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A l'heure actuelle, la cinéphilie, qui s'est développée durant les années 1920-1930 avant de connaître une relance particulièrement forte après la Seconde Guerre mondiale, vit une période de crise, liée à une mutation profonde des modes de circulation et de réception des films. Par ailleurs, la presse ne paraît manifestement plus représenter l'espace d'expression privilégié du discours critique. Il est donc nécessaire de réfléchir sur les principes fondateurs de la critique cinématographique.
 
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Hablemos de Historia

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Hablemos de Historia

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Hablemos de Historia es un programa de conversación con historiadores acerca de distintos períodos de la historia de Chile, Latinoamérica y el Mundo. Es grabado en los estudios de Radio UC www.radiouc.cl , emisora de la Facultad de Comunicaciones de la Universidad Católica de Chile, donde ya hemos dialogado con más de 125 invitados. La conducción está a cargo de Sergio Durán Escobar y José Ignacio Mason. Todas las descargas de nuestros podcast son GRATIS. Puedes seguirnos en Facebook y en Tw ...
 
Cotilleos, chascarrillos y vicisitudes variopintas sobre y/de los grandes creadores de las Bellas Artes; anécdotas y datos absurdos que no le interesan a nadie para soltar en reuniones de cualquier estrato social (también botellones) y dejar muertos a tus interlocutores. Sólo apto para los que padecen de hiperculturemia y datofagia.
 
The 18th Amendment, which made it illegal to manufacture, sell, or transport alcohol, went into effect on January 17th, 1920. This led to 13 years of organized crime, corruption, and much bloodshed across the land, as well as what we now refer to as the Roaring ‘20’s. Due to the fortunate failed attempt at prohibition, there was an explosion of Americans developing their own recipes for beer and liquor. We want to praise those early companies that made it through the era and cheer those who ...
 
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Matthew Ricketson joins to discuss how newsrooms, the engine rooms of reporting, have shrunk. A generation of journalists has borne witness to seismic changes in the media and this book shares their stories as essays and narrative interviews. Names include from more than 50 Australian journalists – including Amanda Meade, David Marr and Flip Prior …
 
Fast Cadillac’s, Chris Baird and The Dead Squirrels, Donny Coyle joined the boys at the round table at Alley’s Alehouse for an night of adult humor and fresh craft brews straight from the many rotating taps available to quench any thirst. A show their mother’s will be proud of. Shout outs: Hops and Coaster Drops; Otis Elevator; Union Brewing; Chill…
 
The story of the American newsroom is that of modern American journalism. In The American Newsroom: A History, 1920-1960 (University of Missouri Press, 2021), Will Mari documents a time of great change and controversy in the field, one in which journalism was produced in "news factories" by news workers with dozens of different roles, and not just …
 
Fast Cadillac’s Chris Baird joins Gris, G, & Fresh at Alley’s Alehouse for an evening of craft brews while discussing reality TV, music, more of Dougy’s contempt for greaseball, Kurt Cobain, and lots more invigorating conversation. Brews from The Bier Brewery and the Anchorage Brewing Company. Shout outs in this episode include: Grand Junction Brew…
 
Perspectives on Mass Communication is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Denis McQuail (1935-2017), who was Emeritus Professor at the University of Amsterdam and Visiting Professor at the University of Southampton. He is widely considered to be one of the most influential scholars in the history of mass communication…
 
After putting that lost year behind us, the boys get back in action once again at that wonderous annual Rock the Junction Craft Beer and Music Fest hosted by the Grand Junction Brewing Company in Westfield, Indiana. Whether it’s rain, shine or blistering summer heat, the local Westfield community which has embraced and supported Grand Junction even…
 
Mark Baker is an American journalist and travel writer. In the 1980s, he lived in Vienna and reported on the former Eastern bloc for Business International and The Economist Group. In 1991, he moved to Prague, where he worked as an editor for The Prague Post and co-founded The Globe Bookstore & Coffeehouse. He’s written 30 travel guidebooks for pub…
 
What's it like to cover Donald Trump? In this episode, veteran American journalist Allen Salkin explains. For over three decades, Salkin has written about many things for many high-profile publications, including The New York Post, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Atlantic and others. He is also the author of a number of well-received…
 
Sometimes master brewer, sometimes canvas for body art, always good friend, the one and only Dan Gohr joined the boys at the round table at Alley’s Alehouse to talk about his new, and quite delicious baked goods business, Bonnie Bake. We have been blessed over the last few years of enjoying many of Dan’s craft brews and along with his brewing wisdo…
 
Over the past 15 years, journalism has experienced a rapid proliferation of data about online reader behavior in the form of web metrics. These newsroom metrics influence which stories are written, how news is promoted, and which journalists get hired and fired. Some argue that metrics help journalists better serve their audiences. Others worry tha…
 
In The Life and Times of Louis Lomax: The Art of Deliberate Disunity (Duke University Press, 2021), Thomas Aiello traces the complicated and fascinating life of a pioneering Black journalist and media personality. A witness to some of the most iconic moments of the 1960s, Lomax remains an important yet overlooked civil rights figure, who emerged as…
 
The Pigs are always eager for Rochester road trips to record with Jessica Shafer of The Native Nook and the Digital Wolf Network. This time the boys had the pleasure of jumping on Jessica’s podcast, On The Back Burner with her Cohost, John Adams(who may or may not be a pirate) straight from The Native Nook downtown Rochester, Indiana. Luis and Alis…
 
Until the recent political shift pushed workers back into the media spotlight, the mainstream media had largely ignored this significant part of American society in favor of the moneyed upscale consumer for more than four decades. Christopher R. Martin now reveals why and how the media lost sight of the American working class and the effects of it …
 
David Schmalz is a staff writer at the Monterey County Weekly, where his longform pieces have won numerous awards from the California News Publishers Association, including a first place for enterprise reporting in 2014 for an expose he wrote about a local church's attempt to evict residents from 98 federally subsidized apartments from a property i…
 
If information is power, then so too is gossip. In Gossip Men: J. Edgar Hoover, Joe McCarthy, Roy Cohn, and the Politics of Insinuation (U Chicago Press, 2021), historian Christopher Elias shows how three men who sat at the center of the mid-century surveillance state—FBI director J. Edgar Hoover, the bellicose anticommunist Senator Joe McCarthy, a…
 
The Pigs take a little roadtrip to Warsaw, Indiana to spend an afternoon at the Ledgeview Brewing Company. Owners Craig and Abby, along with tapster and sometimes comedian Tasha Livinghouse, entertain and stuff the Pigs with an array of sumptuous craft brews and scrumptious BBQ. The afternoon went so well, they had to keep the mics hot and record t…
 
David Freedlander is a veteran New York City-based journalist. He writes long-form features about politics and the arts, people and ideas, and has appeared in New York Magazine, Bloomberg, Rolling Stone, ArtNews, The Daily Beast, Newsweek and a host of other publications. In this episode, we are talking about his coverage of New York Politics – the…
 
Over the course of a long and successful legal career, Morris Ernst established himself as one of Americas foremost civil libertarians. Yet his advocacy of free speech – an advocacy that established the case law on which much of the subsequent jurisprudence is based – stands in stark contrast with his opposition to communism and his longstanding su…
 
Sex abuse happens in all communities, but American minority religions often face disproportionate allegations of sexual abuse. Why, in a country that consistently fails to acknowledge—much less address—the sexual abuse of women and children, do American religious outsiders so often face allegations of sexual misconduct? Why does the American public…
 
In considering how legislation moves forward in the American political system, we often think about elected representatives sitting in committee hearings or Senators speaking from the floor of the Senate to make a particular point. Woven into all of these ideas, which are not misguided, is the role (often behind the scenes) that congressional leade…
 
The boys gather around the round table at Pinheads & Alley’s Alehouse to dig into some Prohibition history while sampling a few of the many fine craft brews on tap. The conversation zigs and zags through alcohol talk, some nerdy Star Wars analysis, and weird alcohol laws around the country. Crack a cold one and tune in to this week’s episode and be…
 
Throughout her career, spanning more than two decades, Jessica Hopper, a revered and pioneering music critic, has examined women recording and producing music, in all genres, through an intersectional feminist lens. The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic (MCD x Fsg Originals, 2021) features oral histories of bands like Hol…
 
The Value of Voice is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Nick Couldry, Professor of Media, Communications and Social Theory in the Department of Media and Communications at the London School of Economics. This wide-ranging conversation explores how the media can be used as a filter to examine power structures, politi…
 
What would it feel like to wake up inside the head of someone who writes about science for a living? John Horgan, acclaimed author of the bestseller The End of Science, answers that question in his genre-bending new book Pay Attention: Sex, Death, and Science (MIT Press, 2020), a stream-of-consciousness account of a day in the life of his alter ego…
 
The legendary Magnum photo agency has long been associated with heroic lone wolf male photographers such as Frank Capa and Henri Cartier-Bresson, roaming the world in search of the “decisive moment” – the perfect shot that captured the essence of a major news story. Nadya Bair’s highly original book The Decisive Network: Magnum Photos and the Postw…
 
Today we are talking to a New Yorker staff writer Carrie Battan about her piece from March of this year "How Politics Tested Ravelry and the Crafting Community" – about how a quote unquote “nice website about yarn” got involved in radical politics. Battan began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015 and became a staff writer in 2018. She has contri…
 
The boys take a break from the summer heat with some cocktails and cold craft brews on tap at Alley’s Alehouse. Alex, Alley’s very own mad mixologist, helps kick off the evening with a round of tasty Bacon Old Fashions made with Rittenhouse Rye Whiskey. Tune in for an hour of alcohol talk and beer reviews and make your way to Pinheads & Alley’s Ale…
 
In First to Fall: Elijah Lovejoy and the Fight for a Free Press in the Age of Slavery (Pegasus Books, 2021), Ken Ellingwood takes readers back to the first true test of the First Amendment's guarantees of free speech and a free press through the story of abolitionist newspaper editor Elijah Lovejoy. The story unfolds during the 1830s, a period know…
 
Recent protests around the world (such as the Arab Spring uprisings and Occupy Wall Street movements) have drawn renewed interest to the study of social change and, especially, to the manner in which words, images, events, and ideas associated with protestors can "move the social." What Democracy Looks Like: The Rhetoric of Social Movements and Cou…
 
Raúl Diego Rivera Hernández's book Narratives of Vulnerability in Mexico's War on Drugs (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020) explores the current human rights crisis created by the War on Drugs in Mexico. It focuses on three vulnerable communities that have felt the impacts of this war firsthand: undocumented Central American migrants in transit to the Unite…
 
The connection between local news and political polarization is a hot topic that scholars in political science, journalism, and other fields have explored from multiple angles. It's not often that a real-world experiment presents itself, but that's exactly what happened when a Google alert landed in the inboxes of Joshua P. Darr., Matthew P. Hitt, …
 
In early twentieth century British India, prior to the arrival of digital medias and after the rise of nationalist political movements, a small-town paper from the margins of society became a key player in Urdu journalism. Published in the isolated market town of Bijnor, Madinah grew to hold influence across North India and the Punjab while navigat…
 
Past guests, the members of the band Red Remains, still intact and rockin’, join the boys at Alley’s Alehouse for some brews while catching up with what they’ve been doing and what’s coming up for their fans in the near future. It may have been a hungry bunch as the conversation leaned heavily on beer and fast food guilty pleasures. Some beer revie…
 
What’s the greatest crisis facing America today? — Racism and hate crimes, exploding government debt, climate change, or the mess at the border? It may be none of these. America and many other countries are trapped in high conflict. Both sides are paralyzed by fear and anger as they demonize the other. The national narrative of "us versus them" is …
 
The future of local news and the connection between local news and democracy are two of the hottest topics in philanthropy, education, and media these days. Nikki Usher addresses both head-on in her new book, News for the Rich, White, and Blue: How Place and Power Distort American Journalism (Columbia University Press, 2021). In the book and in thi…
 
One third of The Dead Squirrels joined Dougy Fresh and Paulie G at Alley’s Alehouse for a warm, long overdue reunion. The boys had a blast talking about old times and what’s new with the band including a new drummer, Justin Alley and the usual odd ramblings by Donny. Beer and music conversation always make for a great time. Crack a cold one and tun…
 
On Heels in the Middle East (Pardes Publishing, 2020) is the first book of Ksenia Svetlova, an Israeli journalist of Russian origin who covered the Middle East extensively during the last two decades. Svetlova takes us on a journey to Hizbullah dominated parts of Beirut, refugee camps in Gaza, Qaddafi's Libya and the revolutionary squares of the Ar…
 
Many believe the solution to ongoing crises in the news industry — including profound financial instability and public distrust — is for journalists to improve connections to their audiences. Conversations about the proper relationship between the media and the public go back to Walter Lippmann and John Dewey and through the public journalism movem…
 
The homebrewing boys from Wolfoose join the round table once again, this time at the Blind Pigs’ home, Alley’s Alehouse inside the Pinheads Entertainment Center in Fishers, Indiana. As the brothers of Wolfoose keep stepping forward with their own craft brew business plans, they take time to drink and talk brews with the Pigs. In this week’s episode…
 
Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren’t an island, and neither are we. So we reached across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we’d bring in an expert about something? Email us at cgessler05@gmail.com or dr.danamalon…
 
Matthew Karp is a historian of the U.S. Civil War era and its relationship to the nineteenth-century world. He received his Ph.D. in History from the University of Pennsylvania in 2011 and joined the Princeton faculty in 2013. The piece we are talking about is The Politics of a Second Gilded Age, published in February 2021 in The Jacobin. His first…
 
Feeling betrayed by liberal ideals in the US and UK, how are Chinese international students dealing with rising racism during the pandemic? Bingchun Meng from LSE talks to Joanne Kuai, a visiting PhD student at NIAS, about her latest research project, “Mediated Experience of Covid-19”, based on her students' real stories and their sophisticated ref…
 
In recent years Americans have experienced a range of assaults upon the truth. In The Constitution of Knowledge: A Defense of Truth (Brookings Institution Press, 2021), Jonathan Rauch describes the various ways in which our understanding of truth has come under attack, and the mechanisms that exist to fight back. As Rauch explains, the challenge of…
 
At a time when trust in the media is low and "news deserts" are increasing across the United States, engaged journalism offers a framework for connecting people, community organizations, and news organizations in ways that aim to rebuild trust and ensure that news coverage is inclusive and representative of the entire community. Andrea Wenzel's boo…
 
Defining the Chief Executive via flash powder and selfie sticks. In this episode, Dr. Lee M. Pierce (they & she) interviews Dr. Cara A. Finnegan about Photographic Presidents: Making History from Daguerreotype to Digital (University of Illinois Press, 2021). Lincoln's somber portraits. Lyndon Johnson's swearing in. George W. Bush's reaction to lear…
 
Julie Golia's new book Newspaper Confessions: A History of Advice Columns in a Pre-Internet Age (Oxford UP, 2021) chronicles the history of the newspaper advice column, a genre that has shaped Americans’ relationships with media, their experiences with popular therapy, and their virtual interactions across generations. Emerging in the 1890s, advice…
 
To many mathematicians and math enthusiasts, the word "innumeracy" brings to mind popular writing like that of John Allen Paulos. But inequities in our quantitative reasoning skills have received considerable interest and attention from researchers lately, including in psychology, development, education, and public health. Innumeracy in the Wild: M…
 
BPC - 237 - Homeblowers Welcome to another edition of our show. Recording from the Blind Pig Garage, Dougie Fresh, Paulie G and Griswold are joined again by the Wolfoose brothers and, of course, we veer off into any and all topics. We talk about some of the upcoming brew fests, sample some great brews from around the country and discuss the special…
 
In this episode, we are talking to ProPublica investigative journalist Justin Elliott. Justin has been with ProPublica since 2012 and writes about business and economics, as well as money and influence in politics. He has produced stories for the New York Times and NPR. His work on TurboTax maker Intuit – a story we are discussing today -- won a Ge…
 
In an age of mutual acrimony and closed borders, journalists were among the few individuals who crossed the Iron Curtain. Their reporting strongly influenced the ways that policy makers, pundits, and ordinary people came to understand the American or the Soviet "other." In Cold War Correspondents: Soviet and American Reporters on the Ideological Fr…
 
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