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コンテンツは レアジョブ英会話 によって提供されます。エピソード、グラフィック、ポッドキャストの説明を含むすべてのポッドキャスト コンテンツは、レアジョブ英会話 またはそのポッドキャスト プラットフォーム パートナーによって直接アップロードされ、提供されます。誰かがあなたの著作物をあなたの許可なく使用していると思われる場合は、ここで概説されているプロセスに従うことができますhttps://ja.player.fm/legal
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Japan has fallen hard for its hot, slurpy ramen noodles

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Manage episode 420815544 series 2530089
コンテンツは レアジョブ英会話 によって提供されます。エピソード、グラフィック、ポッドキャストの説明を含むすべてのポッドキャスト コンテンツは、レアジョブ英会話 またはそのポッドキャスト プラットフォーム パートナーによって直接アップロードされ、提供されます。誰かがあなたの著作物をあなたの許可なく使用していると思われる場合は、ここで概説されているプロセスに従うことができますhttps://ja.player.fm/legal
Spicy, steaming, slurpy ramen may be everyone’s favorite Japanese food. In Tokyo, long lines circle around blocks, and waiting an hour for your favorite ramen is normal. Ramen has also surged in popularity in the U.S., South Korea, and other countries in the past 15 years or so. Menus at the top 500 U.S. restaurant chains have 6% more mentions of ramen than they did a year ago, according to Technomic, a research and consulting company for the restaurant industry. Technomic is also starting to see more versions of ramen beyond the traditional soup. Del Taco, a Mexican chain, recently introduced Shredded Beef Birria Ramen, for example. “There’s all kinds of different ramen styles today,” says Frank Striegl, a Filipino American who grew up in Tokyo. “Even wacky ramen on the tour, for example, there’s pork bone ramen with pesto.” “Noodles and soup around the world is consumed in so many different countries,” says Striegl. “I think because of that, it’s a dish that’s easy to understand. It’s a dish that’s easy to get behind.” Katie Sell, a graduate student taking part in Striegl’s tour, says ramen is different from the American food she grew up with. “It’s so soothing and so warm and it’s got such depth of flavor [...] that doesn't often pop up in the other food that I eat,” she says. While ramen has never been more popular in Japan, ramen places have struggled because of the pandemic, the weakening Japanese yen, and the higher cost of wheat imports and energy, according to a study by Tokyo Shoko Research. One beneficiary of the pandemic is a home delivery service for frozen, professionally-cooked ramen. Called takumen.com, it boasts some 500,000 subscribers in Japan. Another Tokyo operation, Gourmet Innovation, has signed on 250 of Japan's top ramen joints to sell packaged versions of their soup, noodles and toppings, which can be heated up in boiling water and served at home. Co-founder and executive Kenichi Nomaguchi hopes to expand his business overseas. Unlike pasta or curry, ramen is difficult to replicate at home, says Nomaguchi. This article was provided by The Associated Press.
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2232 つのエピソード

Artwork
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Manage episode 420815544 series 2530089
コンテンツは レアジョブ英会話 によって提供されます。エピソード、グラフィック、ポッドキャストの説明を含むすべてのポッドキャスト コンテンツは、レアジョブ英会話 またはそのポッドキャスト プラットフォーム パートナーによって直接アップロードされ、提供されます。誰かがあなたの著作物をあなたの許可なく使用していると思われる場合は、ここで概説されているプロセスに従うことができますhttps://ja.player.fm/legal
Spicy, steaming, slurpy ramen may be everyone’s favorite Japanese food. In Tokyo, long lines circle around blocks, and waiting an hour for your favorite ramen is normal. Ramen has also surged in popularity in the U.S., South Korea, and other countries in the past 15 years or so. Menus at the top 500 U.S. restaurant chains have 6% more mentions of ramen than they did a year ago, according to Technomic, a research and consulting company for the restaurant industry. Technomic is also starting to see more versions of ramen beyond the traditional soup. Del Taco, a Mexican chain, recently introduced Shredded Beef Birria Ramen, for example. “There’s all kinds of different ramen styles today,” says Frank Striegl, a Filipino American who grew up in Tokyo. “Even wacky ramen on the tour, for example, there’s pork bone ramen with pesto.” “Noodles and soup around the world is consumed in so many different countries,” says Striegl. “I think because of that, it’s a dish that’s easy to understand. It’s a dish that’s easy to get behind.” Katie Sell, a graduate student taking part in Striegl’s tour, says ramen is different from the American food she grew up with. “It’s so soothing and so warm and it’s got such depth of flavor [...] that doesn't often pop up in the other food that I eat,” she says. While ramen has never been more popular in Japan, ramen places have struggled because of the pandemic, the weakening Japanese yen, and the higher cost of wheat imports and energy, according to a study by Tokyo Shoko Research. One beneficiary of the pandemic is a home delivery service for frozen, professionally-cooked ramen. Called takumen.com, it boasts some 500,000 subscribers in Japan. Another Tokyo operation, Gourmet Innovation, has signed on 250 of Japan's top ramen joints to sell packaged versions of their soup, noodles and toppings, which can be heated up in boiling water and served at home. Co-founder and executive Kenichi Nomaguchi hopes to expand his business overseas. Unlike pasta or curry, ramen is difficult to replicate at home, says Nomaguchi. This article was provided by The Associated Press.
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2232 つのエピソード

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