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Join Teen Mom UK’s Mia Boardman and Chloé Patton for the parenting podcast, Nappy Days. Every episode, Mia has an honest chat with a famous mum or dad about some of the challenges they’ve faced and what life as a parent is like for them now. Mia and Chloe then have a debrief on the interview with an update on their own lives too. Subscribe now and listen on Global Player, MTV.co.uk and all of the podcast platforms.
 
Seven Questions is a monthly podcast by Jason White, formerly of the Point 2 Point podcast and currently a recurring panelist on the I've Been Diced podcast. The guests will discuss board gaming topics while also competing in a trivia contest on a related (sometimes tangentially) topic.
 
On November 28, 1979, an Air New Zealand jet took off from Auckland Airport on a sightseeing trip to Antarctica. There were 257 people on board. Hours later everyone was dead. Somehow, the plane had flown directly into the Erebus volcano. This was a disaster that shattered a country’s psyche. In the decades since, grief gave way to blame, anger and recrimination. Who was responsible for so many deaths? Was there a cover-up? How could a plane just fly into a mountain? To mark the 40th anniver ...
 
How to describe this book? In a word – savage. For those regular Librivox Le Queux mystery listeners, this book is a step in a different direction by the author. The book starts out like most Le Queux. Our hero, Richard Scarsmere, befriends an individual (Omar) at an English boarding school who turns out to be an African prince from a kingdom called Mo. Omar receives a visit from one of his mother’s trusted advisers. His mother, the Great White Queen, seeks him to return home immediately. Om ...
 
Two English professors. Nerds. Horror lovers. And we married each other. Now, every week, we bring new terrors to the table. What began as explorations of the literary analyses of horror movies, has expanded into research and conversation about all things horrifying. Dim the lights, spark up the candles, and drag out those Ouija boards. No rabbit hole is too deep. No basement is too dark.And nothing will stop us from bringing you new scares every week.And remember: there are two types of peo ...
 
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show series
 
Several transgender athletes around the world are vying to make history at the upcoming Tokyo Olympics. We speak with LGBTQ sportswriter Cyd Zeigler and professional runner Nikki Hiltz, who recently announced they are transgender and nonbinary. And, ready to start hosting again? Chef Kathy Gunst has recipes for entertaining as many states lift pand…
 
After record voter turnout in 2020, Republican-controlled legislatures are passing restrictive voting rights laws, emboldened by false claims of voter fraud. The CEO of the New Georgia Project explains what these attacks mean for the American freedom to vote. And, the Department of Education says transgender students are protected from discriminati…
 
Florida Keys officials are working on a unique experiment: hatching thousands of genetically modified mosquitos and releasing them. Andrea Leal of the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District explains. And, Connie Biewald discusses her new novel, "Truth Like Oil," about a Black teen struggling with his own demons as his prospects of walking across th…
 
When Ursula Burns was named the CEO of Xerox in 2009, she became the first Black woman to head a Fortune 500 company. Her new memoir takes readers through her nearly 30-year journey from intern to CEO. And, Celebrity Cruises is requiring passengers 16 and older to show COVID-19 vaccination proof, but that goes against the law in its home state of F…
 
Author Clint Smith explains why Juneteenth isn't taught in schools and how that contributes to distorted views of slavery. And, valedictorian Verda Tetteh won a $40,000 scholarship at her high school graduation. Then, she headed back to the podium and announced that she would prefer that a student in greater need receive the scholarship instead. Te…
 
A fragment of the original Pride flag has been discovered and is now on display in San Francisco. We talk with Charles Beal, a friend of the flag's creator. And, 10 Black cultural centers and museums are releasing their collaborative movie "Juneteenth." Asia Harris and Tiffany Cooper, who worked on the film, join us.…
 
Patrick Bryant's radio show "Subject to Change" covers the same song for two hours. He joins us to discuss his latest pick "I Just Don't Know What to Do With Myself." And, state legislatures from multiple states have recently taken up bills that address sex education in schools. Oregon OB-GYN Dr. Jennifer Lincoln and sex educator KC Slack weigh in.…
 
A new treatment could be a game changer for some patients with tumor-based cancers. It's a simple blood test that shows recurrence of cancer months before it can appear on MRIs, CT scans and X-rays. We speak to a doctor and a patient using the test. And, we speak with the executive director of the National Association of School Resource Officers, a…
 
NPR TV critic Eric Deggans discusses the end of an era after "Keeping Up With The Kardashians" aired its final episode. And, NYC's Drama Book Shop shut down prior to the pandemic and was then saved by Lin-Manuel Miranda and his often-collaborator Thomas Kail. NPR's Jeff Lunden reports on the store's long-awaited reopening.…
 
After World War II, veteran Charles Waterhouse made it his mission to honor his fellow Marines by painting their portraits. His daughter Jane Waterhouse joins us to discuss publishing his art in the book "Valor in Action." And, the Boyce Thompson Arboretum, Arizona's oldest and largest botanical garden, was saved Monday from the Telegraph Fire afte…
 
When gyms closed last year, millions of Americans went online to keep fit during the pandemic. Marc Santa Maria, national director of group fitness for Crunch Fitness, discusses the future of the fitness industry. And, the company behind the Keystone XL pipeline announced it's terminating the project after more than a decade of fighting. Larry Wrig…
 
There's excitement — and controversy — surrounding Biogen's new Alzheimer's drug. What are doctors saying? Dr. Jason Karlawish and Dr. Gayatri Devi discuss the drug's promise and peril. And, ProPublica revealed a trove of tax records showing the megarich pay next to nothing in income taxes. Robert McClelland of the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center…
 
"The Secret History of Home Economics" author Danielle Dreilinger discusses how home economics classes gave women career opportunities in science. And, very few people will be able to catch the annular solar eclipse on June 10. Sky & Telescope senior editor Kelly Beatty explains how to see it and what it'll look like.…
 
In 2012, then-Vice President Joe Biden became the highest-ranking Democrat to support marriage equality. Author Sasha Issenberg explains the evolution of Biden's position on LGBTQ rights. And, when Maryland psychotherapist Kerry Malawista noticed frontline health care workers struggling with the pandemic and deaths, she started a writing program to…
 
There's a lot of buzz around a newly developed technology that protects bees from some deadly pesticides. Researcher James Webb joins us. And, abandoned construction sites along the U.S.-Mexico border have left scars in the landscape of several natural areas. Host Peter O'Dowd traveled to the border to see what's going on.…
 
Mandolinist Chris Thile, out with a new solo album, joins us to talk about becoming more reflective as a result of the pandemic. And, for many, it's been tough to shake the grief that COVID-19 has caused. Here & Now listener Jamie Mayer and her daughter remember their dad and grandpa, who died from COVID-19, by singing his favorite song.…
 
New documentary "All Light, Everywhere" examines surveillance, police body cameras and the nature of how we see. Director Theo Anthony joins us. And, "A New View" art project in Camden, New Jersey, hopes to deal with the city's illegal dumping problem while involving the community in public art. WHYY's Elisabeth Perez-Luna reports.…
 
This year marks the 400th birthday of Rebecca Nurse, the oldest woman executed for witchcraft during the Salem Witch Trials. One of Nurse's descendants discusses how the story resonates today. And, Betsy McKay of the Wall Street Journal talks about the evolution of the theory that the coronavirus originated from a lab leak in Wuhan, China.…
 
"Madhouse At The End Of The Earth" tells the harrowing tale of the 19th century polar explorers aboard the Belgica. Author Julian Sancton joins us. And Malala Yousafzai recently graced the cover of British Vogue — but received backlash in Pakistan for her comments on marriage. NPR's Diaa Hadid explains the controversy.…
 
Rev. William Barber has long been calling for a Third Reconstruction, a restructuring of U.S. policies to root out racism, poverty and other ills. Barber explains why he thinks now is the right time to push the vision forward. And, KCUR's Mackenzie Martin looks at how Henry Perry, the so-called "Barbeque King," built an American institution in Kans…
 
A group of over 100 hospital workers in Texas is refusing to get the COVID-19 vaccine. They are suing their employer, Houston Methodist, for its compulsory vaccination policy as a violation of medical ethics standards. And, sportscaster and NBA veteran Len Elmore discusses aggressive fan behavior during the NBA playoffs.…
 
"Critical Role" — a show based on the tabletop roleplaying game Dungeons & Dragons — wraps up its narrative arc Thursday. We revisit a conversation with two cast members about the game's enduring appeal. And, NPR's Aisha Harris and KPCC's John Horn join us to talk about this year's movies and if anyone's going to the theatres these days.…
 
The music of the Jacksons is resurfacing after the re-release of their albums. But how does Michael Jackson's complicated legacy impact the family's music? Writer Jody Rosen joins us. And, strawberry season begins in many parts of the U.S. this month. Resident chef Kathy Gunst has three strawberry recipes to share.…
 
Salt marshes are among the most productive ecosystems in the world. In Bradenton, Florida, volunteers are working to bolder this coastal habitat. WUSF's Cathy Carter takes us there. And, new data shows the pandemic spurred a migration of tech jobs away from Silicon Valley and into some midsize metros. Bloomberg's Jonathan Levin explains this new tr…
 
When country singer John Prine was hospitalized last year with COVID-19, Sturgill Simpson felt he'd never see his friend again. Simpson joins us to discuss Prine and other country legends. And, vampire bats could soon arrive in the U.S. from Mexico due to climate change. WUSF's Jessica Meszaros reports.…
 
Tennis player Naomi Osaka said Monday she's withdrawing from the French Open after being fined $15,000 for refusing to speak to the media to protect her mental health. ESPN's Pam Shriver joins us. And, experts predict the 2021 Atlantic Hurricane Season will have an above-normal number of named storms. Jeff Huffman of Florida Public Radio Emergency …
 
A Washington law firm contacted Andrew Bacevich, asking his family to join a lawsuit against Iran connected to his son who died in the Iraq War. He denied, but wondered: who's responsible for the death of my son? He joins us to discuss. And, Jessica Parkison, co-owner of the restaurant Salt, in Lakewood, Ohio details how her business is faring.…
 
A century ago, the all-Black community of Greenwood in Tulsa, Oklahoma, was attacked by a white mob. We excerpt an NPR Code Switch episode that looks at Greenwood 100 years later. And, as more pandemic restrictions lift, we hear from Here & Now listeners on what they're looking forward to doing as fully vaccinated people.…
 
Gymnast Simone Biles received a 6.6 provisional score for landing the Yuchenko Double Pike. Journalist Dvora Meyers explains the controversy surrounding the score. And, the term "geriatric millennial" is raising the hackles of some folks. Al Jazeera's Femi Oke explains.NPR による
 
An estimated 37 million Americans will travel this weekend, a 60% jump from last year. Dr. Leana Wen weighs in on what to know for this upcoming holiday. And, Texas state Rep. Joe Moody, a Democrat, discusses the permitless gun carry bill that is to become law soon in his state and his opposition to it.…
 
The future of the oil and gas industry shifted dramatically this week when an activist hedge fund won against ExxonMobil. MSNBC's Ali Velshi explains what this means for the industry's future. And, we hear how residents are coping after the mass shooting in San Jose. Adhiti Bandlamudi lives a few blocks away from where the shooting occurred and joi…
 
A ProPublica investigation finds the online dating industry has done little to protect users from sexual assault. One survivor talks about her experience dealing with the company Bumble. And, the Biden administration wants to reverse a long-term decline in manufacturing jobs. But despite a post-pandemic surge in demand, hundreds of thousands of pos…
 
Half the country's adults are now fully vaccinated for COVID-19 and nearly two-thirds have a single dose. But does that mean the pandemic is over? Expert Laurie Garrett weighs in. And, although Democrats want to get rid of the filibuster, Joe Manchin stands in their way. Vox's Andrew Prokop, who recently profiled Manchin, joins us.…
 
Byron Allen is on a mission to tackle racism in the media industry — one lawsuit at a time. He joins us to discuss his push for economic inclusion. And, after spending 17 years sucking on tree roots underground, the largest brood of cicadas in the U.S. is out and about. Entomologist Mike Raupp takes us on a cicada safari.…
 
A super moon and a lunar eclipse are coinciding overnight, turning the sky deep red. Sky & Telescope's Kelly Beatty explains where and when the moon will be visible. And, a song-writing program called Girls Write Nashville helped some teens channel their emotions into songs during challenging times. Paige Pfleger of WPLN reports.…
 
Washington has enacted a course for police recruits to learn about the history of policing and race. Daudi Abe, a professor who helped create the curriculum, explains. And, despite staggering recent death counts, thousands of migrants continue to flee Africa by crossing the waters that lead to Europe. The head of one vessel mission discusses what s…
 
In collaboration with NPR's Life Kit, we speak with psychotherapist April Preston about the impact of racial trauma on people of color and how to cope with it. And, what's is it like to raise a child silenced by cerebral palsy? Steven Gardner details that journey in "Jabberwocky," a new memoir about his son Graham.…
 
Spring snowmelt could relieve the extreme drought in the West — but it's falling short in some places, Colorado Public Radio's Michael Elizabeth Sakas reports. And, to help the cast of "The Underground Railroad" process the trauma of slavery, director Barry Jenkins took the novel step of hiring an on-set mental health counselor. Therapist Kim Whyte…
 
The new book "Eartha & Kitt: A Daughter's Love Story in Black and White" chronicles Kitt Shapiro's relationship with her mother, legendary singer Eartha Kitt. Shapiro joins us. And, Demi Lovato came out as nonbinary and changed their pronouns to they/them. Al Jazeera's Femi Oke talks about the significance of Lovato's revelation and the conversatio…
 
John Hiatt and Jerry Douglas have been making music for decades but they've never made a record together — unitl now. "Leftover Feelings" is out on Friday. And, TV networks just announced a slate of new programming for the fall. But will it be enough to attract the audiences they desperately need? NPR TV critic Eric Deggans weighs in.…
 
Chef Kathy Gunst shares tips for picking and cooking artichokes. She has recipes using fresh artichokes as well as the jarred or canned variety. And, Kyra Peralte had an idea during the pandemic: Start a traveling diary that makes its way around the world to women who can add an entry. She joins us to talk about the project.…
 
Four teenage poets are in the running for the title of this year's National Youth Poet Laureate. We speak with the finalists. And, after former President Trump alleged "election crime" in Arizona, Maricopa County Recorder Stephen Richer could be silent no more. Richer, a Republican who oversees voter registration, joins us.…
 
Over the past five years, U.S. diplomats, soldiers and CIA officers working overseas reported sudden neurological illnesses. Now, there are reports of White House officials being affected on U.S. soil. Edward Wong of the New York Times joins us. And, Jeff Kollath, executive director of the Stax Museum, discusses a rare collection of classic 'sweet …
 
May marks the 51st anniversary of the Kent State shootings — the day four students were killed at an anti-Vietnam War protest. Jeffrey Miller is known for the iconic photo from the incident. His brother, Russ Miller, joins us. And, the European Union signals it will include the U.S. on its non-essential travel list, opening its borders for American…
 
A new analysis finds just 20 companies are responsible for more than half of the world's throwaway single-use plastic waste. Two U.S.-based companies top the list. Roben Farzad, host of public radio's "Full Disclosure," explains. And, Ervin Staub, a psychology expert, talks to us about his police intervention training and research.…
 
Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney of The Black Keys talk about their new album "Delta Kream," which has covers of many Mississippi blues classics. And, design label ADIFF is tackling fashion's waste problem through its new book, "Open Source Fashion Cookbook." The book offers recipes and tips for DIY sustainable designs. ADIFF's co-founders join us.…
 
In "The Whiteness of Wealth," tax law professor and author Dorothy Brown argues that the U.S. systems for generating wealth inherently favor white Americans while penalizing Black Americans. We speak with her. And, marine biologist Huw Griffiths takes amazingly clear and close-up photos of birds. He explains how he does it.…
 
In his new book, "Freedom," Sebastian Junger tries to unpack the tension between freedom and community. He joins us. And, the latest conflict in Israel and the Gaza Strip has entered the second week of fighting. Khaled Elgindy of the Middle East Institute explains what's driving the conflict.NPR による
 
Aarti Shahani, host of the WBEZ podcast "Art of Power," talks about her interview with former President Barack Obama about the role of toxic masculinity in our society. And, Amazon's "The Underground Railroad" depicts beautiful images of Black people, but it also features explicit depictions of violence against them. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans tell…
 
The CDC says vaccinated Americans no longer have to wear masks. While the move signals a return to normal, it also stands in contrast to guidelines from states and local governments. And, land-grant universities broadened access to higher education in the U.S. at the expense of Native Americans. We speak with a reporter about "land-grab universitie…
 
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