all embrace our inner chaos, the ways …
 
Do you consider yourself a vain person? Because this month is all about vanity in literature, dedicated to those characters who are just a little bit too pleased with themselves. It's also our first full show back this Autumn, and we are thrilled to kick things off with none other than the inimitable Deborah Levy, who joined us for a live event at …
 
Dr. Linh Anh Cat talks about her work on fungi, using her work in STEM to help inform public policy, her organization, Reclaiming STEM, and writing book reviews for the Book Riot Blog. Twitter: @LinhAnhCat https://linhanhcat.weebly.com/ Our next book will be Bloodline by Claudia Gray. It may be available at your local library, or it can be purchase…
 
Hello! We're back! We missed you! Welcome to Minisode Seven, in which we make an excited return to the studio and catch up on what we got up to over our summer break. Before all that, though, we want to play you some of an ace live event Octavia did with authors Jia Tolentino and Emilie Pine, discussing their brilliant essay collections, Trick Mirr…
 
Melissa Selzer and I talked about We and Our Own by one of histories most incredible women, Magdalena Mouján Otaño. The poem, of the same name, written by her grandfather, that inspired this short story is here: Zer da Euskera, nor da euskaldunak, Zeiñ, will Nongotarrak say? Galdezka daude atzerritarrak Ontara Begira, mundu gustyan bere berdiñik Ez…
 
Part two of a crossover with the Amphibian Press Podcast, V.S. Holmes talks about her experiences as a writer, publisher, and archaeologist in the private sector. Part one can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7CRdtAH5oxw&feature=youtu.be Website: www.vsholmes.com Publishing site: www.amphibianpressbooks.com Box set pre-order/order: bo…
 
Neha Bawa joins me to talk about "Panopte's Eye" by Tamai Kobayashi. A copy of the story is in So Long Been Dreaming: Post-Colonial Science Fiction and Fantasy. It is more than likely available at your local library, as well as on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/So-Long-Been-Dreaming-Postcolonial/dp/155152158X/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=So+Long+Been+Dreami…
 
Loading …

クイックリファレンスガイド

Google login Twitter login Classic login