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Exploring inequality, abuse and oppression around the world, we hear from those directly involved in an issue, examine the structural context to find why rights abuse exists, and look for possible solutions. You can also read articles related to some of these episodes at the web site of The Upstream Journal! www.upstreamjournal.org. We are pleased to see that Human Rights Magazine is a top-rated human rights podcast at Feedspot. (https://blog.feedspot.com/human_rights_podcasts/)
 
RightsUp explores the big human rights issues of the day through interviews with experts, academics, practicing lawyers, activists and policy makers who are at the forefront of tackling the world's most difficult human rights questions. RightsUp is brought to you by the Oxford Human Rights Hub, based in the Law Faculty at the University of Oxford. Music for this podcast is by Rosemary Allmann. (This podcast is distributed under a CC by NC-SA 4.0 license.)
 
Human rights are basic rights and freedoms that belong to every one of us, no matter who we are or where we live. These rights are universal, indivisible, and interdependent. Because they apply to everyone, everywhere, and at all times.Our aim in Human Rights Sentinel is to highlight the issues that are not covered by the media or have been neglected by the international committee due to political, national, or international interests.
 
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Human Rights - Audio

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Human Rights - Audio

Center for Strategic and International Studies

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CSIS human rights research is led by the Human Rights Initiative (HRI). Launched in 2014, HRI promotes a proactive global human rights agenda that reinforces democratic values as a central component of a comprehensive foreign policy. It seeks to generate innovative solutions for government, civil society, and the private sector and works to integrate human rights priorities across U.S. foreign policy interests. In conjunction with the HRI program, CSIS experts from across programs also exami ...
 
A show about human rights coming to you every week from the Cambridge Centre of Governance and Human Rights. Tune in each week as our panel explores the impact of new technologies on human rights, joined by fascinating guests from the University of Cambridge and around the world. (All rights reserved, so to speak. Our theme song, "Relative Dimensions", was created by the artificial intelligence at JukeDeck.)
 
Hosted by Lantos Foundation President, Dr. Katrina Lantos Swett, The Keeper features in depth conversations about the most pressing matters of human rights and justice around the world and welcomes some of the most important human rights figures of our time as guests.The Keeper takes its name from the personal conviction of the Lantos Foundation's namesake Congressman Tom Lantos, fully lived out in his own life, that we have a moral and ethical obligation to be our brother and sister’s keepe ...
 
What is the human rights issue? Where is this human right issue occurring? Which human right article in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights does it violate? How does it violate this right? Is anything already being done to help correct this human rights issue? What? Why should your peers care about this human rights issue? What can you/your peers do to about this?
 
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was ratified in 1948 by the United Nations General Assembly. It defines the fundamental rights of individuals, and exhorts all governments to protect these rights. The UN has translated the document into over three hundred languages and dialects. This audiobook includes readings in 21 languages.
 
The battle for democracy will be fought one human rights issue at a time. In this biweekly podcast from the CSIS Human Rights Initiative, host Marti Flacks tackles current events with activists and policymakers at the center of global efforts to promote human rights and build stronger, more sustainable democracies. Share your feedback at humanrights@csis.org.
 
Podcasts produced by the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission. The Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission was established under statute on 1 November 2014 to protect and promote human rights and equality in Ireland, to promote a culture of respect for human rights, equality and intercultural understanding, to promote understanding and awareness of the importance of human rights and equality, and to work towards the elimination of human rights abuses and discrimination.
 
The International Code of Conduct for Private Security Service Providers' Association (ICoCA) is a multistakeholder initiative whose mission is to raise private industry security standards and promote the responsible provision of private security. During these podcasts ICoCA invites different perspectives on what the future holds for responsible private security that respects human rights and international humanitarian law. Music by www.bensound.com
 
Welcome to The Human Rights Podcast from the Irish Centre for Human Rights at the National University of Ireland, Galway. Here at the Centre, we are fortunate to be visited each year by an array of world-leading practitioners, researchers and policy-makers in the field of human rights and its associated disciplines. We also have a vibrant community at the ICHR and more broadly in NUI Galway of academic staff, postdoctoral and doctoral scholars, and postgraduate and undergraduate students foc ...
 
TIC TALKS is all about sport, inclusion and human rights. TIC (The Inclusion Club) interviews leading world practitioners in the field of sport and recreation, with a focus on the inclusion of people with disability in sport and active recreation programs. Learn about new programs, new ways of thinking and new approaches to inclusion issues. We also look at the similarities of inclusion across targeted populations, including Indigenous people, people from different cultural backgrounds and w ...
 
At the University of Chicago, research and teaching in human rights integrate exploration of the core questions of human dignity with critical examination of the institutions designed to promote and protect human rights in the contemporary world. The University of Chicago Human Rights Program is an initiative unique among its peers for the interdisciplinary focus its faculty and students bring to bear on these essential matters. The Distinguished Lecturer series creates space for dialogue be ...
 
Human Rights in Transit is a collaborative project that engages the ongoing and emerging tensions that are at the center of contemporary global existence. As people struggle for their lives as migrants, refugees, citizens, and indeed as humans, there is also a radical de-centering and even crisis of the human underway. From technology, bioscience, and environmental transformations, to deconolonial critiques of humanism, the category of the human and the future of the humanities, is deeply un ...
 
This two-day conference provided a forum for academics, practitioners and government representatives to evaluate the current debate and future shape of the post-2015 agenda from a human rights perspective. It was focused on both theoretical and practical aspects of integrating human rights in the post-2105 agenda, with a particular focus on poverty, environment and peace and security.
 
This rousing collection of videos portray the vibrant global movement of movements devoted to environmental health, justice, dignity, diversity, and democracy – to human rights and the rights of nature. It opposes the concentration of wealth and distribution of poverty. It augurs an ecologically literate, just civilization where taking care of nature means taking care of people – and taking care of people means taking care of nature. Since 1990, Bioneers has acted as a fertile hub of social ...
 
What are the differences between individual and minority rights? How did the League of Nations and United Nations attempt to address the topic of human rights? Right now, we define human rights as the rights to which all people are inherently entitled to as a result of being a human being. From the creation of the League of Nations in 1920 it’s been accepted that everyone should be protected under a set of natural or legal laws, but how has the definition of these rights changed since they w ...
 
The Palimpsest of Human Rights is an experimental spoken word production which combines verse interpretations of the prose writings of Martin Luther King, Mohandas Gandhi, and Henry Thoreau. The influence of new, temporally-bound ideas on succeeding generations is revealed in a continuous discourse. The physical idea of a palimpsest (writing over the top of an existing text in a manuscript) is here extended to an aural experience. When the texts are read aloud, one over the top of another, t ...
 
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show series
 
Human Rights and Justice host Nkechi Taifa chats with Obi Egbuna, Jr. about the republishing of the iconic book of his father, "Destroy this Temple,” first published in 1971. The senior Egbuna was a Nigerian-born novelist, playwright and political activist known for being a member of the British Black Panther movement (1968-72) during the years he …
 
In the midst of the Second World War, Central and East European governments-in-exile struggled to make their voices heard as they reported back to the Allies and sought to reach mass Allied publics with eyewitness testimony of German atrocities committed in their respective homelands. The most striking case is that of Poland, whose wartime exile go…
 
In this week's episode, we talk to Ruth Rubio, Professor in the School of Transnational Governance at the European University Institute, about her book, Global Gender Constitutionalism and Women’s Citizenship: A Struggle for Transformative Inclusion, published by Cambridge University Press (ISBN: 9781316630303). Transcript available on the Oxford H…
 
The cost of tea for consumers is really low, given the volume of tea that is grown, half of it produced in China by some 80 million people. But it is workers in places like South Asia that have significant problems, where there is a long history of worker exploitation dating to colonial times. Tea workers throughout South Asia suffer from widesprea…
 
Human Rights and Justice talk show host Nkechi Taifa interviews Brother Tag and Sister Aleta from the Spirit of Mandela's "About the People," a grassroots project, about its premiere audio-visual broadcast installment #1: Camp Muntaqim, which will feature Revolutionary Elder Jalil Muntaqim and Incarcerated Organizer Kwame Shakur, as well as the pro…
 
Talk Show Host Nkechi Taifa shares her Reparations Roundup News and Views recording of her Feb. 2022 testimony before the California Reparations Task Force, on Episode 18 of Human Rights and Justice. The title of her testimony is History and Reflections of the Reparations Movement in the U.S.Nkechi による
 
Human Rights and Justice host Nkechi Taifa discusses her new book on reparations, "Reparations on Fire: How and Why its Spreading Across America," with cultural anthropologist Jessica Ann Mitchell Aiwuyor, director of the National Black Cultural Information Trust, 12-28-22.Nkechi による
 
It is commonly thought that, thanks to globalization, nation-state borders are becoming increasingly porous. In Sorting Machines: The Reinvention of the Border in the 21st Century (Polity, 2022) Steffen Mau shows that this view is misleading: borders are not getting more permeable in the era of globalization, but rather are being turned into powerf…
 
Content note: This episode contains discussions of suicide, as well as allusions to graphic anti-LGBTQ+ and anti-Black violence Advances in LGBTQ rights in the recent past—marriage equality, the repeal of Don't Ask, Don't Tell, and the expansion of hate crimes legislation—have been accompanied by a rise in attacks against trans, queer and/or gender…
 
International criminal justice is, at its core, an anti-atrocity project. Yet just what an 'atrocity' is remains undefined and undertheorized. Randle C. DeFalco's book Invisible Atrocities: The Aesthetic Biases of International Criminal Justice (Cambridge UP, 2022) examines how associations between atrocity commission and the production of horrific…
 
In this episode, we spoke to Dr. Saeed Bagheri, lecturer of International Law at the University of Reading about the women-led protests in Iran, sparked in response to the arrest of Mahsa Amini by the morality police and her subsequent death. Transcript available on the Oxford Human Rights Hub website: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk…
 
By any reasonable metric, prisons as they exist in the United States and in many other countries are normatively unacceptable. What is the proper moral response to this? Can prisons and the practices surrounding incarceration feasibly be reformed, or should the entire enterprise be abolished? If the latter, then what? If the former, what are the ne…
 
Human Rights and Justice host Nkechi Taifa conducts a riveting interview with the only surviving son of the Honorable Marcus Garvey - Dr. Julius Garvey, and Attorney Justin Hansford, US Representaife to the UN Forum on People of African Descent. This discussion is chock full of historical and contemporary tidbits. Don’t miss it!…
 
Human Rights and Justice host Nkechi Taifa interviews Edward Sargent, independent journalist, editor of Claud Anderson's pivotal works, and author of a soon-to-be released series focused on the relationship between law enforcement and Black people - the War in America Volumes I and II.Nkechi による
 
Human Rights and Justice Host Nkechi Taifa interviews members of the International Civil Society Delegation as they bring critical diasporic African issues to the front at historic international convening in Switzerland. Esteemed guests include: Dr. Amara Enyia, JD PhD - joining from Geneva. Dr. Amara is chair of the Intl Civil Society Working Grou…
 
Rabbi Ron Kronish spent thirty years directing the Interreligious Coordinating Council in Israel (ICCI), an interfaith organization devoted to promoting dialogue in Israel. Utilizing the tools of interfaith dialogue, the ICCI became a “council of organizations…as a tool in peacebuilding throughout the 1990’s, until 2015.” (From the introduction.) I…
 
Is medical assistance in dying, or MAID letting the government off the hook from providing what they should be providing? Should we respect people's choices on harm reduction grounds, even if those choices are severely constrained by an unjust social and political context? Should we give doctors this power over the mentally ill and disabled, given …
 
How has digitalisation changed Russian politics? How has Russia’s invasion of Ukraine changed Russia studies? What is special about Russia’s approach to algorithmic governance and internet control? Assistant Professor in Cyber-Security and Politics from Maastricht University, Mariëlle Wijermars, talks about her ongoing research on Russian politics,…
 
On the occasion of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women and the 16 Days Campaign against SGBV, we met with Tyson Nicholas and Julia Dalman to discuss the issue of Conflict Related Sexual Violence (CRSV).Tyson Nicholas is currently the Staff Officer Gender, Peace and Security in the Royal Australian Navy. He has previo…
 
On the occasion of this auspicious day, we met with Tyson Nicholas and Julia Dalman to discuss the issue of Conflict Related Sexual Violence (CRSV).Tyson Nicholas is currently the Staff Officer Gender, Peace and Security in the Royal Australian Navy. He has previously served as the Military Expert on Investigations of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse …
 
The boundary that once protected our intimate lives from outside interests is an artefact of the 20th century. In the 21st, we have embraced a vast array of technology that enables constant access and surveillance of the most private aspects of our lives. From non-consensual pornography, to online extortion, to the sale of our data for profit, we a…
 
Chasing Wrongs and Rights: My Experience Defending Human Rights Around the World (Simon & Schuster, 2022) by Elaine Pearson, the Asia Director at Human Rights Watch, is an intimate account of her journey fighting for human rights across the world. Part personal journey, part insider’s peek into the work of international human rights organizations, …
 
In Canada, the last time housing was considered to be affordable, relative to income, was in 2004 The average price of a home in the Toronto area, the country’s most populated, is more than $1 million. In Quebec too, where the housing market has been historically affordable, there has been a significant decline in affordability over recent years. I…
 
Human Rights Sentinel Talk with Prime Minister in Exile of East Turkistan Salih Hudayar Salih Hudayar is an Uyghur American politician advocating for East Turkistan independence. He founded the East Turkistan National Awakening Movement. On November 11, 2019, Hudayar was elected as the Prime Minister of the East Turkistan Government-in-Exile. Huday…
 
In Wars of Law: Unintended Consequences in the Regulation of Armed Conflict (Cornell UP, 2020), Tanisha M. Fazal assesses the unintended consequences of the proliferation of the laws of war for the commencement, conduct, and conclusion of wars over the course of the past one hundred fifty years. Fazal outlines three main arguments: early laws of wa…
 
Human Rights at Risk: Global Governance, American Power, and the Future of Dignity (Rutgers University Press, 2022) is a fascinating book that brings together social scientists, legal scholars, and humanities scholars from both the Global North and Global South to provide a challenge to understandings about normative and empirical claims to human r…
 
There are Bethesda, MD residents who live atop of and park their cars on a Black American cemetery that has existed for more than a century. Human Rights and Justice host Nkechi Taifa interviews members of the Bethesda African Cemetery Coalition about their fight against government and big business on behalf of our departed ancestors! Featured gues…
 
Host Nkechi Taifa interviews Dr. Akmal Muwwakkil, an herbalist and healer with a Ph.D. in Nutrition. He is a licensed acupuncturist, massage therapist, auricular detoxification expert, Tui Na specialist and a QiGong master. He is an author, master teacher, and coach. The wide-ranging discussion included mental health, enslavement, violence, negativ…
 
Human Rights and Justice host Nkechi Taifa features a book talk with author, activist, scholar Bernard Demczuk, PhD., discussing his novel “Mame’s Spirit: Reparations and Romance, An Afro-Futurist Crime-Mystery Love-Story Re-Mixed with Reparations, Righteousness and West African Spirituality." Mame’s Spirit helps to raise this vital question: How s…
 
Episode 9 of Human Rights and Justice features interviews with two Powerhouse Commentators - Howard University’s Professor Greg Carr and Black Voters Matter co-founder LaTosha Brown. They discuss with host Nkechi Taifa the importance of voting in the upcoming mid-term elections and what’s at stake, concluding with the mantras, “WE WILL NOT BLACK DO…
 
Societies that are throwing off the yoke of authoritarian rule and beginning to build democracies face a daunting question: should they punish the representatives of the ancien regime or let bygones be bygones? In her interview, Professor Ruti Teitel talks both about these choices and more broadly about transitional justice as a field. Her book, Tr…
 
Esther Dingemans is an expert in programmes that respond to conflict-related sexual violence. She worked for several years in humanitarian programmes on sexual and gender-based violence in several countries in Africa and the Middle East. She is the executive director at the Global Survivors Fund and the Mukwege Foundation. In this episode, she was …
 
In this episode, we speak to Justice Steven Majiedt of the Constitutional Court of South Africa on the unique history of South African constitutionalism, whether the constitution can bring about transformation and the future of socio-economic rights protection in light of COVID and the cost-of-living crisis.…
 
For this episode in the Pathways to Peace series, the focus is on the particular impact of violence and insecurity on women and girls. My guest is Reem Alsalem who, for 17 years until 2016, worked with the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, and then became an independent consultant in humanitarian action and refugee protection. She is now the UN Sp…
 
The Kafala system is a form of worker sponsorship that allows private citizens and companies almost total control over the employment and immigration status of migrant workers. Lebanon has some 250,000 migrant domestic workers, most of them women from Africa and Asia. The labour laws do not provide them protections that other workers have, like a m…
 
What is the best way to achieve societal harmony in a place in which groups of people with different identities are living together. Should minority groups be given exemptions from general policies and laws or is it better to say majority privilege should be removed by finding solutions in which the law applies equally to the minority and the major…
 
Anthropological Witness: Lessons from the Khmer Rouge Tribunal (Cornell UP, 2022) tells the story of Alexander Laban Hinton's encounter with an accused architect of genocide and, more broadly, Hinton's attempt to navigate the promises and perils of expert testimony. In March 2016, Hinton served as an expert witness at the Extraordinary Chambers in …
 
The Keeper’s new Sports & Rights season kicks off with something a little different – a joint episode hosted by Dr. Katrina Lantos Swett and Tim Horgan, Executive Director of the World Affairs Council of New Hampshire and host of the Global in the Granite State podcast. Katrina and Tim join forces for a dynamic conversation about the complex and of…
 
Donald Bloxham and Dirk Moses have offered us a unique opportunity--a chance to see authors and editors in conversation with each other and themselves about the state and nature of Genocide Studies. Genocide: Key Themes (Oxford University Press, 2022) emerged out of an effort to update and slim down their earlier, larger volume The Oxford Handbook …
 
Should everyone have privacy in their personal lives? Can privacy exist in a public place? Is there a right to be left alone, even in the United States? The battle between an individual’s right to privacy and the public’s right to know has been fought for centuries. You may be surprised to realize that the original framers were sensitive to the imp…
 
How do states coerce citizens into compliance while simultaneously minimizing backlash? In Outsourcing Repression: Everyday State Power in Contemporary China (Oxford UP, 2020), Lynette H. Ong examines how the Chinese state engages nonstate actors, from violent street gangsters to nonviolent grassroots brokers, to coerce and mobilize the masses for …
 
Experimentation on animals—particularly humans—is often assumed to be a uniquely modern phenomenon. But the ideas and attitudes that encourage biological and medical scientists to experiment on living creatures date from the earliest expressions of Western thought. In Experimenting with Humans and Animals: From Aristotle to CRISPR (Johns Hopkins UP…
 
The contemporary internet's de facto business model is one of surveillance. Browser cookies follow us around the web, Amazon targets us with eerily prescient ads, Facebook and Google read our messages and analyze our patterns, and apps record our every move. In Profit over Privacy: How Surveillance Advertising Conquered the Internet (U Minnesota Pr…
 
In March 2022 the U.S. government announced its determination that genocide was committed by the Myanmar military against Rohingya communities in Myanmar’s Rakhine State in 2017. What will this mean for the roughly one million Rohingya refugees living in neighboring countries, for Rohingya IDPs in Rakhine, and for post-coup Myanmar? In this episode…
 
The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 officially ended the explicit prejudice in American immigration policy that began with the 1790 restriction on naturalization to free White persons of “good character.” By the 1980s, the rest of the Anglo-European world had followed suit, purging discriminatory language from their immigration laws and ach…
 
In February 2021, Myanmar military leaders removed the democratically elected party from power and took control of the government. In the year following, at least 1,700 civilians, including children, have been killed by the junta forces and some 10,000 arrested. Media outlets have been closed, and journalists arrested, beaten and tortured. Some hav…
 
There are currently a record-setting number of forcibly displaced persons in the world. This number continues to rise as solutions to alleviate humanitarian catastrophes of large-scale violence and displacement continue to fail. The likelihood of the displaced returning to their homes is becoming increasingly unlikely. In many cases, their homes ha…
 
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