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Two top doctors present a comprehensive, light-hearted podcast for the hypochondriac in all of us. Christopher Kelly, MD, and Marc Eisenberg, MD, FACC, are highly accomplished physicians and health experts from UNC Health and Columbia University Medical Center, respectively. This podcast is an adaptation of their book "Am I Dying?!: A Complete Guide to Your Symptoms--and What to Do Next," and aims to walk listeners through common symptoms and medical myths to provide a helpful, conversationa ...
 
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The audio play of A History of Water in the Middle East by Sabrina Mahfouz directed by Stef O’Driscoll is available to listen to now until Saturday 30 January 2021. Audiences can listen to the content for free but are invited to pay-what-you-can with all proceeds going directly to the brilliant team who made the work including all the freelance art…
 
Welcome to Am I Dying?!, a light-hearted podcast for the hypochondriac in all of us, hosted by Christopher Kelly, MD, and Marc Eisenberg, MD, FACC, both highly accomplished physicians and health experts from UNC Health and Columbia University Medical Center, respectively. This show is a helpful, conversational guide on what to do when you experienc…
 
The following content may contain strong language. Click here to return to the main podcast page. To subscribe via iTunes click here. To listen on Spotify click here. Full introduction by Simon Stephens: I first met the playwright, poet, performer, presenter, screenwriter, anthologist and librettist Sabrina Mahfouz in the Houses of Parliament. In 2…
 
The following content may contain strong language. Click here to return to the main podcast page. To subscribe via iTunes click here. To listen on Spotify click here. Full introduction by Simon Stephens: One of the challenges of hosting these podcasts is perfecting the art of concision and distillation. There are writers I have had the honour of in…
 
The following content may contain strong language. Click here to return to the main podcast page. To subscribe via iTunes click here. To listen on Spotify click here. Full introduction by Simon Stephens: David Ireland is a man whose family names makes writing short essays about his paradoxical national identity, biography and work tremendously comp…
 
The following content may contain strong language. Click here to return to the main podcast page. To subscribe via iTunes click here. To listen on Spotify click here. Full introduction by Simon Stephens: I sometimes think that our theatrical landscapes are defined as much by the shows we missed and deeply regret missing as they are by the shows tha…
 
The following content may contain strong language. Click here to return to the main podcast page. To subscribe via iTunes click here. To listen on Spotify click here. Full introduction by Simon Stephens: I first came across the writing of Christopher Hampton by accident. In the early 90s I was flicking though the television. This was in the five-ch…
 
The following content may contain strong language. Click here to return to the main podcast page. To subscribe via iTunes click here. To listen on Spotify click here. Full introduction by Simon Stephens: The protest and controversy that surrounded the 2004 production of Gurpreet Kaur Bhatti’s play Bezhiti (Dishnour) at the Birmingham Rep Theatre ha…
 
The following content may contain strong language. Click here to return to the main podcast page. To subscribe via iTunes click here. Full introduction by Simon Stephens: “The first time I saw Zinnie Harris’s Royal Court debut play Nightingale and Chase I was in prison. Specifically I was in Wandsworth prison in South London where I was representin…
 
The following content may contain strong language. Click here to return to the main podcast page. To subscribe via iTunes click here. Full introduction by Simon Stephens: “One of the pleasures of making these podcasts is exploring the work of those writers I am talking to. It is an embarrassing confession that until this month I was entirely ignora…
 
The following content may contain strong language. Click here to return to the main podcast page. To subscribe via iTunes click here. Full introduction by Simon Stephens: “There are a handful of figures in the history of the Royal Court Theatre that define the place. They carved the path that, whether they are aware of it or not every artist that h…
 
The following content may contain strong language. Click here to return to the main podcast page. To subscribe via iTunes click here. Full introduction by Simon Stephens: “There is a clarity and unity of vision to the dramatic world of David Eldridge that seems to land him in a particular tradition of British playwriting that I cherish. Born and ra…
 
The following content may contain strong language. Click here to return to the main podcast page. To subscribe via iTunes click here. Full introduction by Simon Stephens: “There is something of a gesture of disguise to the plays of Laura Wade that I find to be as powerful as it is playful. Her 2005 play Colder Than Here might, for example, have loo…
 
The following content may contain strong language. Click here to return to the main podcast page. To subscribe via iTunes click here. Full introduction by Simon Stephens: “One of the most important figures in the recent history of the Royal Court is the playwright Steven Jeffreys who for fifteen years worked as the Literary Associate here throughou…
 
I first met Simon Stephens in 2011. I was an intern here at the Court and was tanning in the garden in my lunchbreak. Simon was here with his play Wastwater and was taking a moment’s break from rehearsals. I had watched a preview the night before. So I asked him about the ending which left me needing to know for sure whether the character of Jonath…
 
The plays of Timberlake Wertenbaker have been a presence in British theatre since the turn of the 1980s. Since that time she has produced work that is as defined by its sense of poetry and linguistic precision as it is by her characters’ yearning for justice or a sense of a home. Born in New York she was raised in the Basque fishing village of Cibu…
 
There are very few writers I have interviewed or will interview in these podcasts whose curriculum vitae is longer than mine. And certainly none of those are some years younger than me. In this sense, in both his remarkable youth and strikingly prolific output Chris Thorpe has, over the past seventeen years, proven himself quite spectacular. The fo…
 
Few playwrights can claim to have defined a theatrical form or process with quite the same conviction as Alecky Blythe. While she has never claimed to have invented the synthesis of verbatim theatre and the recorded delivery of text, in which actors receive lines through an earpiece and perform immediately in reception of the line, a synthesis that…
 
I was the Writers Tutor here at the Royal Court Theatre in 2001 when Leo Butler, fresh from a beautiful elegiac theatre debut in the 2000 Young Writers Festival with his play Made of Stone, was given a three month residency and shared his office with me. We drank a lot of tea together and ate a fair few biscuits and talked at length about the plays…
 
The experience of watching a play that seems in some way to speak directly or resonate in a way that feels disarmingly personal has lead many playwrights to write for the first time. So it was with Penelope Skinner whom, in 2004, was so startled and moved by Jack Thorne’s When You Cure Me at the Bush theatre that, having spent years writing, as she…
 
When Roy Williams’ first play No Boys Cricket Club launched him into the London theatre world in 1996 it was celebrated for the audacity and range of its theatrical imagination. At a time when new playwrights were often being encouraged to write simple plays for studio theatres, Roy Williams wrote a play that travelled across oceans, across contine…
 
There is a steel and intelligence at the heart of the plays of EV Crowe that has defined her as one of the most arresting of the exciting group of writers to have emerged out of the Young Writers Programme at the Royal Court in the past decade. She studied a masters course in playwriting at the University of East Anglia, one of the most renowned cr…
 
In some ways Nathaniel Martello-White is, of all the writers I’ve spoken to on these podcasts, the least experienced. He has only had two plays produced professionally. Both of them to massive critical acclaim. But in other ways he is far more experienced than all of us. Martello-White has made his name over the past decade as one of the most compe…
 
Anupama Chadrasekhar was born and raised in Chennai in India’s East Coat, in the heart of the Bay of Bengal. She started writing for theatre in the second half of the last decade when her early plays Closer Apart was produced in her hometown and her next, the self-directed Acid, was produced in Mumbai. She first came to British attention through he…
 
I’m not sure I remember the very first time I met Mike Bartlett. I know he was a participant in one of the Young Writers Groups that I ran at the Royal Court in the early years of the last decade. After a few weeks I became quietly aware of his wry humour and quiet but forensic and determined intelligence. I do remember one early encounter with his…
 
Abi Morgan is one of the most prolific and celebrated dramatists of her generation. While she has reached international acclaim for her startling television and film work she began her trade in the theatre and has, over the course of the past two decades, made plays of formal confidence, emotional incision and darting theatricality. There are few s…
 
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