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In summer 2016, a police shooting upended the life of Arnaldo Rios Soto, a 26-year-old, non-speaking, autistic man. Aftereffect is Arnaldo’s story – a hidden world of psych wards, physical abuse and chemical restraints – and asks the question: How did Arnaldo’s life go so wrong? Aftereffect by Only Human is produced by WNYC Studios, a listener-supported producer of leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and many others. © WNYC Studios
 
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The Woody Guthrie archive is filled with riches, including some related to "This Land is Your Land," written 80 years ago. WNYC's Sara Fishko visited Woody's daughter, Nora, for a journey through a bit of Guthrie history in this archival Fishko Files, produced for his centenary in 2012.WNYC Studios による
 
In the run-up to the election, we’re all listening to speeches - and many of them are grappling with the very idea of America: what do we want America to be? This episode of Fishko Files goes back to the World War II era, when, as WNYC's Sara Fishko tells us, Hollywood movies were asking the same question - or rather, answering it. Jeanine Basinger…
 
After nearly 70 years on newsstands, Playboy Magazine has ended its print run. In this archival episode produced for The United States of Anxiety, WNYC's Sara Fishko tells the story of Hugh Hefner, whose notion of the "Indoor Man" made Playboy a midcentury staple. The United States of Anxiety is coming to radio this Sunday, August 23 at 6pm, airing…
 
The artist David Wojnarowicz (1954-1992) was recently honored with a quilt created by friends and admirers in his memory. Wojnarowicz, who made art that captured his own decline during the AIDS crisis, was the subject of a Whitney Museum show that inspired this Fishko Files. (Produced in 2018). Cynthia Carr's book Fire in the Belly: The Life and Ti…
 
Pianist and singer Hazel Scott was born in Trinidad a century ago, in the summer of 1920. Scott is well-remembered for her sparkling piano technique, as well as her style - but her biography reveals a powerful character with a rich and layered life behind the glamour. More in this archival Fishko Files. (Produced in 2009)…
 
The death of actress and star Olivia de Havilland a few days ago has stirred many memories and considerations. WNYC's Sara Fishko chimes in for this episode of Fishko Files. William Wyler's The Heiress (1949) airs on TCM next month and is available on DVD and Blu-Ray from Criterion and Amazon. From the New Yorker: a consideration of the "last lione…
 
Annie Ross, the singer and actress who died this week at 89, was one-third of the phenomenally successful jazz vocal group Lambert Hendricks and Ross. Its heady days of success, as well as Ross herself, were recalled by the late Jon Hendricks - who spoke with WNYC's Sara Fishko in this archival edition of Fishko Files. (Produced in 2011)…
 
A cultural movement of Black writers and artists was flourishing a century ago in uptown New York, and it’s being remembered now with various virtual events. As WNYC’s Sara Fishko tells us in this episode of Fishko Files, the Harlem Renaissance movement was rich with ideas. Emily Bernard is a professor at the University of Vermont and the editor of…
 
Composer and arranger Johnny Mandel died last Monday at the age of 94. In the sixty years prior, he gave us standards such as “Emily” and “The Shadow of Your Smile,” and ushered in an era of jazz-inflected movies with his 1958 score for the film “I Want to Live.” WNYC’s Sara Fishko spoke to him about that period in this archival Fishko Files, produ…
 
This archival Fishko Files was produced in 2006 - the year musician and manager John Levy was given the prestigious title of "Jazz Master" by the National Endowment for the Arts. His profound impact on music could be seen in many forms, and for many decades. Levy died in January 2012, just three months shy of his 100th birthday.…
 
Some of the major struggles and victories of the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s coincided with a most active period for jazz music. WNYC's Sara Fishko looks at a few cases where the movement and the music came together, in this edition of Fishko Files. Featuring music by Max Roach, Duke Ellington, and Dave Brubeck, among others. Max Roach's We …
 
A documentary film about the late, infamous lawyer Roy Cohn premieres tonight. As WNYC's Sara Fishko tells us, the variety of films and dramatic portrayals of Cohn reveal a figure both fascinating and repellent. More in this episode of Fishko Files. Bully. Coward. Victim. The Story of Roy Cohn premieres tonight at 9pm on HBO. Where's My Roy Cohn?, …
 
The Depression-era novel Miss Lonelyhearts, by Nathanael West, has been called "the purest expression of despair that American literature has produced, in any era." As WNYC's Sara Fishko tells us in this Fishko Files, 80 years after the author's death the book - about the descent into darkness of an advice columnist - still rings true. Miss Lonelyh…
 
20 years ago, a book by David Margolick reminded us of the power of a historic song about lynching, Strange Fruit - made famous by the great Billie Holiday. As Americans march against systemic racism, this archival Fishko Files with Lena Horne and others on the song that some say changed the world. (Produced in 2000)…
 
In this crisis, we're all looking at things a little differently, including movies both new and old. Are we losing ourselves in culture, or are we finding ourselves? A little of both, says WNYC's Sara Fishko, in this episode of Fishko Files. The Best Years of Our Lives, Rear Window, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Gold Diggers of 1933, and Follow the Fleet …
 
Charlie Chaplin entertained his way through the crises of the 20th century: his first appearance on the screen coincided with the start of World War I. During the Great Depression, audiences flocked to his Modern Times, a memorably satirical take on the era. He lampooned Hitler in The Great Dictator in 1940. Later on, he had a run-in with McCarthyi…
 
Joel Meyerowitz's new book is called "How I Make Photographs." But nearly 20 years ago he became known for another book, one that documented the armies of workers turning chaos into order after the 9/11 attacks. WNYC's Sara Fishko has more in this Fishko Files. Joel Meyerowitz's photographs of Ground Zero can be seen in the Phaidon book Aftermath. …
 
We learned earlier this week of the death of the remarkable and absolutely irreplaceable music producer Hal Willner, whom Sara Fishko interviewed at length and profiled for a Fishko Files in 2018. Willner died of complications from coronavirus. His knowledge and love of music - and sense of fun - gave an indelible, personal slant to everything he p…
 
During the last presidential campaign season, Elia Kazan's film A Face in the Crowd caught on for the way its story mirrored, to some degree, that of our current president's rise to power. As we watch the official, increasingly self-promotional daily briefings on our current crisis, Face comes to mind again. Though WNYC's Sara Fishko recommends her…
 
As you may have noticed, says WNYC’s Sara Fishko, the new production of West Side Story has sharply divided the critics, who’ve been using a range of adjectives to describe it - from “gutsy and exhilarating” to “infuriating!” When the show was brand new, in 1957, the creators then, too, awaited the reviews. The late Arthur Laurents, who wrote the o…
 
The Whitney's new show Vida Americana reveals the impact of Mexico’s revolutionary art of the '20s on American realism - and it has WNYC's Sara Fishko thinking about one of Mexico’s most radical composers of that period. More in this archival Fishko Files. (Produced in 2002) Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925-1945 continues…
 
David Lang’s one-act opera The Loser tells the story of two fictional piano students - both Glenn Gould wannabes - whose lives are turned upside down by their idolatry and frustration. Just before the work’s premiere in 2016, WNYC’s Sara Fishko spoke to Lang for this Fishko Files. David Lang's The Loser has just been released digitally and on CD.…
 
One of the most eccentric and interesting artistic partnerships of the 20th century, as WNYC's Sara Fishko tells us, was the collaboration between the composer Virgil Thomson and the writer and poet Gertrude Stein. Together, the two were instrumental in inventing American opera. More, in this episode of Fishko Files. The Metropolitan Museum of Art'…
 
As the Met Opera's production of Porgy and Bess enters its final weeks, WNYC's Sara Fishko sorts through the long, checkered history of the piece in this archival Fishko Files - produced during the polarizing 2012 Broadway revival. Porgy and Bess continues at the Met Opera through February 15.WNYC Studios による
 
It's forty years since Stanley Kubrick's The Shining showed us just what the remarkable Steadicam could do to our perception and sense of movement. This archival Fishko Files tells the story of its invention, the product of an unlikely obsession by a frustrated cameraman on a mission to perfect! (Produced in 2016)…
 
Since early fall, a corner of the Whitney Museum has been devoted to the sounds, thoughts, and visions of the jazz pianist and composer Jason Moran. As the year turns, the show goes into its final days. More from WNYC's Sara Fishko, in this edition of Fishko Files. Jason Moran's show at the Whitney closes on January 5, with final jazz performances …
 
The film Marriage Story starts streaming on Netflix today. It was in December 1979 that another well-acted, thoughtful film about divorce opened to mostly raves for its writer-director, Robert Benton - who is Sara Fishko's guest on this edition of Fishko Files. Kramer vs. Kramer, Places in the Heart, and many other Benton films are available on Ama…
 
“Heart and Soul,” a 1930s song of modest melody and lilting rhythm, occupies a special place in the culture of piano-playing. Without its lyrics - with just its simple, jaunty tune - it’s become an iconic American tradition, especially at the holiday season's social gatherings. Why? WNYC’s Sara Fishko meditates on the mysteries of a popular tune. (…
 
In the days following September 11th, television united Americans as it had few times before. In this special edition for On the Media, WNYC's Sara Fishko takes us back to November 22nd, 1963 - the Friday before Thanksgiving, when the medium was feeling its way, for the first time, through a devastating tragedy. (Produced in 2001)…
 
This weekend, Film Forum kicks off a 13-film festival celebrating the actor and filmmaker Lee Grant. In the prime of her career - her "ingénue years," as she calls them - she was blacklisted by the House Committee on Un-American Activities, rendering her unemployable in Hollywood. She spoke to WNYC's Sara Fishko in 2014 about those years, and the b…
 
World War I presented civilization with unprecedented violence and destruction. The shock of the first modern, “industrial” war extended far into the 20th century and even into the 21st, and changed how people saw the world and themselves. And that was reflected in the cultural responses to the war – which included a burgeoning obsession with beaut…
 
World War 1 officially ended in 1919, and as WNYC's Sara Fishko tells us, its impact on art and culture during and after the war can still be felt. One early response to the war came from artists searching for a way to express their shock. More, in this edition of Fishko Files. Next Thursday, November 7 at 7pm, Sara Fishko will be live in The Green…
 
With Halloween looming, WNYC's Sara Fishko relates the story of "Isle of the Dead" - a dark, mysterious 19th century painting that captivated a whole generation. More in this episode of Fishko Files. Fishko Files with Sara Fishko Assistant Producer: Olivia BrileyMix Engineer: Wayne ShulmisterEditor: Karen Frillmann…
 
This Monday, the Guggenheim Museum celebrates 60 years since the opening of its arresting Frank Lloyd Wright building on Fifth Avenue. As WNYC's Sara Fishko tells us, the building and New York had much to offer each other. On October 21 and throughout the rest of the month, the Guggenheim features music, tours, and conversations to commemorate the …
 
For decades, Dodsworth has been one of William Wyler's underappreciated films, despite Walter Huston's Oscar-winning performance and the familiarity of the material; it began as a Sinclair Lewis novel and had a life as a Broadway play as well. However - underappreciated no longer! Dodsworth will be shown at the New York Film Festival tonight, Thurs…
 
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