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Keith is an author, international speaker, and founder of Biblical Foundations Academy International. He has been involved in a wide variety of ministries, including being a Methodist pastor, a professional sports team chaplain, a television and radio host, and a tour leader in Israel. Keith holds an undergraduate degree from the University of Minnesota, a master’s degree from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Illinois, and has completed an intensive Hebrew language course at Hebrew Uni ...
 
Groundwork is a half-hour conversation that digs deeply into Scripture, the foundation for our lives. Each week, pastors Dave Bast (president of Words of Hope) and Scott Hoezee (director of CEP at Calvin Seminary) cultivate our understanding of God's Word by unpacking the richness of the Bible and applying it with insight to today's world.
 
We welcome you to the Biblical Foundations Bible Study. A Houston Bible Study taught by Chris Martin over the course of multi-week sessions, this Bible Study seeks to advance the Kingdom of God through both fellowship and demonstrating the importance of biblical literacy. "...If the foundations are destroyed, What can the righteous do?” Psalm 11:3 NASB
 
Join Pastor Ken Birks as he shares timely truths from God's Word from His Perspecives Class. The notes to these classes can be obtained from the following website: http://kenbirks.com/bible-foundations. You can also find a whole library of messages at www.kenbirks.com.I invite you to browse the website for sermon outlines, bible studies and an array of Bible Tools located at www.kenbirks.com.If you have any questions, please contact me at ken@straitarrow.net.God Bless You!
 
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This week’s Prophet reading—traditionally called the Haftorah—is Zechariah 2:14–4:7. It accompanies the Torah portion Beha’alotcha (Numbers 8:1–12:16). This Haftorah speaks of a time when God will again dwell among His people in Jerusalem. The passage includes a reference to the function of an “adversary” and also predicts the arrival of one called…
 
When we read the story of Jesus meeting the disciples on the shore in John 21, we learn that even after seeing him twice, Jesus’ own disciples still don’t recognize him. We too have moments like that today, when we don’t recognize God or what he’s up to in his world. The disciples’ story helps us recognize that Jesus is there in the ordinary and th…
 
The faith of the first Christians was grounded in their unshakable belief in the resurrection of Jesus Christ. But even the disciples experienced fear and doubt as they began to hear stories of people who claimed to have seen the resurrected Jesus. As we study the first interactions between Jesus and his disciples, and particularly the disciple we’…
 
In Hebrew Gospel Pearls #26, Another Jesus?, Nehemia and Keith discuss how the standard Greek version differs from the Hebrew, whom the Hebrew Yeshua declared that he would destroy, and why a pious scribe might tamper with the text. Support the showKeith Johnson: BFA International | Nehemia Gordon | Hebrew Bible Study による
 
This week’s Prophet reading—traditionally called the Haftorah—is Hosea 2:1–22 (1:10–2:20 in English). It accompanies the Torah portion Bemidbar (Numbers 1:1–4:20). The reading for this week is a blend of warnings of severe punishment and profound promises of the ultimate restoration of a beautiful and harmonious relationship between God and His peo…
 
On the evening of the very first Easter, two of Jesus’ followers listened as their companion on the road to Emmaus explained various Old Testament scriptures to them. Unknowingly, they were walking this road with their Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. As they listened that evening, their understanding of Scripture grew and so did their faith. In time…
 
This week’s Prophet reading—traditionally called the Haftorah—is Jeremiah 16:19–17:14. It accompanies the Torah portion Bechukotai (Leviticus 26:3–27:34). This week’s reading speaks of the futility of false gods, religious lies, and trusting in man, followed by God’s promise to teach people about Himself. God speaks of searching men’s hearts and de…
 
Experiencing Jesus is one way we can cultivate our faith. In the gospels, we read about Jesus’ encounters with his female followers, and later his disciples, on that very first Easter day. Their experience of him deepened and grew their faith, and it can do the same for us. As we study their experience of Jesus that day, together we come to see and…
 
This week’s Prophet reading—traditionally called the Haftorah—is Jeremiah 32:6–27. It accompanies the Torah portion Behar (Leviticus 25:1–26:2). The context of this passage is the impending destruction of Jerusalem by the Babylonians. It recounts God’s instruction to Jeremiah to purchase a parcel of land, an act that presages the eventual restorati…
 
Good Friday and Easter mark the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, the climax of the Christian church year. There’s no doubt these are the events at the heart of our Christian Faith. During Holy Week, Christians around the world pause to remember and celebrate the great gift of salvation that we receive through Christ’s sacrifice. The Apostle …
 
This week’s Prophet reading—traditionally called the Haftorah—is Ezekiel 44:15–31. It accompanies the Torah portion Emor (Leviticus 21:1–24:23). This Haftorah looks forward to the restoration of a faithful priesthood, whose principal responsibility can be summed up as teaching the people “what is sacred and what is profane, and what is clean and un…
 
The four gospel accounts of Jesus’ life and ministry vary in their selections of stories and in their details. Each gospel writer has a different audience in mind and a different goal, both of which influence what and how they retell Christ’s life. However, the story of Jesus’ crucifixion is so important to the message of salvation that we find an …
 
In Hebrew Gospel Pearls #25, Preserving “the Good Jesus”, Nehemia and Keith detail the untold backstory that ultimately led to their study of Hebrew Matthew, share the amazing account of how copper preserved a sunken ship for five centuries and give a 101 course on the text of the Hebrew Bible. Support the show (https://bfainternational.com/give/)…
 
This week’s Prophet reading—traditionally called the Haftorah—combines two passages and covers Ezekiel 22: 1–19 and Amos 9:7–15. These Prophet readings accompany the Torah portions Achrei Mot (Leviticus 16:1–18:30) and Kedoshim (Leviticus 19:1–20:27). In the first of these two passages Ezekiel is commissioned to sit as a judge over the city of Jeru…
 
This week’s Prophet reading—traditionally called the Haftorah—combines two passages and covers Ezekiel 22: 1–19 and Amos 9:7–15. These Prophet readings accompany the Torah portions Achrei Mot (Leviticus 16:1–18:30) and Kedoshim (Leviticus 19:1–20:27). In the first of these two passages Ezekiel is commissioned to sit as a judge over the city of Jeru…
 
When something seems too good to be true, we might find ourselves raising an eyebrow, reading the fine print, and asking “what’s the catch?” But when it comes to salvation, there really is no catch and beyond having faith there is nothing else we need to do. When Christ died on the cross, he paid our debts in full. There is absolutely nothing we ca…
 
This week’s Prophet reading—traditionally called the Haftorah—combines two passages and covers 2 Kings 4:42–5:19 and 7:3–20. These Prophet readings accompany the Torah portions Tazria (Leviticus 12:1–13:59) and Metzora (Leviticus 14:1–15:33). These Haftorahs relate the history of two miracles. The first caused the Syrian general Naaman to declare: …
 
his week’s Prophet reading—traditionally called the Haftorah—combines two passages and covers 2 Kings 4:42–5:19 and 7:3–20. These Prophet readings accompany the Torah portions Tazria (Leviticus 12:1–13:59) and Metzora (Leviticus 14:1–15:33). These Haftorahs relate the history of two miracles. The first caused the Syrian general Naaman to declare: “…
 
The cross is a paradox. By human standards, it shouldn’t make sense, it shouldn’t work, and yet, it does. In fact, it’s the greatest paradox—life from death, pardon from penalty, and justification from judgment. In the Roman empire, the cross brought death in a brutal, humiliating way. But instead of shame and defeat, believers of Jesus Christ find…
 
This week’s Prophet reading—traditionally called the Haftorah—is 2 Samuel 6:1–7:17. It accompanies the Torah portion Shemini (Leviticus 9:1–11:47). This passage relates the story of moving the Ark of God to the City of David. David wanted to build a temple or house for God, but was not permitted to do so. In fact, God promised that He would be the …
 
Shame is a very raw, acute, and distressing feeling. We experience shame when we’re humiliated by our own sinful behavior. Jesus had no sin, yet he too knew shame— the shame of the cross. It’s another aspect of the cross that will help us comprehend the fullness of Jesus’ sacrifice. Together we’ll discuss the relationship between sin and shame in S…
 
This week’s Prophet reading—traditionally called the Haftorah—is Jeremiah 7:21–8:3 and 9:22–23. It accompanies the Torah portion Tzav (Leviticus 6:1–8:36). This Haftorah contains Jeremiah’s scathing rebuke of the nation of Judah for its desecration of the temple called by God’s name. He also announces the coming punishment. The reading concludes wi…
 
Crucifixion was a particularly gruesome way to die, but when Jesus died on the cross it wasn’t just gruesome, it was cursed. Seeking to understand the cursed nature of the cross leads us to make connections between the Old Testament and the New Testament, between our deep-seated guilt and the extreme cost Jesus paid to set us free. We were rightly …
 
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