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American Shadows is a bi-weekly podcast from iHeartRadio and Aaron Mahnke’s Grim & Mild. The show focuses on the darker stories from American history: the people, places, and things that are hidden and forgotten in the shadows. From better-known tales like the conspiracy to steal Lincoln’s body, to less-known stories, like the rainmaker who flooded San Diego. Join host Lauren Vogelbaum as she spans two centuries of omitted lore from our country’s history books.
 
The Cold War, Prohibition, the Gold Rush, the Space Race. Every part of your life -the words you speak, the ideas you share- can be traced to our history, but how well do you really know the stories that made America? We’ll take you to the events, the times and the people that shaped our nation. And we’ll show you how our history affected them, their families and affects you today. Hosted by Lindsay Graham (not the Senator). From Wondery, the network behind Tides Of History, Fall Of Rome and ...
 
HTDS is a bi-weekly podcast, delivering a legit, seriously researched, hard-hitting survey of American history through entertaining stories. To keep up with History That Doesn’t Suck news, check us out on Facebook and Instagram: @Historythatdoesntsuck; on Twitter: @HTDSpod; or online at htdspodcast.com. Support the podcast at patreon.com/historythatdoesntsuck.
 
The American History Podcast presents the history of the United States in an engaging, scholarly and entertaining way. Each season we take a topic in American history and dive deep to discover the roots of the issue, and provide our listeners with a lot of history they don't know. Follow the American History Podcast on Twitter: @americanhiscast. Feel free to email me with questions and comments: shawn@theamericanhistorypodcast.com
 
BHM365 is a weekly podcast series that explores the true account of African American History as American History. Hosted by author and marketplace entrepreneur Jo Anne Scaife, this podcast dives into the revolutionary research found in “Black History 365: An Inclusive Account of American History” a seminal work by Dr. Walter Milton, Jr. and Dr. Joel Freeman. Featuring weekly interviews with history makers and current influencers, special ‘round table’ talks and series, as well as community f ...
 
War has played a key role in the history of the United States from the nation’s founding right down to the present. Wars made the U. S. independent, kept it together, increased its size, and established it as a global superpower. Understanding America’s wars is essential for understanding American history. In the Key Battles of American History, host James Early discusses American history through the lens of the most important battles of America’s wars. James is an Adjunct Professor of Histo ...
 
Noble Sissle, who lived from 1889 to 1975, participated in and witnessed some of America's great moments in history associated with culture and racial equality. Known throughout history as a music lyricist and orchestra leader, Sissle was an ambassador of goodwill for America from World War I with the renowned Harlem Hellfighters' Regimental Band to the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s to entertaining millions of military service persons with the USO in World War II to playing for presidents, ...
 
The tides of American history lead through the streets of New York City — from the huddled masses on Ellis Island to the sleazy theaters of 1970s Times Square. The elevated railroad to the Underground Railroad. Hamilton to Hammerstein! Greg and Tom explore more than 400 years of action-packed stories, featuring both classic and forgotten figures who have shaped the world.
 
"Axelbank Reports History and Today: Conversations with America’s top non-fiction authors and why their books matter right now" approaches our past and present in a way that makes anyone want to listen. National-award winning TV news reporter Evan Axelbank interviews writers of history and current events to explore how America works and how it has been shaped by both the powerful and the powerless. In conversational and engaging fashion, listeners learn about the most important events, theme ...
 
On February 10th, 1796, Vice President John Adams wrote to his wife Abigail, lamenting the state of discourse in the country. The election was nearing—and becoming heated. Newspapers screamed, factions warred, and John Adams was dismayed with what he called “the wicked Game.” Americans in 2020 can relate. They still have to endure weeks of shouting, outrage, and the worst sort of political rancor as the country once again chooses its president. But it’s almost always been this way. And to pr ...
 
The JuntoCast is a monthly podcast about early American history. Each episode features a roundtable discussion by academic historians, Ken Owen, Michael Hattem, Roy Rogers, and guest panelists, exploring a single aspect of early American history in depth. The JuntoCast brings the current knowledge of academic historians to a broad audience in an informal, conversational format that is intellectually engaging, educational, and entertaining.
 
The Latin American History Podcast aims to tell the story of Spanish and Portuguese America from its very beginnings up until the present day. Latin America’s history is home to some of the most exciting and unbelievable stories of adventure and exploration, and this podcast will tell these stories in all their glory. It will examine colonial society, slavery, and what life was like for the region’s inhabitants during this period. We will look at what caused the wars of independence, how the ...
 
A weekly (term-time) podcast featuring brief interviews with the presenters at the Cambridge American History Seminar. We talk about presenters' current research and paper, their broader academic interests as well as a few more general questions. If you have any feedback, suggestions or questions, contact us via Twitter @camericanist or via email ltd27@cam.ac.uk . Thanks for listening!
 
The Huntington’s early American historical collections are important resources for the study of the Colonial and Revolutionary periods, the drafting of the Constitution, and the Civil War. Among the holdings are hundreds of autograph letters written by George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, as well as the manuscript of Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography. The Huntington can also claim the largest collection of autograph manuscripts of Abraham Lincoln west of Illinois. In conferences, seminars ...
 
The purpose of this book "is to tell in simple fashion the story of some Americans who showed that they knew how to live and how to die; who proved their truth by their endeavor; and who joined to the stern and manly qualities which are essential to the well-being of a masterful race the virtues of gentleness, of patriotism, and of lofty adherence to an ideal." (from the Introduction)
 
The Journal of American History Podcast features interviews with our authors and conversations with authors whose books on American history have won awards. Episodes are in MP3 format and will be released in the month preceding each Journal of American History (February, May, August and November). Published quarterly by the Organization of American Historians, the Journal of American History is the leading scholarly publication in the field of U.S. history and is well known as the major reso ...
 
The final section of Poems of American History covers The Reconstruction after the Civil War, the First Centennial, the continued expansion westward, the assasination of Garfield, The Spanish American War, and World War I. Poets in this volume include: John Greenleaf Whittier, Bret Harte, Oliver Wendell Holmes, William Cullen Bryant, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Wallace Rice, Vachel Lindsay, Joyce Kilmer, and many more. - Summary by Ed Humpal
 
American history is more than a collection of interesting stories, so why is it most often presented as such? It matters why things happened in the order they did. Join social historian Dr. Heath Mitton as he unpacks the story of the American Republic with special attention to how social and economic factors drove the politics of ideas, from the American Revolution through the presidency of Barack Obama. These episodes originally aired as a regular segment on 610 KVNU's For The People radio ...
 
How have writers, illustrators, film makers, and musicians shaped the American experience? In this podcast series historian Dr. Darren R. Reid explores American history through the lens of the artist. From classic comics books to music and film, this podcast examines how art and artistry has reflected and informed the American experience. Featured iTunes podcast (January and February 2014), #1 episodes in Education and Higher Education. Current series, "Comic Book Studies" explores the histo ...
 
A charming collection of 14 short American history plays for the very young - ranging from Christopher Columbus to George Washington to Susan B Anthony. (Summary by Maria Therese)Cast:Narrator; First Maid of Honor; Second Woman: AvailleNarrator; Queen Isabella; Pocohantus: CaprishaPageColumbus; First Merchant; Blount; Squanto; Robert E. Lee: Tom CausbyWise Man; Captain Newport; King; Court; People; Richard Henry Lee; Californians; Auctioneer; Union Soldier: Libby GohnLuis; John Smith; Willia ...
 
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show series
 
The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 inflicted great damage on the American Pacific Fleet, but it left one group of American ships untouched: the aircraft carriers. In early 1942, Japanese Admiral Yamamoto decided to finish the job that his fleet had begun the previous December. Yamamoto authored a plan to send his fleet toward M…
 
On June 2, 1921, thousands of black Tulsans interned at the Tulsa Fairgrounds woke under armed guard. Many had no idea where their loved ones were or if they were still alive; they didn’t know whether their homes were still standing or if they’d been ransacked by the white mob. As Greenwood residents worked to restart lives that had been violently …
 
On this episode, we talk with Dr. Heather Cox Richardson, the author of the wildly popular "Letters from an American: A Newsletter About the History Behind Today's Politics," which is seen by over a million people every night. We not only discuss history, but why it is important to be historically literate as we try to understand what has become a …
 
Talk about tangents! Host Noble Sissle, Jr. begins this episode with a recording his father made with Eubie Blake and gives the background of the musicians. But then he introduces one of the co-writers of the song, Perry Bradford, and the history lesson begins. Sissle and Blake wrote the ragtime song played in this episode, Jubilee Tonight, with ad…
 
Welcome to Episode 32 of the Asian American History 101 podcast! Our main story is a history of the Legislation, mostly at the Federal level, that actually benefitted Asian Americans. Sometimes Asians and Asian Americans were the focus, but other times, our communities received positive benefits just out of happenstance. There were also moments in …
 
“One gets weary of trying to confront the people with the necessity of assessing their own history.” • Bonus episodes!! Research dives! (Often NSFW.) Mugs! Buttons! Books! Plus tons of other fun stuff! $3/month at Patreon.com/QueerSerial. Bonus episodes come right to your phone like any other podcast! If you’re already a Patreon gal, click here to …
 
What can a medieval historian teach us about the role of women in twenty-first century evangelicalism? A lot! In this episode we talk to historian Beth Allison Barr about her book The Making of Biblical Womanhood: How the Subjugation of Women Became Gospel Truth. Join us for a wide-ranging conversation on historical thinking, biblical interpretatio…
 
The battle of Naseby 14th June 1645 The Battle of Naseby was one of the most important battles in British history On English soil it brought the English civil wars back to Northamptonshire and would prove to be one battle to meny for King charles the 1st army in the podcast I'm joined by historian Author and advocate of battlefield Preservation in …
 
This is a discussion I recently had with Samantha Skory, a former student of mine who is now a college graduate and specializes in the Cold War. I have a feeling Sam is going to become a semi-regular guest on the show. I should say we are mostly talking about a book by former U.S. Ambassador to Russia, Michael McFall, but we are really all over the…
 
56 brave men signed the Declaration of Independence. Not all voted for it, and not all who voted for it signed it. Each of the signers was remarkable in his own way, and pledged his life, fortune, and sacred honor. This episode explores the lives of 11 of the signers: Charles Carroll of Carrollton, George With [Wyth], Richard Henry Lee, Thomas Jeff…
 
Thomas Edison believed direct current was the future of electricity. Nikola Tesla and George Westinghouse championed alternating current. In the late 1800s, things were about to get ugly. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio and Grim & Mild による
 
Juneteenth is annual holiday celebrating the emancipation of those who had been enslaved in the United States, its a mix of June and Nineteenth, Originating in Galveston, Texas, it is now celebrated annually on June 19 throughout the United States, with increasing official recognition. It is commemorated on the anniversary date of the June 19, 1865…
 
On February 28, 1972, President Richard Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon were welcomed home by Vice President Spiro Agnew after landing at Andrews Air Force Base following the return of their historic trip to the People's Republic of China. China had been closed off for over two decades from the rest of the world and many saw them as espousing a radi…
 
Morning Meditations Psalm 1 Morning Meditations take the time to stop for a moment and embrace inspirational words that refuel us for the day. These moments of inspiration are taken from the Bible and special inspirational readings. Hopefully this time will inspire you as the listener to start your week with hope, joy, love, and peace. Enjoy a mome…
 
In the summer of 2008, some of the world’s best climbers made their way towards the summit of K2, the second highest mountain on earth. Sunny mornings suddenly transform into hurricane force winds. Avalanches drop from overhead without warning, unexpected blizzards leave climbers disoriented and lost in weather that can drop to 60 below. But that d…
 
Following up on their stunning military successes of late 1941 and early 1942, Japan’s leaders decided to capture the key Allied port of Port Moresby on the southern coast of New Guinea. They also hoped to cut off the critical American supply line from Hawaii to Australia. Unbeknownst to the Japanese, however, American codebreakers had broken enoug…
 
On the night of Tuesday, May 31, 1921, a violent white mob attacked the prosperous Black neighborhood of Greenwood in Tulsa, Oklahoma. As the night progressed, the disorganized mob transformed into something even more deadly: a highly organized force led by volunteer soldiers. On the morning of Wednesday, June 1, that force sprang into action. All …
 
Presidential marriages are subjects of intense fascination. How do they impact political history? Government policy? Is a scandal brewing? When it comes to Abraham Lincoln to Mary Todd, Dr. Michael Burlingame - one of America's most prolific Lincoln scholars - argues their marriage is ripe for answers to all three questions. Listen as we discuss hi…
 
When Richard Nixon took office in 1969, he sought nothing less than to remake American foreign policy. He sought to forge a new balance of power and earn a place among history’s greatest peacemakers. He would go on to monumental achievements, opening relations with China and signing treaties with the Soviet Union, but he would also suffer one of th…
 
In his early years growing up in Indianapolis in the late 1800s and early 1900s, Noble Sissle’s musical destiny had yet to be determined. The talents began to show, but he was still a young boy who loved baseball and working odd jobs. Using research and Sissle’s writings and tape recordings, his son Noble, Jr., podcast host, explores the influences…
 
Welcome to Episode 31 of the Asian American History 101 podcast! It’s PRIDE Month here in the U.S… so Gen and Ted discuss the history of PRIDE Month and celebrate a few notable Asian American and Pacific Islander LGBTQ+ activists. There are so many influential API activists in the LGBTQ+ community… from Kyoshi Kuromiya to Kitty Tsui to Gil Mangaoan…
 
“What is the chief end of man? A: To get rich.” This is the story of the Gilded Age and its first three presidents: Rutherford B. Hayes, James A. Garfield, and Chester A. Arthur. Mark Twain calls this era a “Gilded Age”–that is, a time of great greed covered with a thin veneer hiding the nation’s decadence. Is it? We’ll assess and define this oft-f…
 
“Through the blue cigarette smoke you can make out the outlines of crowded tables.” • Meet me on Crilly Court. Bonus episodes!! Research dives! (Often NSFW.) Mugs! Buttons! Books! Plus tons of other fun stuff! $3/month at Patreon.com/QueerSerial. Bonus episodes come right to your phone like any other podcast! If you’re already a Patreon gal, click …
 
Learn how the Second Continental Congress called upon the Supreme Judge of the World to support its actions. Understand how colonies and local governments had already declared independence before July 4th, how colonies addressed the issue of independence at Congress, and how Congress moved forward with Richard Henry Lee's resolution for independenc…
 
The third and final part of the Bowery Boys Road Trip to Long Island -- the gay history of Fire Island! Fire Island is one of New York state’s most attractive summer getaways, a thin barrier island on the Atlantic Ocean lined with seaside villages and hamlets, linked by boardwalks, sandy beaches, natural dunes and water taxis. (And, for the most pa…
 
When Japan attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, they were just getting started. Over the next 5 months, Japan rapidly and overwhelmingly conquered several European and colonial possessions in southeast Asia, including Guam, Malaya, Wake Island, Hong Kong, Burma, Singapore, the Dutch East Indies, and the Philippines. At the same time, they inf…
 
As Black teenager Dick Rowland sat in a jail cell at the Tulsa courthouse, news of his arrest flew through the town. Egged on by rumors about his alleged rape of white teenager Sarah Page, a white mob bent on a lynching Rowland began assembling outside the courthouse. By that evening, the crowd had swelled to thousands. Meanwhile, some young Africa…
 
The Elephant Experience Black Like Me John Howard Griffin A reading from BH365: An Inclusive Account of American History textbook from the Elephant Experience. White Man Experiences Life As A Negro in the Deep South Can a white person truly understand the black experience? Has anything changed since the 1960's? Is there any hope for our country reg…
 
The entire 35 blocks of the Greenwood commercial district were completely destroyed. A total of 191 Black-owned businesses, several churches, a junior high school, and the district’s only hospital were lost. According to the Red Cross, 1,256 homes were burned with another 215 looted and vandalized. The Tulsa Real Estate Exchange estimated total rea…
 
On this episode, we talk with Dr. Serena Zabin about her groundbreaking book, "The Boston Massacre: A Family History." She explains why we have misunderstood the landmark event in America's founding as a battle between two sides. Rather, she argues, the Boston Massacre was an intimate moment among members of a community. Revolutionary-era Boston wa…
 
Monday Moment In History The History of Memorial Day Did you know? Each year on Memorial Day a national moment of remembrance takes place at 3:00 p.m. local time. It is unclear where exactly this tradition originated; numerous different communities may have independently initiated the memorial gatherings. And some records show that one of the earli…
 
Welcome to Episode 30 of the Asian American History 101 podcast! Happy Memorial Day! As we honor the military personnel who died in various wars and conflicts, Gen and Ted discuss the history of Asian Americans in the military from the beginning through WWII. We also take time to provide a definition for “gaslighting” in a new segment called Terms …
 
It was May, 30th 1921 and on this day Dick Rowland was on his way to the Drexel building. Which was mostly closed for the Memorial day holiday but the building had something that very few buildings in downtown Tulsa had. A colored restroom on the top floor, as Rowland walked toward the elevator. It was being operated by a 17 year old white woman by…
 
Sunday Memoirs The Elephant Experience Is The Black Church Still Influential and Relevant? Part 1 A reading from BH365: An Inclusive Account of American History textbook on the Black Church. Sunday Memoirs takes a look back in the past to find inspiration for the future. We will take time to share great inspiring accounts and building moments of th…
 
Host Noble Sissle, Jr. and his sister Cynthia Sissle explain the origins of the family name and how their grandfather, Reverend George A. Sissle, born in 1852, managed his family of 6 children. However, the story begins with George's father Richard both living as freemen in Lexington, KY and both becoming ministers. The family lore of how the name …
 
Greenwood was named the town after another town called Greenwood, Mississippi. The first store was a grocery store on the corner of Archer and Greenwood ave. The community continued to grow along Archer st. attracting a real estate developer, a dentist, a black physician and a even ministers. Little by little JB Stradford's vision of a black busine…
 
“Another such private club will open next week. Nearly all are in Manhattan and about one-third are operated by underworld figures.” 🔍 Paula Harrington as the New York Times reporter. Looking for some reruns? Check out this handy dandy EPISODE GUIDE. 📺 Music by Blue Dot Sessions.Devlyn Camp による
 
Between 1939 and 1941, the United States began increasing the size of its military forces while it ramped up war production. After Pearl Harbor, these processes went into overdrive, with the result that several million Americans served in uniform in the war years, while America quickly became the world’s greatest industrial and military power. In t…
 
In 1921, Tulsa, Oklahoma boasted one of the nation’s most prosperous African-American communities. Greenwood was home to 108 Black-owned businesses, two theaters, 15 physicians, two newspapers, and a luxury hotel. It was nicknamed “the Black Wall Street.” Then, on May 30th, a Black shoeshine boy named Dick Rowland was accused of assaulting a white …
 
Philadelphia is where America made its sacred pledge that "all men are created equal." Though there are many ways that pledge has not been fulfilled, one of the most striking came in Philadelphia, seventy years after the Declaration of Independence was signed. Dr. Zachary Schrag's book, "The Fires of Philadelphia: Citizen-Soldiers, Nativists, and t…
 
King's Six Principles of Non-Violence Martin Luther King, Jr. A reading from the book BH365: An Inclusive Account of American History 1) Nonviolence is a way of life for courageous people. 2) Nonviolence seeks to win friendship and understanding. 3) Nonviolence seeks to defeat injustice, not people. And more.... To receive more of the "King's Six P…
 
I was joined for a chat by Mike Somerville The president of American Civil War roundtable UK 🇬🇧 In the podcast we talk about how mike first became interested in the American Civil War aswell as the history of the organisation and its future after covid And what you benefits you can expect by becoming a member of the roundtable uk Mike also talked a…
 
Welcome to Episode 29 of the Asian American History 101 podcast! It's Mental Health Awareness Month! There are a number of reasons that Asian Americans face difficulties with mental health. So Gen & Ted dive into the history and reasons that Asian Americans don’t always reach out for mental health help. If you are looking to support organizations f…
 
Hosted by Noble Sissle, Jr., this first Episode into the life and times of Noble Sissle, explores his early upbringing in his family that includes 5 siblings. His father, Reverend George Sissle moved to Indianapolis, IN from Lexington, KY with the family to become the pastor of a Methodist Church. It was here that Noble was born; then it was off to…
 
“[He] washed his hands with the brains.” Private John Shaw This is the story of a 22-year-old George Washington as commander of a 400-man army fighting the French. We’ll also hear about his childhood, the deaths, backcountry experience, and finagling, that bring George—who’s untrained, inexperienced, too young, and completely outgunned—to this mome…
 
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