North Dakota 公開
[search 0]
もっと

Download the App!

show episodes
 
Hosted by Chuck Lura, a biology professor at Dakota College in Bottineau. Chuck has a broad knowledge of “Natural North Dakota” and loves sharing that knowledge with others. Since 2005, he has written a weekly column, “Naturalist at Large,” for the Lake Metigoshe Mirror. His columns also appear under “The Naturalist” in several other weekly newspapers across North Dakota. Natural North Dakota is supported by NDSU Central Grasslands Research Extension Center and Dakota College at Bottineau, a ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
We have had a few days this winter when the sundogs have been quite prominent in the morning and evening sky. Although not rainbows, the basic principles are similar. The scientific name for sundogs is parihelia (singular parahelion). They often appear during cold winter days when ice crystals are abundant in the atmosphere and the sun is low in th…
 
A quiet calm seems to come over the landscape during the winter months. But there is more going on than one might think. Many of the birds from summer have gone south, of course, but several species are permanent residents. And mammals remain as well, but their activities may be rather inconspicuous, particularly those living under the snow and ice…
 
The winter landscape can look rather empty and bleak this time of year. And although the animals can seek shelter in burrows, under snow, or other protected places, the trees have no choice but to stay put and tough it out. But unlike most trees native to North Dakota that shed their leaves in the fall the evergreens such as pine, spruce, and junip…
 
Much of North Dakota is pothole country, and the Missouri Coteau, that band of hills that borders the Missouri River on the east is prime duck country. Tucked away in Kidder County a bit south and east of Dawson, North Dakota is Slade National Wildlife Refuge which provides important habitat for ducks and other wildlife.…
 
It is time to look skyward at night again. Some of you may have been noticing some meteors recently. The Leonids Meteor Shower began on November 6th and will run through the 30th. The shower will peak on the night of November 17th and early morning hours of the 18th with perhaps 15 meteors or so per hour. A nearly full moon, however, will make only…
 
“The Father of Waters.” When most people hear or read that phrase, they more than likely think of the Mississippi River. But why not the Missouri River? I have been thinking about that after reading John Madson’s Up on the River: An Upper Mississippi Chronicle. In the book, Madson wonders why it was the Mississippi River that was designated to cont…
 
Are you familiar with mima mounds? They are low circular mounds of soil on some landscapes in Oregon, Idaho, and other areas of the United States, mostly west of the Mississippi River. Mima mounds, or something very similar, have been observed in Rolette County. They are mentioned as “freckled areas” in North Dakota Geological Survey Bulletin 58, G…
 
Over the years I have occasionally heard that clucking sound in the Turtle Mountain forest. It sounds as if it were the call of a bird. I had heard the call of a cuckoo many years ago and thought maybe that was what I was hearing. But I could never seem to spot the bird, and when I listened to recordings of both the black-billed and yellow-billed c…
 
You may want to check for clear skies the evenings of October 6-10. That is because the Draconids Meteor Shower will be putting on its annual show. It is not one of the better meteor showers, but if we have comfortable temperatures and the skies are clear, it is worth checking out.Chuck Lura による
 
Fall is officially here. Labor Day is in the rearview mirror, school has started, and of course the equinox occurred on the 22nd. With the coming of fall, many among us wait in eager anticipation for the leaves to turn color. Every year about this time we get anxious to see the trees put on their annual color display. The fall colors are delightful…
 
I recently read a study about the Dakota skipper. The Dakota skipper is a small butterfly, with a wingspan of around one inch. Coloration is variable between the sexes with the upper wing surface of males a towny-orange to brown while females are a darker brown and spotted. The underside of males is dusty yellow-orange and females gray-brown with s…
 
Have you ever heard of milk sickness? It is caused by consuming contaminated milk containing a toxin from the white snakeroot plant (Ageratina altissima). I had not heard of the sickness or the plant until recently, assumedly because the sickness is rare to nonexistent, and the plant uncommon or rare and not widely distributed in North Dakota.…
 
I have heard a few complaints on all the tree sap that has dripped on cars this summer. My car is usually parked under the canopy of some ash, aspen, and oak. Little drops of that stuff are all over the car, and it has not been easy to clean it off the windshield! But it is probably not sap!Chuck Lura による
 
I recently noticed some Impatiens growing amongst some cattails in Turtle Mountain. It is always a treat to see this interesting plant, also known as jewelweed, or touch-me-not.Two species of touch-me-nots are native to North Dakota. The more common and widely distributed species is the spotted touch-me-not (Impatiens capensis). It can be found rou…
 
Loading …

クイックリファレンスガイド

Google login Twitter login Classic login