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In part 1 @CleoKenington, ASGBI lead for Sustainability, told us about the huge problem healthcare has with greenhouse emissions and what to do about improving pathways to minimise healthcare impact, In this eposode Cleo tell us what each of us can do once the patient gets to theatre. Practical solutions for all surgeons to embrace. Be part of the …
 
In the UK, the National Health Service accounts for 5.4% of the carbon emissions for the whole country! Surgery accounts for 5-10% of this total. The target is an 80% reduction in greenhouse emissions by 2028. Find out what's going on and what you and your unit can do to save slow global warming in this podcast by @CleoKenington, Emergency Surgeon …
 
All you need to know about investigation and treatment of this common and serious condition. Indications for pneumatic or hydrostatic reduction, plus operative intervention and complications are all covered. There are fantastic, beautifully handwritten notes to accompany both podcasts that you can download here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1BTN…
 
David Kiely asks Shalinder Singh about intussusception, a common and serious cause of abdominal pain in children aged 3 months to 3 years. This podcast covers all you need to know about the incidence, history and examination of intussusception. Part 2 covers investigation and treatment. Accompanying notes can be downloaded from here https://drive.g…
 
You'll need to operate on about 1/3 patients with SBO. Matt Lee tells you what approach is best and when, and how to look after your patients after the operation Matt Lee is Clinical Lecturer in Surgery at the University of Sheffield and a recognised leader in the management of SBO
 
Who's going to settle with drip and suck and who isn't? Matt Lee tells you how to tell, who to operate on and when and not to forget that patients with small bowel obstruction need feeding! Further reading: https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/9/7/e029235.abstract
 
If the National Audit of Small Bowel Obstruction was a car, Matt Lee is the engine and most of the other moving parts. In this podcast Matt (@wannabehawkeye) talks about NASBO and its main findings and recommendations. Further reading here: https://academic.oup.com/bjsopen/article/3/3/354/6060819
 
All you need to know about the diagnosis and management of hydrocoele in children. How it is different from hydrocoeles in adults and the central importance of the processus vaginalis, differential diagnosis, investigations and treatment are all covered. Special cases of hydrocoele of the Canal of Nuck and the abdomino-scrotal hydrocoele are also c…
 
In part 2 of this podcast learn how to deal with emergency presentations of inguinal hernia in children, top tips on how to reduce an inguinal hernia in children, indications and timing of surgery and what to tell parents. Operative approach and special considerations for females with inguinal hernia are also discussed. Essential listening for trai…
 
Inguinal hernias are one of the most common conditions in paediatric surgery and this podcast is essential listening for anyone dealing with hernais in children in primary of secondary care. How paediatric hernias different are from adult hernias, predisposing factors for hernia and the central importance of the patient processus vaginalis are disc…
 
Now you know how much fluid to give, Shalinder Singh tells David Keily what fluid to use and why in a range of settings from trauma to pyloric stenosis to maintenance fluids in children. When and why to use crystalloid or colloid is explained. Side effects of using the wrong fluids are also covered, including acid/base balance problems and ARDS. Es…
 
Prescribing fluids in paediatric surgical patients can be daunting. This podcast tells you easy to remember ways of recognising the degree of fluid loss, why signs like diastolic hypertension are important and a method of calculating how much fluid to prescribe whatever the age of your patient. David Keily talks to Shalinder Singh about dehydration…
 
Third podcast in the ECG series this is an easy to follow, step by step way to recognise and interpret ECGs (EKGs) in acute coronary syndromes, ST-elevation myocardial infarction, and non ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Dr. Julia Baron's legendary teaching captured in a podcast
 
All you need to know about the treatment of haemorrhoids with Professor Steve Brown, the brains behind the HubBLe trail. Definitions, conservative, outpatient and operative treatments in standard and special situations are covered, and the evidence for each. Steve also tells us why we should use the same outcome parameters in future trials in haemo…
 
Learn the basics of the ECG - why it looks like it does, how each of the chest and limb leads "look at" the heart, what the P, Q R, S and T waves represent in the heart itself and how to work out the axis of the ECG amongst a load of other essential basics you need to know before you can begin to interpret an ECG further. Hannah Phillips talks to J…
 
Recorded at the International Conference of Anal Fistula Treatment in Rome 2018, Techniques in Coloproctology interview Phil Tozer, a consultant at the world famous St Mark's Hospital, UK about current treatments for anal fistula. Phil takes us through why not to place a seton in the acute setting, the 5 factors preventing healing of fistulas, and …
 
Professor Susan Anderson helps you recognise and understand the similarities and differences between the microscopic appearances of skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle. All you need to know. Susan Anderson is Professor of Pathology at the University of Nottingham, UK
 
Professor Susan Anderson shows you the microscopic structure of the largest organ in the body - the skin. All you need to know about the structure and the cells of the skin and associated glands and hairs. Great for learning, revising for exams or if you're just interested to see what you look like down the microscope…
 
Professor Susan Anderson shows us what the layers of cells that cover our outsides and our insides look like down the microscope. Learn how to recognise each type of epithelium and why they need to be different. Also learn the suprising meaning of the word epithelium...
 
Susan Anderson shows you the layers of the kidney, and how the function of the kidney depends on its microscopic anatomy. SHe takes you on a tour of the glomerulus, Bowman's capsule, the juxtaglomerular apparatus, loop of Henle and the collecting ducts, telling you all you need to know about the structure and cell types involved. Susan Anderson is …
 
The management of early rectal cancer is becoming increasingly complex.Find out all you need to know about diagnosis, staging, treatment, follow up and prognosis in this podcast. Steve Schlichtemeier is the colorectal robotic surgical fellow at the Royal Derby Hospital, UK and Bill Speake is a consultant colorectal surgeon and recent past ECAG lead…
 
In the second podcast on radiotherapy, Sindu Vivekanandan explains to Keaton Jones what is meant by the terms adjuvant and neoadjuvant, what the 3 main ways of delivering radiotherapy are, in which tumour radiotherapy is effective and in which it isn't, and the limiting factors and side effects associated with radiotherapy. Essential listening for …
 
Keaton Jones asks Sindu Vivekanandan what is radiotherapy, how it works and why we use it. Dose and fractionation are explained along with the '4Rs' of radiobiology: repair, reassortment, repopulation and reoxygenation. Toxicity is discussed as well as methods for increasing the effect of treatment on target tissues. Essential listening for surgeon…
 
Rick Nelson knows more about anal fissure than almost anyone in the world and has recently published a comprehensive meta-analysis of the evidence supporting treatment for anal fissure in the leading journal, Techniques in Coloproctology. There are some surprises that will challenge what you think you know about efficacy of topical treatments, anal…
 
How to recognise and immediately manage complications of sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypass are discussed in the second part of this podcast. Understand why bariatric patients clinical examination might be unreliable, why vomiting or jaundice are danger symptoms which may need emergency intervention, why NSAIDs and smoking are very dangerous in …
 
You're not a bariatric surgeon, but you need to know how the immediate management of complications of bariatric surgery because they might well come in to your hospital, even if its not a bariatric surgical centre. In the first of 2 podcasts, Cat Boereboom talks to Sherif Awad about recognition of complications of gastric band and what to do when y…
 
For decades the only real option for perforated diverticular disease was a Hartmann's procedure, but there has been a lot of interest in the less invasive and stoma saving laparoscopic lavage and drainage procedure as an alternative. But is it effective? Jon Lund talks to David Humes about the background and the evidence for and against peritoneal …
 
A host of practical tips on difficult urethral catheter insertion, changing a suprapubic catheter, managing a 3-way catheter, what to do when you're called about testicular pain, paraphimosis or a nephrostomy. When you have listened to this podcast by Philly Horner and Suzie Hall you will be much more confident about how to manage these common prob…
 
Dr Ruediger Prosst, Director of The Proctological Institute in Stuttgart, Germany, tells Jon Lund about his experience in treating the often challenging problem of high and complex anal fistula using a novel, sphincter sparing clipping device. This podcast links to Tech Coloproctol (2016) 20: 753. doi:10.1007/s10151-016-1537-0…
 
"Doctor, Mrs Smith's calcium is 2.9, what do you want me to do?" Cat Boereboom talks to Roger Stanworth about all aspects of the presentation, diagnosis and treatment of both high and low calcium. Once you've listened to this podcast you will know how to manage any calcium disorder. Mapped to the General Surgery 2016 curriculum, this podcast is als…
 
Philly Horner talks to Gill Tierney about the presentation, diagnosis and treatment of small bowel obstruction, a very common condition presenting as an emergency. This podcast contains all you need to know if you're a medical student, foundation doctor (intern), or early years trainee in surgery. Sorry about the sound in places, this was recorded …
 
All you need to know about how to interpret the results of a meta analysis in 14 minutes and 15 seconds. If you find yourself in an exam and asked to review a meta analysis in an interview or an exam, or even if you're reading one in a journal to inform your clinical practice, this will be the best 1/4 hour you have spent in ages. If you want a mor…
 
When you are doing surgery you need to know what the instruments are called and what they are used for. In this easy to follow guide, Jon Lund and June Brown take you through the instruments you will find on a basic surgical tray, the most common tray you will use when you are starting surgery. You'll learn the names of the instruments, why there a…
 
A is the first letter of ABC and is the first thing to get right when managing a trauma patient. It can be very challenging and time is pressured. In this advanced level podcast for anaesthetists and surgeons involved in trauma management, Andrew Deytrikh talks to Craig Morris about how to manage the airway in critically ill and unstable patients, …
 
Meta analysis is a very common way of bringing together data to help us decide which treatments might be best. BUT, you have to take care when interpreting them - there's a lot more to it than just looking which side of the line the little black diamond is on! How do you construct a search for a systematic review?Can you trust the result of a meta …
 
Knowing how to chose the correct statistical test is essential if you're analysing data, reading a paper or sitting in the academic stations of the FRCS or National Selection. Watch this podcast by statistical guru Brett Doleman and you'll know how to chose the right test or know if the right one has been chosen. Using a step by step, easy to follo…
 
Functional Constipation is a really challenging condition to treat in gastroenterology and surgery. In this podcast Jon Lund asks Robin Spiller about the condition, the underlying physiology, how to differentiate from IBS constipation and the range of treatments for FC. This podcast will tell you all you need to know and more. Robin Spiller is Prof…
 
See if you can get to the correct answers before James Cassidy does in the third and final part of Naomi Laskar's interactive teaching video on causes of chest pain you might see when covering the wards. Really useful things to know in the middle of the night when there's no-one else around!
 
Naomi Laskar puts James Cassidy through his paces again in the second case of chest pain you are likely to come across as an F1/intern on a surgical or other ward. See if you can get the right answers before James in this interactive teaching video. All the benefits of small group teaching without the pain!…
 
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