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Join Dave Chaffins on a geographic exploration of your favorite video games. Each week we discuss a brand new subject in the "science of where" and how it relates to games like Pokemon, Zelda, Fallout, and many more. It's the most fun way to refresh and learn your geography knowledge.
 
Geography and Plays is a 1922 collection of Gertrude Stein's "word portraits," or stream-of-consciousness writings. These stream-of-consciousness experiments, rhythmical essays or "portraits", were designed to evoke "the excitingness of pure being" and can be seen as literature's answer to Cubism, plasticity, and collage. Although the book has been described as "a marvellous and painstaking achievement in setting down approximately 80,000 words which mean nothing at all," it is considered to ...
 
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The digital age has thrown questions of representation, participation and humanitarianism back to the fore, as machine learning, algorithms and big data centres take over the process of mapping the subjugated and subaltern. Since the rise of Google Earth in 2005, there has been an explosion in the use of mapping tools to quantify and assess the nee…
 
News: ArcMap (10.8) End of Life outlined Esri releases beta ArcGIS Maps SDK for Unity and Unreal Engine Drones in the supply chain Hivemapper studio Microsoft releases building footprints for Australia Topic: This week we riff on the title of a recent AAG seminar to discuss how Geography relates to closely related fields … “encroachment or opportun…
 
It's time to get spooked as we talk with the wonderful crew of Rick, Shaline, and Vendortron from We Just Love games. Let's talk Resident Evil, survival, horror, survival horror, halloween, spookiness, and the crippling disease affecting the world. Check out Gamestack and That Fallout Show! Check out more Geography Arcade…
 
In his new book, Where Caciques and Mapmakers Met: Border Making in Eighteenth-Century South America (UNC Press, 2020), Dr. Jeffrey Erbig charts the interplay between imperial and indigenous spatial imaginaries and shows the critical role that indigenous actors played in imperial border-making between the Spanish and the Portuguese in the Río de la…
 
What is the relationship between race, technology and sound? How can we access the ways that Latin Americans in the 19th and early 20th centuries thought about, and importantly, heard, race? In his book Audible Geographies in Latin America: Sounds of Race and Place (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019), Dylon Robbins approaches this question in a stunning ser…
 
The Red Sea has, from time immemorial, been one of the world’s most navigated spaces, in the pursuit of trade, pilgrimage and conquest. Yet this multidimensional history remains largely unrevealed by its successive protagonists. Intrigued by the absence of a holistic portrayal of this body of water and inspired by Fernand Braudel’s famous work on t…
 
News: Facebook’s Project Aria - mapping your entire life Augmented Reality - Geology’s ‘killer app’....? Amazon’s ‘Virtual Tours’ Oct 4th - Sputnik anniversary World Space Week Oct. 4-10th - Satellites are the Theme - Cool Stuff: Zuni Map - Counter-mapping place
 
Intrinsic to the practice of empire is the creation of boundaries. We tend to think of such boundaries as borders, physical lines of demarcation past which the empire’s sovereignty has no purchase. But, in fact, the picture is much fuzzier than that. A foundational task of empire is to define, to categorize, and in so doing, to make peoples and pla…
 
Water and diplomatic historian Dan MacFarlane has written a fascinating book on a fundamental debate in environmental history: What is a natural landscape? Fixing Niagara Falls: Environment, Energy, and Engineers at the World’s Most Famous Waterfall (UBC Press, 2020) argues that one of the world's most famous natural attractions is not wholly natur…
 
John W. Traphagan’s Cosmopolitan Rurality, Depopulation, and Entrepreneurial Ecosystems in 21st-Century Japan (Cambria Press, 2020) presents a series of deeply contextualized ethnographies of small-business entrepreneurs and the entrepreneurial ecosystem of contemporary rural Japan. Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, Japan has been ex…
 
Blessed with numerous safe harbors, accessible ports, and a rich hinterland, Gujarat has been central to the history of Indian Ocean maritime exchange that involved not only goods, but also people and ideas. Transregional Trade and Traders: Situating Gujarat in the Indian Ocean from Early Times to 1900 (Oxford University Press) maps the trajectory …
 
Dave joins Aramithius to do the deepest of dives on Elder Scrolls Morrowinds as your regular expert becomes the student. Starting with the lore, we explore religion, philosophy, politics, ecosystems and what the future of Morrowind may be. Vivec is starting a cult and philosphy professors love a certain Terminator. This and more on the podcast! lin…
 
Last chance to respond to U.S. Census Weather NOAA Turns 50! Fastest run to greek letters for Atlantic Tropical Storms Western US Wildfires La Nina Sentinel 6 launch planned for November Startup Satellite Vu looking to add thermal to commercial remote sensing 2020 StoryMaps Competition Esri signs MoU with UN-Habitat Esri acquires nFrames HP Rolls o…
 
Going Nowhere Fast: Mobile Inequality in the Age of Translocality (Oxford UP, 2020) brings together more than a decade’s worth of research during one of the most consequential moments in Cambodian history. After years of staggering economic growth and a political breakthrough in 2013, disappointment set in as the fruits of this growth failed to rea…
 
The Mekong River is one of the world’s great rivers. From its source in the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau it snakes down through southern China and then borders or runs through all the countries of mainland Southeast Asia: Myanmar, Thailand, Lao, Cambodia and Vietnam. Almost 70 million people depend either directly or indirectly on the Mekong for their l…
 
In the thoroughly researched, lucidly narrated new book Shareholder Cities: Land Transformations Along Urban Corridors in India (University of Pennsylvania Press), Sai Balakrishnan (Assistant Professor of City and Urban Planning at UC Berkeley) examines the novel phenomenon of the conversion of agrarian landowners into urban shareholders in India’s…
 
This week we continue our conversation about how visualization can help to convey information and how state and school systems may (or may not) be using visualization tools for varying purposes in our current time of uncertainty. The conversation began in the previous part of the episode.
 
Dave asks Jameson from The Download: Alternative Gaming News Podcast to talk about Star Wars in the world of video games. Why are the Galactic Empire considered the bad guys in the series? Dave dives into the history behind the producers of the stormtroopers. Check out Geography Arcade social, patreon, etc. here! Check out our sponsor offers…
 
This week we look at some news around drones and information literacy and we begin the first part of a conversation about geoviz for information sharing. Amazon gets ok to test drone delivery Parrot gets Army contract AI and ML in geospatial Examples from conversation WVDE Schools Re-Entry Map WVDHHR Dashboard…
 
Who owns the street? This is the question that animates The Struggle for the Streets of Berlin: Politics, Consumption, and Urban Space, 1914-1945 (Cambridge University Press) by Molly Loberg. Interwar Berliners faced this question with great hope yet devastating consequences. In Germany, the First World War and 1918 Revolution transformed the city …
 
While the term ‘Europe’ was used sporadically in ancient and medieval times, it proliferated between the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, and gained a prevalence in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries which it did not possess before. Although studies on the history of the idea of Europe abound, much of the vast body of early modern sources h…
 
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