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The Cold War, Prohibition, the Gold Rush, the Space Race. Every part of your life - the words you speak, the ideas you share - can be traced to our history, but how well do you really know the stories that made America? We’ll take you to the events, the times and the people that shaped our nation. And we’ll show you how our history affected them, their families and affects you today. Hosted by Lindsay Graham (not the Senator). From Wondery, the network behind American Scandal, Tides of Histo ...
 
Frightening stories that folklore inspires. Join host Christopher Feinstein on a journey to discover the history behind American Folklore and the campfire stories they inspire. Sometimes gory. Sometimes touching. Always original. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.
 
The American History Podcast presents the history of the United States in an engaging, scholarly and entertaining way. Each season we take a topic in American history and dive deep to discover the roots of the issue, and provide our listeners with a lot of history they don't know. Follow the American History Podcast on Twitter: @americanhiscast. Feel free to email me with questions and comments: shawn@theamericanhistorypodcast.com
 
Join The Gist of Freedom weekly live online discussion is a celebration of the African American experience—honoring all the people, past and present, black and white—who have determined to preserve history in literature, craftsmanship and artifact.
 
War has played a key role in the history of the United States from the nation’s founding right down to the present. Wars made the U. S. independent, kept it together, increased its size, and established it as a global superpower. Understanding America’s wars is essential for understanding American history. In the Key Battles of American History, host James Early discusses American history through the lens of the most important battles of America’s wars. James is an Adjunct Professor of Histo ...
 
A weekly (term-time) podcast featuring brief interviews with the presenters at the Cambridge American History Seminar. We talk about presenters' current research and paper, their broader academic interests as well as a few more general questions. If you have any feedback, suggestions or questions, contact us via Twitter @camericanist or via email ltd27@cam.ac.uk . Thanks for listening!
 
The Journal of American History Podcast features interviews with our authors and conversations with authors whose books on American history have won awards. Episodes are in MP3 format and will be released in the month preceding each Journal of American History (February, May, August and November). Published quarterly by the Organization of American Historians, the Journal of American History is the leading scholarly publication in the field of U.S. history and is well known as the major reso ...
 
The JuntoCast is a monthly podcast about early American history. Each episode features a roundtable discussion by academic historians, Ken Owen, Michael Hattem, Roy Rogers, and guest panelists, exploring a single aspect of early American history in depth. The JuntoCast brings the current knowledge of academic historians to a broad audience in an informal, conversational format that is intellectually engaging, educational, and entertaining.
 
The purpose of this book "is to tell in simple fashion the story of some Americans who showed that they knew how to live and how to die; who proved their truth by their endeavor; and who joined to the stern and manly qualities which are essential to the well-being of a masterful race the virtues of gentleness, of patriotism, and of lofty adherence to an ideal." (from the Introduction)
 
American history is more than a collection of interesting stories, so why is it most often presented as such? It matters why things happened in the order they did. Join social historian Dr. Heath Mitton as he unpacks the story of the American Republic with special attention to how social and economic factors drove the politics of ideas, from the American Revolution through the presidency of Barack Obama. These episodes originally aired as a regular segment on 610 KVNU's For The People radio ...
 
The Latin American History Podcast aims to tell the story of Spanish and Portuguese America from its very beginnings up until the present day. Latin America’s history is home to some of the most exciting and unbelievable stories of adventure and exploration, and this podcast will tell these stories in all their glory. It will examine colonial society, slavery, and what life was like for the region’s inhabitants during this period. We will look at what caused the wars of independence, how the ...
 
How have writers, illustrators, film makers, and musicians shaped the American experience? In this podcast series historian Dr. Darren R. Reid explores American history through the lens of the artist. From classic comics books to music and film, this podcast examines how art and artistry has reflected and informed the American experience. Featured iTunes podcast (January and February 2014), #1 episodes in Education and Higher Education. Current series, "Comic Book Studies" explores the histo ...
 
Noble Sissle, who lived from 1889 to 1975, participated in and witnessed some of America's great moments in history associated with culture and racial equality. Known throughout history as a music lyricist and orchestra leader, Sissle was an ambassador of goodwill for America from World War I with the renowned Harlem Hellfighters' Regimental Band to the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s to entertaining millions of military service persons with the USO in World War II to playing for presidents, ...
 
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In 1813, the American ground forces in the north launched a second series of attacks against British forces in Canada. This time the Americans were more experienced, better equipped, and were led by much better officers. In this episode, Steve and James discuss the second American offensive against Canada. Join us to see if it succeeded.…
 
The August 8th episode of Philip Marlowe was called “Robin and The Hood.” Jeff Chandler guest-starred playing a dual role.Born Ira Grossel in Brooklyn, New York on December 15th, 1918, he acted in high school with classmate Susan Hayward. Chandler went to the Feagin School of Dramatic Art and had a stint with a theater troupe. He served in the Paci…
 
Ven. Nelson Baker was a Catholic priest whose radical trust in Our Lady of Victory helped him serve orphans, mothers, and children for decades. Tom and Noëlle Crowe tell us about the turning points in his life that led to the City of Charity in Lackawanna, New York. The post Venerable Nelson Baker appeared first on StarQuest Media.…
 
Welcome to Season 2, Episode 40! We’re fans of professional sumo in Japan. It’s fun to watch and takes a great amount of skill. There’s actually a relatively rich history of Asian American and Pacific Islanders in professional sumo. Although there aren’t any impactful AAPI in the sport now, there have been some amazing wrestlers in the past includi…
 
Today I am going to discuss some of the legends that the lands around Appalachia are bursting with. We will also meet Eric and Jen, a couple who's gave up everything to follow a dream, only to end up in a nightmare Written and Performed by Christopher Feinstein Twitter- @Haunted_A_H Instagram- haunted_american_history email- hauntedamericanhistory@…
 
The Civil War began as an effort to hold the country together. Few Northern soldiers marched into battle to end slavery. But tens of thousands of enslaved men, women, and children took matters into their own hands, using the chaos of the war to free themselves from bondage. Their action forced a gradual shift in Union war policy. After a bloody, ha…
 
Emerging civil war with Chris Mackowski & Sarah Kay Bierle in this latest Podcast, I was joined by Emerging Civil War's Co-founder and editor in chief Chris Mackowski and Managing Editor Sarah kay Bierle to Discuss the history behind Emerging Civil War. Please also find all relevant links in the description below including links to all-American Civ…
 
Today we move the narrative forward and find the U.S. Navy determined to hit the Japanese in the south Pacific, hopefully to stop their advance in the region. Failure to do so could mean the Japanese will threaten the shipping lanes to Australia. This battle is historic in that the two fleets, for the first time, will not actually see each other. S…
 
Before there was Sesame Street or Sesame Place, there was Coney Island, “Granville’s Island”! Granville T. Woods Known as the “Black Thomas Edison” was an engineer who invented and patented the electric roller coaster, which he introduced in the summer of 1909 at Coney Island. He developed dozens of innovative mass transit improvements. ****** Join…
 
On July 8th, 1947, NBC broadcast an adaptation of “The King In Yellow,” originally published in Dime Detective Magazine in March of 1938. It’s a seedy saga of a hot trumpet player whose boorish behavior gets him killed.Among those featured in this episode were Gerald Mohr, Gloria Blondell, Bill Johnstone, Willard Waterman, and Howard McNear. By the…
 
In this special bonus episode, James is joined by special guest Jerry Landry, host of the Presidencies of the United States Podcast. Jerry and James discuss the early career and life of William Henry Harrison, who enjoyed a long military and political career and who led the US Army to victory at the battles of Tippecanoe and the Thames. Jerry has l…
 
The June 17th, 1947 edition of Billboard Magazine reviewed the first Marlowe episode. It was noted that similar shows were expected to pull a rating of 7.5. The magazine stated that “Milton Geiger's adaptation adhered to Red Wind's language almost to the letter, and captured most of the colorful, almost poetic flavor.“On the debit side was the enor…
 
The War of 1812 was not fought merely on land, but also on the sea. To anyone at the time, it would have seemed that the tiny American navy, with only 16 ships at the start of the war, would be crushed by the Royal Navy, which had over 500 ships in service. But what the Americans lacked in numbers, they made up for in seamanship and determination. …
 
The Adventures of Philip Marlowe debuted on NBC with “Red Wind” on June 17th, 1947. The 1938 short story is set on one of those evenings when the hot, dry Santa Ana wind gusts through Los Angeles, turning the mood sour.The program aired live at 10PM on the east coast, with a second broadcast done at 9PM for the west. The script was adapted by Milto…
 
The Story of Zach continues... "This thing of darkness, I acknowledge mine." - William Shakespeare - The Tempest Everyone remembers where they were the day they learned that monsters are real. Written and Performed by Christopher Feinstein https://www.patreon.com/hauntedamericanhistory Darkest Child by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmu…
 
Welcome to Season 2, Episode 39! We love reading… and finding an author who creates more diverse representational stories is always a treat. In this episode’s conversation, we welcome Oliver Chin who is not only an author of over 20 titles, but he’s also the founder of the publishing house Immedium which really does a great job in promoting diverse…
 
By the middle of 1947, nearly eleven million babies had been born in the U.S. since the end of World War II. Young parents were staying home with their children. Homes with radios jumped six percent, car radios twenty-nine percent. Over the next year, radio would have its largest audience in history. The four major networks added one-hundred forty-…
 
Van Heflin was born on December 13th, 1908 in Walters, Oklahoma. The son of a dentist, he began his acting career on Broadway in the late 1920s. Between 1928 and 1936 he appeared in. Mr. Moneypenny, The Bride of Torozko, The Night Remembers, Mid-West, and End of Summer.That year Heflin signed with RKO and made his film debut opposite Katherine Hepb…
 
Today we present the last of our "author interviews" for the year. William Taylor was a Marine who served in Vietnam for 13 months, earning 3 Purple Hearts and 2 Presidential Unit citations in the process. His book about the experience is a well written one which will take you into the thick of the action. It was a pleasure to interview Bill and re…
 
On April 19th, 1861, an angry mob of Confederate sympathizers in Baltimore tried to stop a regiment of Union soldiers rushing to protect the capitol. Soon, four soldiers and 12 locals lay dead, and dozens more were wounded. It was the first blood spilled in what would become the Civil War. Soon, Union and Confederate soldiers marched into their fir…
 
Soon after war was declared, U. S. President Madison and Secretary of War Eustis decided to launch a three-pronged assault on Canada. American forces would cross the Detroit, Niagara, and St. Lawrence Rivers and attack much smaller British and Canadian forces in three strategic locations. The plan seemed solid…but would it work? Join Steve and Jame…
 
Philip Marlowe, born in Santa Rosa, California, is six feet tall and weighs one-hundred ninety pounds. He has dark wavy hair. In Chandler’s first Marlowe novel, The Big Sleep, set in 1936, he’s thirty-three. Marlowe had two years of college and was an investigator for the LA District Attorney. He was fired for insubordination. His office is in the …
 
Why does a very old Catholic parish in Kentucky have the complete relics of two Roman martyrs? Tom and Noëlle Crowe tell the fascinating story of the relics of St. Bonosa and St. Magnus, an Italian Cistercian abbey, Pope St. Leo XIII, and St. Martin parish in Louisville. The post Roman Martyrs in a Kentucky Catholic Church appeared first on StarQue…
 
Welcome to Season 2, Episode 38! We love reading and learning, so it was a treat to get a chance to have a conversation with Daryl Joji Maeda, the Dean and Vice Provost of Undergraduate Education at the University of Colorado Boulder. His latest book is Like Water: A Cultural History of Bruce Lee. It was a fascinating, well-researched book that tak…
 
Join me as we visit the National Parks of the United States and meet Jarod Cole, A security guard whose search for a missing family uncovers something he would never dream possible. Written and Performed by Christopher Feinstein Music by Kevin Macleod Twitter- @Haunted_A_H Instagram- haunted_american_history email- hauntedamericanhistory@gmail.com …
 
La Jolla, California. 1947. We’re at 6005 Camino de la Costa at the home of Raymond Chandler. It’s been three years since the fifty-nine year-old wrote a full length novel. Instead he’s worked on two screen plays. Chandler co-adapted Double Indemnity with Billy Wilder, and penned The Blue Dahlia. Both earned him Academy Award nominations.Looking fo…
 
At the time of the War of 1812, the United States was deeply divided between Republicans, most of whom supported the war, and Federalists, who opposed the war. This division broke out into violence in the Baltimore Riots of the summer of 1812. In this mini-episode, Steve and James discuss the Baltimore Riots, the war aims of the British and the Ame…
 
Since it's been a while, I'm releasing this WWII episode a few days early. Today we get back to the main narrative and discuss events in spring 1942 which led up to the Battle of the Coral Sea. Enjoy! Dirt Road Discussions This is not an ordinary farm podcast! Intriguing stories hosted by the Idaho Farm Bureau. Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Sup…
 
In Breaking Walls episode 129 we honor the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Roswell incident by focusing on Radio and the mid-century flying saucer craze. ——————————Highlights:• World War II, Kenneth Arnold, Roswell, and “Project Saucer”• The Chicago Roundtable Attempts to Answer What Life on Other Planets Would Look Like• Sightings in The Spring o…
 
By 1955 radio’s days as America’s chief entertainment medium were over. However, while radio drama was dying out, UFO sightings were becoming more prevalent. Some were so outlandish they were hard to believe. Others were chillingly real. For example: On September 19th, 1961 Betty and Barney Hill had a widely known abduction experience. The Hills sa…
 
Over the first decades of the 19th century, Americans fought over whether slavery should be allowed to expand into newly settled western territories. The debate grew so fierce that it led to a bloody attack right on the floor of the U.S. Senate. Many believed that the fight over slavery had made the bonds of union more brittle than ever. Then, in 1…
 
The 1783 Treaty of Paris formally ended the American War for Independence, but it left many issues between the United States and Great Britain unresolved. In addition, Britain’s war with Napoleon and his allies motivated the British Navy to increasingly interfere with American shipping and even to impress American sailors into the British Navy. Thi…
 
Roy Rogers was born on November 5th, 1911 in Cincinnati, Ohio. He spent much of the early 1930s performing with groups like Uncle Tom Murray’s Hollywood Hillbillies, The Texas Outlaws, and The Rocky Mountaineers. In mid-decade he joined up with Bob Nolan to form the Sons of the Pioneers. By 1935, they were appearing in bit parts for Republic Pictur…
 
Welcome to Season 2, Episode 37! History books and curriculum are missing a lot of information. There are a plethora of moments that are ignored or not talked about in true depth. Even worse are the times throughout our history that the majority has worked to erase the history, culture, and very existence of groups like Asian Pacific Islanders. Tod…
 
Ralph Story was born in Kalamazoo, Michigan on August 19th, 1920. He served as a US Army Fighter Pilot during World War II and started a career in broadcasting after the war. His big break came in 1948 when he was hired to host and direct an early morning show on KNX in Los Angeles. Story's casual style and witty observations about life in LA won h…
 
We will examine the three aspects that we will use to define slavery. Then we will look at how the spectrum of periphery slavery vs centralized slavery best explains the amount of exploitation we see with slavery at different times and places.Jacob Edwards-King による
 
In October of 1952 You Bet Your Life was in the middle of its sixth season on the air and third over NBC. That month’s rating was 8.8, down significantly from its peak, but still good enough for fifth overall. The October 15th’s secret word was “water,” and the male member of the middle couple had a very unusual hobby.…
 
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